HERITAGE 100

THE TRIBUNE July 14, 1970

HERITAGE 100

The Winnipeg Tribune salutes Manitoba’s hundredth birthday with a special 100-page edition about the people and events of our province’s first century. From the past came the heritage of which Manitoban of the future will build a greater province. The story of the past is told in the following five sections, year by year, in words and pictures. c-2

On this and following pages, The Tribune presents a selection of events, major and minor, in the life of Manitoba, as recorded in newspapers, diaries, letters and books.

1870

  • Sept. 6 – Lt. Gov. Archibald held his first levee at Hudson Bay House, later the governor’s residence, Silver Heights.
  • Nov. 17 – First farm implement, steam engine and sewing machine agency was opened by J. and G. D. McVicar.
  • Nov. 26 – J. W. Taylor was appointed U.S. consul.
  • Dec. 26 – 1st Ontario Rifles Music and Dramatic Association produced “The Child of Circumstance” at the Theatre Royal in the Bannatyne Building

1871

  • Jan. 17 – W. G. Fonseca held the first auction sale in Manitoba.
  • Jan. 27 – The Presbytery of Manitoba appointed Rev, John Black, A. Sutherland, J. Ross, J. P. Matheson and A. McBeth to “plan the building of a first-class academy and boarding establishment.”
  • April 10 – Construction started on Grace Church, and the building was dedicated Sept. 17. Rev. George Young had held the first Methodist service in Manitoba July 4, 1868.
  • April 18 – First Highway Act designated The Pembina Trail (now Highway 75), the Portage Trail (No. 1 West) and the Dawson Trail as Great Highways.
  • May 10 – Survey started on Main Street which was then graded to a width of 132 feet with one rod (5½ yards) on each side for sidewalks.
  • June 8 – Post office boxes were installed by postmaster A.G.B. Bannatyne.
  • July 1 – First celebration of Dominion Day.
  • Aug. 3 – First Indian treaty was signed under the new government.
  • Sept. 1 – First veterinary surgeon W. F. Alloway opened practice.
  • Sept. 11 – First stage coach from United States arrived. This was a tri-weekly service, Alexander Begg stage and express manager.
  • Oct. 31 – The first public school opened, near present Royal Alexandra Hotel with W. F. Luxton, principal, and 30 pupils.
  • Nov 10 – Manitoba College, operated by the Presbyterian Church opened for first classes.
  • Nov. 20 – H. McDougall sent the first telegraph message to Ottawa.

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1872

  • Jan. 4 – Alex McMicken opened the first banking office in the province – a branch of the Dominion Savings Bank at Portage Ave. and Fort St., and introduced issuance of cheques in the NorthWest Territories.
  • Mar. 9 – Manitoba Gazette and Trade Review started publication.
  • Mar. 17 – Archbishop Tache celebrated pontifical high mass for first observance of St. Patrick’s Day.
  • May 9 –A hansom cab service was started by David Landrigan.
  • June 6 – W. J. Macauley started to build Winnipeg’s first sawmill and imported two million feet of sawn lumber and a similar quantity in logs.
  • June 20-27 – Alexander Begg started a confectionery store and dining room.
  • July 13 – James Irwin, with water tank wagon, offered river water for domestic use.
  • July 27 – L. Hayward conducted an auction of Hudson’s Bay Company lots of 50 foot frontage along Main Street. Prices ran as high as $2,000 per lot.
  • Nov. 9 – Weekly Manitoba Free Press first issued, with John Kenny, proprietor and W. F. Luxton editor.
  • Nov. 30 – Winnipeg census showed a population of 1,467 – 1,019 male and 448 female.
  • Dec. 13 – Winnipeg General Hospital organized.
  • Dec. 14 – Duncan McArthur opened a branch of Merchants Bank, whose Main St. premises included living quarters for the manager and clerks.

1873

  • Feb. 11 – Circulars were issued calling for organization of a Board of Trade.
  • Feb. 20 – Some businessmen who didn’t get the Feb. 11 Board of Trade circular held a meeting and formed their own organization.
  • Mar. 6 – The first street lamp was installed in front of Davis’ Hotel.
  • May 8 – W. F. Alloway opened Winnipeg’s first tobacco store.
  • June 9 – A lacrosse club was organized in Winnipeg.
  • June 25 – Two hundred attended the last Indian dog feast held at Point Douglas.
  • Aug. 7 – A Miss Moncrief from Glasgow advertised the opening of the first professional dressmaker’s shop.
  • Aug. 26 – Aetna Life Insurance Company appointed Piton and Ismay the first insurance agents in Manitoba.
  • Nov. 24 – McMicken’s bank moved into the first brick veneer building in the town.
  • Dec. 3 – The town’s first big fire destroyed the legislative building.
  • Dec. 6 – R. H. Cronn advertised that he had leased the Canada Pacific Hotel.

1874

  • Jan. 5 – F. E. Cornish elected first mayor of Winnipeg.
  • Jan. 19 – First city council meeting held.
  • Feb. 19 – First city police force authorized, John S. Ingram chief.
  • Mar. 18 – Meeting at Davis Hotel organized first baseball club.
  • June 5 – Police investigated city’s burglary, that of a $3,000 bale of furs, and arrested Frank Martin who had been spending money while having no visible means of support.
  • July 6 – First daily Free Press contained ads from Hudson’s Bay Co. and Ashdown’s, reports of Sioux massacre, the fall of the Manitoba government and a city council meeting.
  • July 18 – John Hackett bought first through ticket, Winnipeg to Glasgow, via U.S., Quebec and the Allan Line, at a cost of $65.
  • Sept. 17 – William Dodd paid the first municipal tax in Manitoba or the North West Territories, $4.
  • Sept. 30 – City issued $250,000 in debentures which were sold in Europe November 1.
  • Oct. 5 – Meeting held to organize a YMCA. – Manitoba College was moved to site in Point Douglas.
  • Nov. 28 – City fire department took delivery of the first steam fire engine.

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1876

  • Feb. 4 – Meeting held at Manitoba College to consider establishment of a provincial university. – Legislative Council (upper house) abolished itself by 20-1 vote.
  • Feb. 14 – First Winnipeg directory issued.
  • Mar. 11 – First cricket club organized.
  • Mar. 14 – New city hall opened.
  • Mar. 27 – Fire brigade resigned after difference with city council; reorganized April 1876 and again 1877.
  • Apr. 6 – First telegraph message, Winnipeg-Battle River.
  • May 1 – Name of post office changed from Fort Garry to Winnipeg. – Chambers Biscuit Company factory opened.
  • July 1 – First Manitoba Directory, forerunner of Henderson’s Directory, published.
  • Aug. 15 – First boat race on Red River, $20 prize.
  • Nov. 5 – Curling Club organized.
  • Oct. 6 – HBC started flour mill with 1,350 bushel per day capacity.
  • Oct. 21 – Higgins and Young sent first wheat shipment to Ontario.
  • Dec. 18 – First sewer installation in city completed.

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1877

  • Jan. 6 – McLean’s flour mill operating at river junction. Day and night shifts needed to handle great quantity of grain on hand.
  • Feb. 20 – Bill to incorporate University of Manitoba introduced in the Legislature.
  • Apr. 21 – Letter in newspaper protested the location of a livery stable in the Post Office (Lombard) St. business district.
  • May 24 – Five killed and three injured by gun-powder explosion at the Lower Fort.
  • May 30 – Sod turning ceremonies held for Anglican Church girls’ school.
  • June 2 – Newspaper reported that a Mrs. Cedarholm and a Miss Garrison entered the Red Saloon on Main St. Saturday night and astonished the occupants by reading Bible passages to them.
  • June 12 – City paid $4,000 for 100 acres to create Brookside Cemetery.
  • July 19 – Omnibus line operated on Main St. – for one day.
  • Aug. 6 – Lord Dufferin, governor-general, arrived on steamer Minnesota, stayed at Silver Heights (then government house) and laid the corner stone for St. Johns’ Ladies’ College.
  • Oct. 4 – First meeting of the University of Manitoba council.
  • Oct. 17 – First wheat shipment to Glasgow, by R. Gerrie.
  • Nov. 23 – First telephone was installed in the residence of H. McDougall, who controlled the company until it was sold to Bell Telephone in 1881.
  • Dec. 27 – Residents of the area reported rain, frogs croaking in ditches and marshes, mallards swimming on sloughs and flowers blooming, for Christmas.

1878

  • Jan. 13 – At a winter festivity in Point Douglas, a dance, a birth, a christening, a fight and a death occurred within a few hours.
  • Jan. 24 – CPR telegraph line in continuous operation between Winnipeg and Edmonton, the 800-mile circuit the longest without a repeater on the continent.
  • Jan. 29 – Legislature passed a bill to regulate the selling of intoxicating liquors.
  • Feb. 2 – Flour mill at Portage la Prairie adapted to produce oatmeal.
  • Feb. 3 – C. W. Seebold, first pawnbroker in the city, opened for business opposite the courthouse. (Courthouse was located on Main Street near present William Ave.).
  • Feb. 5 – Winnipeg’s first second hand store, operated by a Mrs. Finney, opened on Notre Dame Ave.
  • Apr. 8 – Biggest grain shipment to date, 8½ tons, made by W. J. S. Traill, to Europe.
  • May 16 – Cowhides imported into city for first time.
  • May 27 – First University of Manitoba examinations held for seven candidates.
  • June 22 – First circus made its appearance in Manitoba, went broke and disbanded in Winnipeg.
  • July 14 – Tornado hit city with hail, waterspouts and cyclonic winds.
  • Oct – First interment in Brookside Cemetery.
  • Nov. 15 – Public meeting passed a resolution urging the city to aid construction of bridge across Red river, and suggested a bonus of $300,000 to encourage building of a railway west from Winnipeg.
  • Dec. 9 – First train departed from St. Boniface to St. Paul, Minn.
  • Dec. 23 – First freight arrived by rail from St. Paul.

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1879

  • Jan. 8 – Last mail stage from U. S. arrived St. Boniface and last stage to south left Jan. 9.
  • Jan. 24 – Federal letters of incorporation issued to Winnipeg Board of Trade, A. G. B. Bannatyne, president.
  • Mar. 3 – Snowshoe club organized first race which was won by novice competitor C. D. Rickards, to the chagrin of experts.
  • Mar. 22 – Special train from St. Vincent, Minn. brought in carload of fresh fruit, first such shipment to Winnipeg since wagon load brought in 1874.
  • April 1 – Many retail firms adopted cash only policy, and promised price reductions to pass on to consumer reduced cost of doing business.
  • May 16 – YMCA organized.
  • May 17 – First walking race held, winner covering 150 miles in 48 hours.
  • June 16 – Young and Hennessy started vinegar works.
  • Aug. 1 – Central Congregational Church organized with Rev. William Ewing pastor.
  • Sept. 29 – C. J. Brown became city clerk, a post he was to hold for 40 years.

1880

  • Feb. 5 – First piles driven for bridge across Red River.
  • Feb. 8 – Philharmonic Society organized by W. N. Kennedy.
  • July 28 – Pile bridge across Red River formally opened.
  • Aug. 9 – Foundations laid for Louise Bridge. Free Press editorially deplored “rowdyism” following the official ceremonies.

1881

  • Mar. 14 – Winnipeg bylaw licensed water carts to sell water obtained from springs.
  • Mar. 25 – Controversy raged over dismantling of Pile Bridge.
  • May 22 – City’s first telephone exchange, operated by a boy, connected 12 subscribers. Capacity was 150 lines.
  • June 7 – Swing portion of Louise Bridge tested.
  • July 26 – First train passed over Louise Bridge.
  • Aug. 9 – Excavation started at Point Douglas on new Ogilvie Flour mill. Site cost $4,000 and location chosen as result of city giving mill 20-year tax exemption.
  • Oct. 9 – Telegraph service opened between Brandon and Winnipeg.
  • Dec. 21 – First locomotive turned on CPR roundhouse.

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1882

  • Jan. 9 – S. R. Eaton, J. R. Lindsay opened Winnipeg Business College.
  • Jan. 16 – Hambly and Griffith opened Winnipeg Steam Laundry at 36 Princess St., with pickup and delivery.
  • Mar. 24 – Ottawa shipped 1,500 tents to Winnipeg to accommodate the rapidly growing population.
  • Mar. – First train arrived from Fort William.
  • April 1 – First free letter-carrier service started.
  • April 2 – Seven carloads of ready-made houses shipped from Ontario, as population outgrew existing housing.
  • April 20 – Highest Red River waters since flood of 1852 swept away piling for bridge at east end of Broadway.
  • June 10 – First Jewish immigrant party of 70 arrived.
  • Aug. 23 – First horse tram service ran on Main St., from CPR station to Assiniboine R. Rails laid on solid wooden platforms to keep horses’ feet out of mud.
  • Aug. 29 – A Mr. Perkins, court stenographer, imported first typewriter.
  • Sept. 12 – Manitoba College opened.
  • Oct. 15 – Three electric lights installed on Main St., at Broadway and Main, Lombard and Main and CPR depot. HBC mill supplied power.
  • Dec. 10 – Dr. S. E. Silcox opened Central Congregational Church.

Also this year:

  • Upper Fort Garry sold and demolished, except for north gate.
  • Speculative boom at Emerson collapsed.
  • Settlement started at Brandon, Virden, Pipestone and Oak Lake.
  • Portage Westbourne and North Western Railway reached Minnedosa.
  • Manitoba and South Western Railway taken over by CPR

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1883

During this year:

  • The big real estate boom ended in Manitoba.
  • Maj. A. C. Boulton led party of settlers to present site of Russell.
  • Violent blizzard in southern Manitoba claimed several lives.
  • Eastern Boundary dispute with Ontario became active issue.
  • Farmers’ Protective Union of Manitoba formed and held large meeting in Brandon.
  • First mail by railway left for Ottawa.
  • Jan. 23 – Provincial election, Norquay government re-elected.
  • Jan. 28 – Messrs. Eddy and Palmer left city police force, set up detective agency.
  • Jan. 30 – Toll charge removed from Main St. bridge.
  • Feb. 9 – Rowing Club formed with 150 members, to build $2,500 floating club-house, spend $1,000 on boats.
  • Feb. 10 – Led by Dr. Whiteford and Lynch, doctors formed “Medico-Chirurgical Society of Winnipeg.”
  • Feb. 20 – CPR special freight arrived from Ottawa after 14-day trip.
  • Feb. 26 – CPR circular announced the railway station in Winnipeg was open, and fare from St. Boniface to Winnipeg was open, and fare from St. Boniface to Winnipeg was 10 cents.
  • Mar. 7 – Military Gymnasium open to public, fee $5.
  • Mar. 16 – McBain, Woods and Co. open biscuit, broom and spice factory with 40-50 employees. First department to open using 45 barrels flour daily.
  • Mar. 20 – Tram company found 5-cent fare insufficient, raised rate to 10 cents. Service suspended while workmen tear up rails to clear winter ice.
  • Mar. 21 – City to pay half cost of gravelling streets including Main, King, Princess, Queen, William and Market.
  • Apr. 16 – City signs contract with North-West Electric Co. to supply street lights, 38 lamps burning 240 nights a year at 7 and four-fifths cents per light per hour. No lights to be lit for seven nights preceding full moon and two nights after.
  • June 9 – Winnipeg Rowing Club holds first regatta.
  • July 7 – Charter issued to Manitoba Club.
  • July 9 – Winnipeg Stock Exchange received first telegraphic reports of stock prices.
  • Aug. 11 – George Broughall completed 310-mile summer vacation jaunt through southern Manitoba.
  • Aug. 13 – Cornerstone of Holy Trinity Church laid.
  • Sept. 16 – City opens first incinerator.
  • Oct. 24 – Portage la Prairie meeting seeks IOOF charter.

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1884

  • Manitoba Farmers Protective Union was joined by the Manitoba Rights League.
  • The eastern boundary dispute with Ontario ws settled by the courts in favor of Ontario.
  • Legislation authorized setting up of rural municipalities, a compromise between the township and country systems.
  • The Trades and Labor Council, based on industrial unionism of Knights of Labor, was organized.
  • Jan. 31 – Icelandic Dramatic Co. gave first North American production of native drama “The Outlaws,” in Icelandic, with English program notes and synopsis. The Italian Orchestra provided music.
  • Feb. 13 – Inauguration of Winnipeg General Hospital new site marked by a ball held by the Women’s Auxiliary, which netted $1,564.85.
  • July 20 – Mayor Logan laid cornerstone for new city hall.
  • Sept. 7 – Col. Kennedy left with force of Red River boatmen for service in Egypt and Sudan with Gen. Kitchener.
  • Oct. 7 – Mayor Logan laid first block of wooden paving on Main St. Thirty-six carloads of blocks, timber, sand and gravel used.
  • Nov. 16 – Christ Church introduced surplice choir, only second such choir in Canada.

1885

  • Manitoba supplied three volunteer units – an artillery field battery, the Royal Winnipeg Rifles and the Winnipeg Light Infantry – for General Middleton’s army sent to deal with the North-West Rebellion in what is now northern Saskatchewan.
  • Federal government issued a charter for a railway from Winnipeg to Hudson Bay.
  • Manitoba and North-Western Railroad reached Rapid City, ceased construction at Hamiota due to lack of funds.
  • Aug. 22 – First bicycle relay race held between Winnipeg and Portage la Prairie.
  • Sept. 6 – First train from Montreal over CPR reached Winnipeg, although the line was not properly completed.
  • Aug. 4 – Land office issued first title under Torrens title system, since its adoption by Manitoba. Second title issued Oct. 23.

1886

  • A CPR branch line reached the new town of Souris.
  • A severe depression resulted in the price of no. 1 hard wheat dropped to new low of 53 cents a bushel at Brandon.
  • Construction started on Hudson Bay Railways northward from Winnipeg.
  • Premier John Norquay won an addition to the federal subsidy, and was victorious in provincial election of Dec. 9.
  • Federal government started the Brandon Experimental Farm.
  • Company started drilling for oil in Lake Dauphin area.
  • First international regatta held at Minnetonka, Minn., by newly-formed St. Paul, Minneapolis and Winnipeg Association. Most of races won by the Winnipeg Club.
  • July 1 – First CPR train in regular service arrived from Montreal.
  • Sept. 28 – Memorial unveiled by Lt. Gov. J. C. Aikins, to members of the 90th Regiment killed in the Northwest Rebellion.
  • Dec. 8 – Salvation Army commenced operations in Winnipeg with meeting in the Victoria Hall, later the Winnipeg Theatre.

1887

  • Manitoba farmers reaped a bumper crop, and lack of storage at railway sidings resulted in “grain blockade,” with sacked grain piled in long rows at each shipping point.
  • Winnipeg Grain Exchange was organized.
  • Premier John Norquay retired, following charges of financial irregularities in his administration.
  • D. H. Harrison became premier.
  • Feb. 22 – YMCA incorporated.
  • June 24 – University of Manitoba held its first convocation in Winnipeg City Hall.
  • July 2 – Premier Norquay and Mayor L. M. Jones turned first sod for Red River Railway.
  • Aug. 18 – Manitoba Floral Association held its first show in Trinity Hall.
  • Aug. – Winnipeg was host city to international rowing regatta, Winnipeg Club winning senior fours and doubles.
  • Nov. 15 – General Hospital opened first nurses’ training school.
  • Dec. 7 – Winnipeg Grain Exchange opened for business, Daniel H. McMillan, president, C. N. Bell, secretary.

1888

  • Premier Harrison retired, and a new government headed by Liberal leader Thomas Greenway was named.
  • Greenway negotiations with Ottawa result in end of CPR’s monopoly clause and of federal disallowance of Manitoba railway charters.
  • Greenway effected redistribution of provincial constituencies, and won election in June, with 35 seats to five for the Conservatives.
  • Northern Pacific and Manitoba Railway formed to take over Red River Valley Railway.
  • R. P. Roblin left Liberal Party and became an independent member of the Legislature.
  • Mar. 26 – Government House sold to Thomas Kelly for $100 to be torn down for firewood. Kelly also bought and demolished old building used as prison by Riel.
  • Oct. 8 – “Battle” of Fort Whyte between CPR and NPM Railway construction gangs.
  • Dec. 6 – Manitoba Curling Association was organized.

1889

  • Railway branch line pushed west from Morris resulted in founding of new towns including Miami and Wawanesa.
  • The great Manitoba School Question started to become major public issue.
  • Manitoba opened an immigration office in Toronto.
  • Provincial government rescued Emerson from the load of debt left after collapse of 1882 boon.
  • University of Manitoba, hitherto an examining body only, authorized to start teaching.
  • Mar. 5 – Following its first council meeting Jan. 17, Manitoba Curling Association held its first bonspiel, a three-day event, with $1,200 in prizes. Rinks were present from Thistle, Winnipeg, Granite, Portage la Prairie, Stonewall and Stony Mountain clubs.
  • Aug. 10 – Four-oared crew won championship at Pullman, Ill. rowing races, the top competition in North America. Crew was H. Garwood, J. H. Turnbull, A. C. L. Fox and G. F. Galt (stroke).
  • Sept. 3 – Cornerstone of first Jewish synagogue ws laid.

1890

  • Former Premier Norquay died.
  • Manitoba Central Railway constructed between Brandon and Rapid City.
  • School Act ended denominational school system in Manitoba.
  • Legislature abolished French as an official language in Manitoba Assembly, courts and civil service.
  • Manitoba opened an immigration office in Liverpool.
  • Winnipeg General Hospital started an ambulance service.
  • First organized hockey games were played at Austin’s open-air rink. Victorias and Winnipegs played two games during season, won one each.
  • Feb. 25 – Meeting at City Hall discussed holding an annual exhibition and asked city to issue $30,000 debentures for buying a site and erecting buildings.

1891

  • There were no takers for an offer of a cash subsidy of $1,500,000 towards building a Hudson Bay Railway.
  • Dr. J. K. Barrett started lawsuit to test Manitoba School Act in the courts.
  • Clifford Sifton became attorney-general in Greenway cabinet.
  • The first Ukrainians arrived to survey settlement possibilities.
  • A new farm organization, the Patrons of Industry was formed in the Portage la Prairie area.
  • Sept 28 – Oct. 3 – “Manitoba’s Great Fair,” the Winnipeg Industrial Exhibition opened. First day saw 7,000 admissions to view 4,000 exhibits. Provincial grant was $7,500, city gave 70 acres and $30,000. Prize list valued at $13,500.

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1892

During this year:

  • Plebiscite majority backed provincial prohibition of sale of liquor, but Greenway government did not act on vote, claiming uncertainty as to its powers under the constitution.
  • Great-West Life Assurance Company formed.
  • Manitoba and North Western Hockey Association formed and played scheduled games during the 1892-93 season at McIntyre Rink.
  • July 23 – Greenway government won provincial election.
  • July 26 – First electric street cars tested on Main St. north of CPR tracks. “The road bed was in splendid condition and the full speed of seven miles an hour was attained.”
  • Sept. 5 – Electric street railway lines officially opened, with tracks running from CPR depot south on Main St. to Broadway.
  • March 11 – School Act amendment passed ending denominational school system in Manitoba.
  • Feb. 12 – Legislature passed act abolishing French as official language in Assembly, courts, civil service.
  • Dec 15 – Manitoba opened immigration office in Liverpool.
  • Jan. 28 – Winnipeg Grain Exchange men saw little hope of further wheat price increases (May wheat at Duluth then at 87½c).
  • Feb. 1 – Temperance lecturers “making quite a commotion” in Holland, 200 sign the pledge at Treherne.
  • Feb. 21 – Portage la Prairie municipal council motion urged English as only official language, adoption of non-denominational school system.
  • March 12 – Teams hauling supplies for big annual timber drive on Birdtail River, (Birtle).
  • April 3 – A Mr. Hazlewood, Deloraine farmer, killed when his team bolted into path of train.
  • May 6 – Carberry horsemen planned a big race meet July 4 with purses valued at $1,200.
  • June 19 – Electrical storm at Brandon knocked down and injured Dr. Fleming, set fire to Lee’s store.
  • July 23 – In Winnipeg, a painter named Smart was dismissed by his employer, H. Wood, for taking part in trade union parade.
  • Aug. 2 – Several hundred Icelanders paraded in Winnipeg to mark anniversary of home rule for Iceland.
  • Sept. 8 – Yacht Keewatin wrecked on Lake Winnipeg. William Watts, Selkirk, only survivor of crew of four.
  • Oct. 6 – Fall fairs were under way at Virden, Oak Lake, Austin and Gretna.
  • Oct. 11 – Electric lights turned on at Portage la Prairie.
  • Nov. 3 – Wall of new registry building at Brandon collapsed, two injured. Kelly Bros. of Winnipeg contractors.
  • Nov. 29 – R. B. Hill of Portage la Prairie published his history of Manitoba.
  • Dec. 3 – Ex-premier I. A. Davis sued in Chicago for breach of promise and seduction.
  • Dec. 20 – Selkirk reported 2,000,000 lbs. of whitefish handled during year.
  • Dec. 26 – Churches, charitable groups provided aid for 200 needy families at Christmas in Winnipeg.

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1893

  • Parks Board was set up by Winnipeg.
  • Winnipeg all-star hockey team won nine out of 11 games played during eastern tour. – Reine Lagimodiere, first white child born in what is now Manitoba, died in St. Boniface, aged 86.
  • May 29 – Winnipeg Baseball Club organized.
  • June 26 – Winnipeg Canoe Club chartered, first clubhouse built on Red River in Norwood.
  • Oct. 2 – First electric elevator installed in Ryan Bldg.
  • Nov. 13 – Steam cider press added to one of local breweries.
  • Dec. 5 – Winnipeg Clearing House issued first returns on local banking transactions.

1894

  • Portage, Winnipeg and Northwestern Railway sold to CPR. – Trades and Labor Council based on craft unions, organized.
  • Alexander Begg published his History of the North-West.
  • Jan. 1 – J. Burr Tyrell and Dominion Geological Survey party reached Selkirk after 3,200-mile trip across Barren Lands.
  • Feb. 21 – Winnipeg merchants asked 7 p.m. store-closing legislation.
  • May 11 – Horse-trams stopped running after 12-year operation.
  • May 19 – St. John’s and Kildonan areas got electric street car service.
  • Nov. 14 – Winnipeg General Hospital opened free dispensary.
  • Lt.-Gov. Sir John Schultz unveiled Seven Oaks monument.
  • Winnipeg General Hospital opened its isolation wing and set up first nurses’ residence.

1895

  • In London, the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council upheld Manitoba legislation abolishing the dual religious school system.
  • May 29 – First Dominion Express money order issued.
  • Aug. 22 – Bicycle relay race held, Winnipeg to Portage la Prairie.
  • Winnipeg team again won North American rowing championship.

1896

  • Mackenzie and Mann formed Manitoba and North Western Railway, built line from Gladstone north to Dauphin.
  • Manitoba School Question was major issue in federal election.
  • Jan. 15 – Greenway government again returned as result of provincial election.
  • Feb. 14 – Winnipeg Victorias won Stanley Cup.
  • June 3 – Wesley College (now University of Winnipeg) formally opened.

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War dominated turn of century

1897-1901

1897

  • Town of Dauphin was founded.
  • Manitoba School Act was amended in accordance with Greenway-Laurier compromise regarding religious instruction.
  • First Winnipeg Rowing Club crew goes to Henley, England, to take part in famous regatta.
  • Aug. 21 – Gateway of Upper Fort Carry was presented to city of Winnipeg by Hudson’s Bay Company.
  • Price of wheat touched $1 per bushel for first time.

1898

  • The town of Gilbert Plains was established.
  • Province issued a charter to Mackenzie and Mann for railway from Winnipeg to Lakehead, (Canadian Northern Rly.)
  • Rodmond Roblin stepped aside to allow Hugh John Macdonald to become Conservative leader.
  • May 29 – “An Eastern friend” contributed $15,000 to fund for Victoria Jubilee Wing of General Hospital, Winnipeg.
  • Sept. 15 – Two “Russian” families arrived, scouts for “an army of immigrants belonging to the religious sect called the Doukhobors.”
  • Nov. 28 – Railway between St. Boniface and Marchand in operation.

1899

  • A training school for French teachers was established in St. Boniface.
  • Town of Grandview was established.
  • Land rush to Swan River Valley started, with towns of Minitonas, Swan River and Bowsman being established.
  • Oct. 14 – Call issued for volunteers to serve in South African War.
  • Oct. 29 – First western Canadian company left for war.
  • Dec. 7 – Greenway government was defeated by Conservatives in provincial election, Conservatives winning 23 seats to Liberals’ 15.

1900

  • Winnipeg General Hospital got its first X-ray machine.
  • Jan. 18 – Work commenced on locks and canal at St. Andrews.
  • June 23 – Hottest day on record since records kept, thermometer standing at 105.5.
  • July 5 – Manitoba, Sgt. A. H. L. Richardson, won Victoria Cross in South Africa.
  • Oct. 29 – Premier Hugh John Macdonald resigned to enter federal politics, Rodmond P. Robin becomes premier.

1901

JANUARY

  • Jan. 2 – George F. Arthur “who recently gained some notice at Morden” was charged in Winnipeg with practicing medicine without a licence. Arthur was subsequently in court on the same charge in Portage la Prairie and Carberry.
  • Jan. 13 – Thousands greeted return of members of Manitoba units, Canadian army, from South Africa.
  • Jan. 17 – New YMCA building opened on Portage Ave., offered gymnasium, pool, auditorium, living quarters.
  • Jan. 22 – Queen Victoria died.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 6 – Details of provincial government’s deal with Northern Pacific, Canadian Northern Railways were revealed.
  • Feb. 11 – Capt. Perry Fall was in Manitoba recruiting men for the South African Constabulary.
  • Feb. 22 – Skating and curling rinks at Miami burned.
  • Feb. 23 – Manitoba Court of King’s Bench ruled the provincial Prohibition Act was invalid.
  • Feb. 27 – Mass meetings at Macgregor, Killarney criticized Premier Roblin’s railway deal.

MARCH

  • Mar. 1 – Recruits from Winnipeg, Shoal Lake, Oak Lake, Miami, Emerson, Peguis, Crystal City, Pilot Mound, Assessippi, Stonewall, Melita and Boissevain sign up for South African constabulary.
  • Mar. 5 – Winnipeg council was told that municipally-owned street and office lighting would cost 19.5 cents per light per night compared to 45 cents in contract with power company.
  • Mar. 7 – Carman delegation urged that town be selected as Agricultural College site.
  • Mar. 15 – Trade Unions, Winnipeg Labor Party urged appointment of a factory inspector as provided for in 1900 Factory Act.
  • Mar. 21 – CPR introduced reduced rate for round trip tickets in Manitoba and Northwest Territories.
  • Mar. 25 – Mayor Senecal of St. Boniface was declared to have forfeited his position due to prolonged absence.
  • Mar. 30 – Federal department of marine and fisheries promised a survey and charts for navigation on Lake Winnipeg

APRIL

  • Apr. 3 – D. Todd found guilty of murder of John Gordon in Winnipeg. “Girl” Crown witness later revealed to have been boy disguised.
  • Apr. 12 – U. of M. Council rejected a petition to allow students to write exams at points outside city, despite W. A. McIntyre’s plea that “This is a provincial university, and if we do not allow this petition we might as well rename it University of Winnipeg.”
  • Apr. 24 – Portage la Prairie streets in darkness due to squabble between city council and electric company.
  • Apr. 29 – May 24 declared official holiday.

MAY

  • May 7 – Gas-well drillers at Melita down to 252 feet.
  • May 15 – “Coal oil” found in 25-foot well on farm of Theodore Schmidt at Morden.
  • May 18 – Winnipeg police magistrate sentenced A. Pillow to three months for theft of three loaves bread, five bottles whisky from farmer’s wagon.
  • May 25 – Northern Pacific Railway transferred its assets to province, which assumed control of rates in Manitoba, Northwestern Ontario.

JUNE

  • June 1 – Winnipeg bicycle licences on sale at 50 cents each “to pay for upkeep of cycle paths.”
  • June 10 – Crews at Teulon started survey for road to Fisher Bay; two new townships to be opened.
  • June 19 – Property-owners on Assiniboine River protested against firm dredging sand from river bed, which caused river banks to subside.
  • June 20 – Trial opened at Carman on charges of bribery in last federal election in Lisgar riding.
  • June 27 – Methodist Sunday Schools held provincial convention at Brandon.

JULY

  • July 4 – Survey completed for railway extension 18 miles west from Waskada; extension west from Wellwood under survey.
  • July 10 – Accidental poisoning at Gilbert Plains brought suggestion that poison bottles should be of distinctive shape.
  • July 15 – Storm at Carberry damaged crops. Man killed by lightning at Boissevain.
  • July 20 – Judge declared federal election in Lisgar riding void, and seat vacant. MP elected at previous election was R. L. Richardson, editor of The Tribune, Liberal. – Winnipeg crew won international eight-oar rowing event at Philadelphia.
  • July 27 – Winnipeg council accepted Andrew Carnegie’s offer to donate $100,000 for public library.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 6 – Canadian Northern Railway promoters W. Mackenzie, D. D. Mann promised new railway to Lakehead would be ready to move 1901 crop.
  • Aug. 16 – Census report from Ottawa showed Manitoba population to be 246,464 (152,506 in 1892) and Winnipeg’s 42,336 (25,639).
  • Aug. 21 – Winnipeg carpenters formed union, went on strike.
  • Aug. 26 – Mayor A. J. Andrews of Winnipeg offered $100 to “anyone who could satisfactorily explain the difference between the two (Liberal and Conservative) parties, the offer good for one month.”

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 7 – Geo. Towns, British rowing champion, defeated Jacob Gaudaur of Canada, world champion in rowing match at Rat Portage (Kenora).
  • Sept. 11 – Much public indignation in Winnipeg over awkward, poorly-designed new letter and parcel slots at Winnipeg Post Office.
  • Sept. 26 – Duke and Duchess of York (later King George V and Queen Mary) arrived in Winnipeg for program of parades, speeches, fireworks.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 1 – W. Mackenzie, D. D. Mann and F. W. Thompson proposed hydro-electric station on Winnipeg River to produce 100,000 horsepower. Winnipeg then was using 5-6,000 hp.
  • Oct. 7 – Duke of York bagged 41 ducks during day of hunting in Lake Manitoba marshes, from base at Poplar Point. Guide was John Atkinson.
  • Oct. 14 – Provincial government indicated Russell, Dauphin constituency changes to give additional member of Legislature.
  • Oct. 16 – Vulcan Iron Works moulders on strike.
  • Oct. 18 – Nicholas F. Davin, K. C., former MP, founder of Regina Leader, committed suicide in old Clarendon Hotel.
  • Oct. 29 – Two men killed in railway accidents at Forest and Whitemouth.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 1 – W. Leeson, Winnipeg, received suspended sentence for breach of “horseshow bylaw.”
  • Nov. 5 – Richard Topping of Stonewall, self-styled inventor of a flying machine, sentenced to 10 days in jail for being drunk.
  • Nov. 9 – Winnipeg tax rate aroused citizen indignation; protesters claimed taxes more than current rentals.
  • Nov. 14 – Dr. George T. Orton, leading physician, died.
  • Nov. 19 – Carman town council, Northern Pacific Railway in heated dispute over NPR location of tracks along main street of town.
  • Nov. 22 – Judicial Committee of Privy Council in London upheld validity of Manitoba prohibition act.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 2 – Adeline Tait of Silver Heights, was killed near St. James cemetery when horse bolted.
  • Dec. 14 – 59 Manitobans, 111 from Northwest Territories departed for duty with South African Constabulary.
  • Dec. 18 – Smallpox outbreak reported in St. Boniface, Ste. Anne and St. Norbert. News story of the time said victims of the disease “were removed to the pest-house.”
  • Dec. 27 – Canadian Pacific Railway and subsidiaries reported sale of western land totalling 1,000,000 acres for more than $3,000,000.
  • Dec. 30 – Last spike driven in new Canadian Northern line from Winnipeg to Lakehead, through Rainy River, Fort Frances.

c-25

Prohibition was big issue facing citizens

1902-3

1902

  • Jan. 8 – Premier Roblin announced new plebiscite on prohibition.
  • Jan. 16 – A “huge” delegation urging enforcement of prohibition legislation, appeared at Legislature.
  • Feb. 18 – Liberal won Lisgar by-election.
  • Mar. 17 – Montreal won Stanley Cup, defeating Winnipeg Victorias two games to one.
  • Mar. 28 – Floods widespread in southern, western areas.
  • Apr. 3 – Referendum result against prohibition, vote being 10,768 for, 16,659 against, with many prohibitionists boycotting the vote.
  • Apr. 24 – Recruiting started in Winnipeg, Brandon and Portage la Prairie for fourth contingent of South African War expedition.
  • May 1 – Fourth contingent recruits left for South Africa, 94 from Winnipeg, 11 from Morden, eight from Carman and four from Deloraine.
  • June 2 – Manitoba half-holiday declared to mark end of war in South Africa.
  • June 10 – Three bridges in Dauphin area wrecked by floods.
  • July 2 – Tugboat Eagle capsized in Nelson River. One man drowned, another saved after spending half hour in submerged cabin.
  • Aug. 7 – Two reckless Winnipeg wheelmen (cyclists) “heavily fined” – $7.70 each. City council considered bylaw to prohibit spitting on streets.
  • Aug. 27 – Unrest reported among Doukhobor settlers in Swan River, Yorkton areas. Refused to keep animals, or use leather or wool.
  • Sept. 17 – Manitoba Methodist conference adopted motion favoring public ownership of vital utilities.
  • Oct. 1 – Test plots of sugar beet were inspected at Gretna, Morden, Pilot Mound, Boissevain, Headingley, Carman and Carberry.
  • Oct. 29 – Doukhobors left homesteads, invaded Yorkton in thousands.
  • Nov. 7 – 21 NWMP arrived in Portage la Prairie to halt Doukhobor march, then at Newdale.
  • Nov. 8 – Police stopped Doukhobor march at Minnedosa. About 450 lodged in town rink. Two days later, protesting members of sect carried on to trains to take them back to Yorkton. Doukhobors revealed cause of march as being disagreement with Canadian marriage laws, homestead rules.
  • Dec. 3 – Farmers at Elva, tired of waiting for boxcars “captured” empty coal train, loaded 19 cars with grain.
  • Dec. 6 – Six hundred attended opening of new Carman school.

1903

  • Jan. 12 – Large meeting at Virden decided to form first Manitoba branch of United Grain Growers.
  • Feb. 4 – Scots curlers visited Winnipeg for bonspiel.
  • Mar. 14 – Court rejected action by North Cypress, Argyle municipalities in test case over right to tax CPR.
  • Apr. 20 – Employees of tailors and furriers shops on strike.
  • May 4 – Federal dept. of fisheries closed Lake Winnipegosis for commercial fishing due to depletion of fish. Settlers still allowed to fish.
  • June 11 – Grand Orange Lodge, holding national meeting in Winnipeg, amended constitution to debar from membership anyone manufacturing or dealing in intoxicating liquors.
  • July 20 – Conservatives won provincial election with 29 seats to 7 for Liberals, five undecided.
  • Aug. 31 – Open wells in Winnipeg ordered closed as typhoid cases increased.
  • Sept. 12 – Manitoba Gazette listed Dec. 1 as date for effective incorporation of village of Killarney.
  • Oct. 5 – Finding of bodies confirmed drowning of Rev. J. McLachlan, six Indians from Berens River, missing three weeks.
  • Nov. 9 – Portage la Prairie vote favored installation of municipal waterworks.
  • Dec. 5 – Morden’s incorporation as a town was published in the Manitoba Gazette, to be effective Jan. 1, 1904.

C -26

Nothing stopped growth

1904

JANUARY

  • Jan. 6 – Normal schools reported three times the usual number enrolling for teacher training, but few men included.
  • Jan. 9 – Force of 25 police raided Winnipeg “houses of ill-fame” district, arrested 89 persons who paid fines totalling $2,200.
  • Jan. 15 – Rev. F. B. DuVal, president of Winnipeg Moral Reform Committee announced money was available to aid “fallen women.”
  • Jan. 20 – Trades and Labor Council opposed suggested amendments to Factory Act.
  • Jan. 22 – Employers favored Factory Act amendments intended to relax restrictions on work conditions.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 4 – Second United Grain Growers convention at Brandon heard president J. W. Scallion make plea for public ownership.
  • Feb. 25 – Mild epidemic of influenza reported from various points in Manitoba, including Winnipeg.

MARCH

  • Mar. 1 – Deloraine was incorporated as a village.
  • Mar. 2 – J. H. Agnew, Virden MLA, joined cabinet as provincial treasurer.
  • Mar. 9 – Archbishop Robert Machray, primate of Canada and second Anglican Bishop of Rupert’s Land died. He had served 40 years in the diocese, having become bishop in 1864 and archbishop in 1875.
  • Mar. 16 – Thomas Lusted, registrar of Rockwood, Manitoba since 1867, prisoner of Louis Riel, member of Legislature 1878-9, died at age of 68.
  • Mar. 24-5 – Blizzard with winds up to 65 miles per hour, zero temperature, 12 inches of snow, swept Manitoba, plugging roads and railways. Neepawa six days without trains.

APRIL

  • Apr. 1 – Canadian Club formed in Winnipeg.
  • Apr. 8 – 125 contractors formed Winnipeg Builder’s Exchange.
  • Apr. 18 – Ministerial Association unanimously approved principle of union of Presbyterian, Methodist and Congregational churches.
  • Apr. 21 – Rapid City Power, Light and Woollen Co., based on the Rapid City Wool Mills which was burned out several years previously, reported excellent prospects for its second year.
  • Apr. 27 – Tug Gertie H. on Red River, hit CPR bridge, burst into flames, set fire to bridge. Impact opened swing span, which sent tug against Louise Bridge which also caught fire. Damage to bridges was $4,000.

MAY

  • May 6 – High water on Assiniboine wrecked Electric Light Company’s dam at Brandon.
  • May 9 – Hartney Manufacturing Co. built new warehouse, announced plans to double capacity of its planning mill.
  • May 31 – P. Lyall Sons, Montreal awarded contract for new CPR hotel and station in Winnipeg, for $1,500,000.

JUNE

  • June 1 – M. McBeath sold Portage la Prairie News to J. J. McCullough, formerly partner in Portage Graphic.
  • June 16 – Big U. S. Investment in Manitoba forecast in water power, meat packing and milling.
  • June 21 – Lac du Bonnet power company organized with Hugh John Macdonald president and Premier Rodmond P. Roblin as one of the directors.
  • June 29 – Bell Telephone Co. announced plans for 10,000 subscriber switchboards in Winnipeg. Existing facilities for 3,800 lines, with 3,450 in use.

JULY

  • July 2 – T. Eaton Co. announced purchase for $500,000 of Portage Ave. site for first western store.
  • July 4 – Seven options taken on other Portage Ave. properties.
  • July 12 – Portage la Prairie had largest Orange parade in history of province – two miles long.
  • July 27 – John Eaton turned first sod for new Eaton store.

AUGUST

  • Aug 4 – Provincial education department officials puzzled by small parcel containing $70 in cash, thrown in through door of deputy minister’s office by unknown person.
  • Aug. 5 – Initial run made by Winnipeg Selkirk and Lake Winnipeg Railway, pulled by steam engine but later electrified.
  • Aug. 31 – Fires destroyed buildings at Emerson, Boissevain.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 1 – Governor General Lord Minto, Lady Minto paid farewell visit to Manitoba on conclusion of term of office.
  • Sept. 9 – CPR announced plans for 3,000 miles of new telegraph line, giving improved service between Manitoba points and Winnipeg, and to Regina and Fort William.
  • Sept. 15 – Heavy snowfall reported at Boissevain. (Whitewater Lake stampede?)
  • Sept. 20 – Black Watch band paid visit to Winnipeg. Eight ex-members of regiment were guests.
  • Sept. 24 – 800 CPR mechanics, blacksmiths, machinists on strike for two cents an hour pay raise. Company offered one cent, said men were lucky as thousands being laid off in other parts of country.
  • Sept. 28 – Three officers of Indian and education department and church missions marooned with five crewmen for four days when tug Fredric struck rock at mouth of Winnipeg River.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 8 – Contract was let for new brick CPR depot at Carberry.
  • Oct. 10 – Public ownership supporters nominated R. L. Richardson, Tribune editor, as federal candidate in Brandon to oppose Minister of Interior Clifford Sifton.
  • Oct. 11 – J. H. Ashdown Block razed by huge fire, four other blocks damaged, 22 firms or offices destroyed in $454,000 fire, Winnipeg’s worst to date.
  • Oct. 19 – Garson and Tyndall quarries provided 100,000 tons of cut stone for new buildings in province.
  • Oct. 28 – Mysterious epidemic declared responsible for deaths of between 15 and 20 Indians at Norway House.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 3 – Federal returning officers in Provencher, Macdonald and Selkirk constituencies arrested for tampering with voters’ lists.
  • Nov. 4 – Laurier’s Liberals won federal election. Manitoba returned six Liberals, two Conservatives, one seat in doubt. Separate schools was big issue of election. – Thomas Greenway, former premier and 25 years in provincial politics, elected for Lisgar, as Liberal.
  • Nov. 22 – Several dozen horses stolen by gang in Cartwright, Pilot Mound areas
  • Nov. 24 – Special force of provincial mounted police sent to southern Manitoba to deal with horse thieving. – Typhoid cases reported in south Winnipeg.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 6 – Thomas Sharpe re-elected mayor of Winnipeg by acclamation.
  • Dec. 7 – Health officials reported 214 cases of typhoid, 14 deaths in Winnipeg during November. Report noted that city area between William Ave. and CPR tracks had 3-4,000 outdoor privies.
  • Dec. 16 – Independent Telephone Co. of Canada asked for incorporation with plans for $2,500,000 network through Manitoba, using dial system. Company wanted freedom from municipal control.
  • Dec. 24 – Sprague Lumber Co., Higgins Ave. offered “from December 24 to December 31 inclusive, to honor all written orders for mill wood signed by the minister or priest of any church in Winnipeg or St. Boniface” to aid the poor.
  • Dec. 28 – The Barnardo Boys’ Home in Russell was quarantined for smallpox. There were 60 to 70 boys resident at the time.
  • Dec. 31 – Severe coal shortage reported in Winnipeg.

c-28

1905

Underground telephone wires were first proposed in 1905

  • Jan. 16 – First Ruthenian Catholic church dedicated in Winnipeg by Archbishop Langevin of St. Boniface, cost $25,000, featured Byzantine architecture.
  • Jan. 27 – Proposed new liquor licensing bill banned free lunches in bars, forbade singing, dancing, music where alcohol served.
  • Feb. 1 – Area residents petitioned for railway to Gimli and Icelandic River.
  • Feb. 10 – Prof. Allan Hazen, New York expert, blamed open privies for typhoid epidemics in Winnipeg.
  • Mar. 2 – Bishop S. P. Matheson chosen as new Archbishop of Rupert’s Land.
  • Mar. 11 – St. Boniface College announce $50,000 plan to double the college’s size.
  • Mar. 16 – Msgr. J. N. Ritchot, prothonotary apostolic, parish priest of St. Norbert since 1862, died aged 80.
  • Mar. 27 – 50,000 lumbermen in Winnipeg, for annual spring breakup with money (average $150 each) for spree.
  • Apr. 4 – Lakehead Boards of Trade suggested Northwestern Ontario join Manitoba.
  • Apr. 26 – Anti-saloon forces won local option votes in Hartney, Gladstone.
  • May 1 – Winnipeg city council discussed Sunday street car operation. Earlier referendum defeated Sunday car proposal.
  • June 12 – All potential power sites on Winnipeg River reported in hands of private companies.
  • June 23 – Winnipeg census, taken for city by Henderson’s Directory, showed Winnipeg with 78,367, and 11,935 habitations; St. Boniface 3,336; Norwood, 1,534 and Louise Bridge (Elmwood) 2,592.
  • July 10 – Timothy Eaton, “Canada’s Napoleon of retail commerce,” arrived in Winnipeg to inspect new store.
  • July 12 – Use of illegal fish nets in Lake Winnipeg, Red River charged. Red R. fishermen were catching goldeye, pike, pickerel, sturgeon, bass and catfish.
  • July 15 – T. Eaton Winnipeg store officially opened. Advertisements headed “Eaton’s Daily Store News” first appeared in Winnipeg papers.
  • Aug. 11 – G. H. Bradbury, president of Manitoba Pressed Brick Co., Beausejour, reported his plant was ready to produce 20,00 bricks daily.
  • Aug. 23 – Landlord fined for breach of Winnipeg health bylaw. Charged with having 65 people living in two “moderate” size houses, with two inadequate bathrooms.
  • Sept. 12 – Game wardens promised a roundup of U.S., local poachers and game law breakers.
  • Oct. 4 – Winnipeg council suppressed health officer’s report, but hospitals revealed 334 cases of typhoid in city.
  • Oct. 12 – The Governor-General, Earl Grey, officially opened Carnegie Library, new St. Boniface college wing and addition to St. Boniface Hospital.
  • Oct. 17 – Dr. R. M. Simpson, chairman of provincial Board of Health, reported 596 cases of typhoid in Winnipeg. Epidemic due to existence of 8,000 outdoor privies, inadequate water supply, dirty sewers.
  • Oct. 23 – Ramsay Phillips Block, Dauphin, burned.
  • Nov. 9 – Grand Jury brought in true bills against Alexander Ayotte. Lawrence Duggan and R. E. A. Leech, federal returning officers for Manitoba constituencies, on charges of tampering with voters’ lists.
  • Nov. 15 – Rev. I. O. Stringer of Whitehorse, Yukon Terr. elected Anglican Bishop of Selkirk.
  • Dec. 13 – Winnipeg voters approved bylaw for municipal gas plant, General Hospital extension; re-elected Mayor Thomas Sharpe for third term.
  • Dec. 26 – Brandon Brewing Co. brewery burned.

c-31

1906

  • Jan. 11 – Provincial Throne Speech forecast corporation and railway taxes, legislation on telephones, incorporation and control of companies, and elections.
  • Jan. 19 – Brandon College asked Legislature to give it powers of a university, under name of Northwestern University.
  • Feb. 7 – King Edward Hotel, Souris, damaged by explosion.
  • Mar. 13 – Selkirk fishermen charged a U.S. combine was fishing out Lake Winnipeg. Most of catch going to U.S.
  • Mar. 29-31 – Street car men on strike in Winnipeg. Mayor Sharpe read Riot Act, troops called out, cars burned. Ministerial Association named two ministers to act as mediators. Public boycotted trams operated by non-union men.
  • Apr. 7 – Tram strike ended, men won one cent an hour raise.
  • Apr. 9 – Grain Exchange planned $250,000 building.
  • May 3 – Two deaths reported as 150 Fort Alexander Indians stricken with measles.
  • May 23 – Happyland, amusement centre on Portage Ave. near present Dominion opened.
  • June 16 – Winnipeg Electric Street Railway Co. turned on power from Winnipeg River plant in Winnipeg.
  • June 25 – Royal Bank of Canada announced opening of Manitoba branches.
  • July 9 – First Sunday cars operated in Winnipeg jammed, on a hot day.
  • Aug. 15 – Cornerstone of new St. Boniface Cathedral was laid.
  • Aug. 30 – Largest ship on Lake Winnipeg, the Princess, of Selkirk, foundered in gale. Six drowned and 16 rescued by steamer City of Selkirk.
  • Oct. 6 – Winnipeg jail not big enough for number of persons arrested for drunkenness, so 13 prisoners were freed.
  • Nov. 12 – Survey of Shoal Lake, Lake of the Woods for water supply started.
  • Nov. 20 – T. Eaton Co. announced expansion plans.
  • Nov. 29 – New Normal School opened in Winnipeg.
  • Dec. 3 – Manitoba Grain Growers Association charged number of grain dealers in Winnipeg Grain Exchange with operating a combine to restrain trade.
  • Dec. 31 – Health authorities reported Winnipeg typhoid cases during year totalled 1,160, with 109 deaths. In 1905, cases numbered 1,606, with 138 deaths.

c-34

1907

JANUARY

  • Jan 3 – Neepawa out of coal, wood, reported one-foot snowfall and four feet of snow in the Riding Mountain, hindering woodcutting.
  • Jan. 11 – Grain men accused of conspiracy to restrain trade were committed for trial by higher court.
  • Jan. 15 – Liberal leader Ed Brown announced policy favoring government-owned grain elevators.
  • Jan. 30 – Grain Exchange told government it would rather have its charter cancelled than amended.
  • Jan. 31 – Two schools closed in Brandon due to fuel shortage.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 3 – Blizzard tied up railways across province; CPR advertised for 500 men to shovel snow.
  • Feb. 7 – Winnipeg relief office besieged by people of all income groups trying to buy fuel.
  • Feb. 11 – Deer Lodge, old hotel west of city built in 1858, burned.
  • Feb. 12 – Building trades began movement for eight-hour working day.
  • Feb. 16 – Legislature dissolved with election set for March 7.

MARCH

  • Mar. 4 – Sermon on politics and prohibition at Fort Rouge United Church interrupted by angry member of congregation objecting to anti-government stand of minister, Rev. J. H. Morgan.
  • Mar. 7 – Roblin government re-elected with 25 seats to 13 for opposition, with two seats deferred.
  • Mar. 7 – Votes were being bought for $5 each in a North Winnipeg church basement and beer was being served by politicians. The Tribune said the electorate was being “debauched.”
  • Mar. 18 – Six trainloads of immigrants from Britain and Ontario arrived in Manitoba.
  • Mar. 26 – Salaries of top civic employees and department heads were $4,000 annually.

APRIL

  • Apr. 6 – Immigration to Prairies mushroomed.
  • Apr. 9 – Rural communities were running short of provisions as result of no trains from Winnipeg for eight days. Tie-up blamed on a lack of engines.

JULY

  • July 15 – Railways put on excursions to bring rural residents to the industrial exhibition in Winnipeg.
  • July 27 – Doukhobors marched on Winnipeg.
  • July 29 – Winnipeg spending estimates totalled $1,501,215 and the taxes were at 16 mills.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 5 – CPR moved its mainline to run through Molson, cutting off from daily service stations on the former mainline which included Birds Hill, Gonor, Selkirk, Garson, Tyndall, Beausejour and Sinnot.
  • Oct. 9 – Winnipeg Paint and Glass Company struck by fire for a loss of $250,000.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 15 – Total crop returns for the season amounted to $128,000,000 compared to $107,000,000 the previous year.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 23 – A U.S. officer seized the bridle of a horse driven by an Emerson farmer and “kidnapped” the man by placing him under arrest and taking him into the U.S. for selling barley in North Dakota at a better price than in Canada.
  • Dec. 30 – Agreement reached on government takeover of Bell Telephone in Manitoba.

1908

JANUARY

  • Jan. 15 – Provincial government took over Bell Telephone Company.
  • Jan. 29 – Legislature law amendments committee discussed automobile speed limit and suggested that drivers should be permitted to drive as fast as they were able unless they were within 30 yards of another vehicle when the speed limit would be six miles an hour.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 15 – Manitoba Social Services council set up at YMCA.
  • Feb. 25 – St. Boniface incorporated as a city.

JUNE

  • June 20 – First piles driven for Fort Garry Hotel.
  • June 30 – Grand jury said the provincial jail was in deplorable condition, that it should only house 48 prisoners yet was handling 81.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 1 – Crowd lined up for all-night wait for opening of land office and handing out of homestead grants.
  • Sept. 5 – CPR announced building of stockyard and packing plant in St. Boniface in co-operation with Swifts Company.
  • Sept. 21 – First Grand Trunk Pacific train bound for Edmonton left Winnipeg amid great fanfare.
  • Sept. 21 – New main post office was opened in Winnipeg.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 6 – A Commission charged with setting up the University of Manitoba decided to visit universities in Eastern Canada and the U.S. to form guidelines.
  • Oct. 17 – An 18-yar-old fireman was condemned for not keeping a proper watch on the steamer Premier which burned at Warrens Landing Aug. 6 with the loss of eight lives. The captain and engineer lost their certificates.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 1 – A total of 90,000 cattle passed through Winnipeg facilities for export at $48 to $50 a head – a record year.
  • Dec. 7 – J. C. Eaton announced the family store on Portage Avenue planned to start construction, as soon as the weather improved, of a warehouse at Hargrave and Graham Avenues.
  • Dec. 9 – W. Sanford Evans mayor of Winnipeg.

c-35

1909

  • Apr. 1 – Fifty land-seekers were on hand for opening up of odd-numbered sections northwest of Winnipeg in Poplar Point area. George Lenereux, La Broquerie, first to file.
  • Apr. 7 – Winnipeg Builders’ Exchange and building trade unions reached agreement on wage scales as big construction year was forecast.
  • Apr. 10 – Eight-team Western Canada Baseball League ready to open, with Winnipeg promised 64 home games. Brandon also in league.
  • Apr. 30 – D. A. Ross, MLA, gave glowing account of future of Beausejour glass factory, employing 40 men.
  • May 5 – Plans approved for Ninette Sanatorium contract, building to be ready October 1.
  • May 6 – Commission inquiring into charges on Lake Winnipeg fisheries held opening session.
  • May 27 – Brandon firm awarded Ninette Sanatorium contract, building to be ready October 1.
  • May 29 – Winnipeg council studies plan for bridge across Assiniboine River at Donald St.
  • June 9 – Christopher Fahrni of Gladstone reported that 60,000 acres in the area had been leased for oil exploration.
  • June 14 – First Grand Trunk Pacific Railway train left Winnipeg for Alberta.
  • June 15 – Manitoba farmers started practical engineering course at Manitoba Agricultural College.
  • July 8 – CPR installed “telegraphone” system between Brandon and Winnipeg to replace telegraphic key communication.
  • July 12 – Investigation demanded into “red light” district of North Winnipeg, followed up by numerous police raids.
  • July 22 – Winnipeg opened school grounds as play areas. School areas formerly were closed in the summer and after school hours.
  • Aug. 13 – Steamer Wolverine brought record fish catch of 162 tons from Warrens Landing and other Lake Winnipeg points.
  • Aug. 18 – Grain crop estimated at 110,000,000 bushels at about 90 cents a bushel.
  • Aug. 19 – Drop in flour prices averted an increase in bread prices to seven cents from six.
  • Aug. 26 – Lord Strathcona officiated at ceremonies inaugurating the Strathcona Horse regiment.
  • Sept. 10 – American farm immigrants planning to settle in Manitoba brought $1,000,000 into the province. When checked by officials their “money was their credentials.”
  • Nov. 8 – Standard Bank opened at 325 Portage Avenue with $2,000,000 capital. – Locks completed at St. Andrews on the Red River.
  • Nov. 24 – Water main break at Lac du Bonnet power house cut off all hydro to Winnipeg, closing factories and leaving streetcars stranded. Power was rationed for several days until the damage was repaired.

c-36

1910

  • Jan 2 – Loss in fire at Gilbert Plains grist mill was $54,000.
  • Jan. 11 – Workman’s Compensation Board received protest from Trades and Labor Council against inclusion of farm laborers in compensation act’s coverage.
  • Jan. 29 – Hyland Navigation Co. planned to build S. S. Bonnitoba, sister ship to lake excursion boat Winnitoba, at Selkirk.
  • Feb. 1 – A. E. Bullock, Brandon contractor, revealed plans for a $25,000 apartment block on 14 Ave., and for two other blocks worth $75,000 each.
  • Feb. 8 – Manitoba bonspiel entries set a new record of 187 rinks.
  • Feb. 19 – C. P. Walker purchased the Winnipeg Theatre.
  • Feb. 23 – Graduates of Wesley College claimed denominational colleges were inadequate for university education.
  • Feb. 25 – Provincial architect Samuel Hooper proposed to build two wings, at a price of $400,000 on old Legislature Building.
  • Mar. 5 – George Lawrence, Killarney MLA, forecast development of proposed government grain elevators into shipping terminal on Hudson Bay.
  • Mar. 16 – Winnipeg YMCA was making preparations to turn its building at Smith and Portage over to Henry Birks jewelry company.
  • Mar. 24 – City council decided to end the informal policy of segregating houses of prostitution.
  • Mar. 31 – Dog licences brought $10,000 to city treasury.
  • Apr. 5 – Provincial Liberal party adopted compulsory education as part of its new policy.
  • Apr. 8 – Largest ship on Lake Winnipeg, S. S. Wolverine heavily damaged by fire in Selkirk dry dock.
  • Apr. 11 – George B. Somerville won his long-draw-out legal battle for a liquor licence in Rivers.
  • Apr. 19 – Dr. Lee DeForest demonstrated wireless telephone with conversation between Eaton’s Store and Royal Alex Hotel.
  • Apr. 21 – Newspapers noted butter famine, with price up to 40 or 50 cents a pound.
  • May 2 – Winnipeg building permits in first four months of year more than total figure for same period of two previous years, $5,000,000.
  • May 6 – Winnipeg considered a $2,000,000 plan for new city hall.
  • May 7 – King Edward VII died.
  • May 13 – Alexander Graham Bell visited Winnipeg, declared aviation was now an established fact.
  • May 21 – Special edition of The Tribune was devoted to Transcona, “Industrial Metropolis Springing Up.”
  • June 2 – Winnipeg ratepayers approved $700,000 bylaw supporting Selkirk Centennial exhibition, isolation hospital, tuberculosis hospital and morgue, rejected General Hospital expansion.
  • June 7 – Work started on new Canadian Northern Rly. Hotel, station in Brandon. Cost $150,000.
  • June 21 – Provincial election announced for July 11.
  • June 24 – Provincial commission recommended setting-up of provincially owned and operated abattoir.
  • July 6 – Tribune editorial commented on U.S. claim that Hudson Bay and Hudson Strait were international waters.
  • July 7 – Winnipeg rowing team won Steward’s Cup at Henley, England Regatta.
  • July 11 – Roblin government returned in election, with 28 seats to opposition’s 13.
  • July 8 – Prairie fire on Dominion St., west of Winnipeg, threatened homes.
  • Aug. 2 – SS Amelia Mac, 70 feet long, was first steel boat launched for river and lake traffic in Manitoba.
  • Aug. 3 – The Governor-General, Earl Grey, was in Winnipeg to start long northern trip by canoe to Norway House.
  • Aug. 17 – Gabriel Lafournaise, 92, first student to register at first session of St. Boniface College, attended college reunion.
  • Aug. 19 – Mmembers of Winnipeg Builders’ Exchange locked out 600 bricklayers over unofficial strike of 13 men.
  • Aug. 29 – Controller R. D. Waugh proposed major changes in Winnipeg’s municipal government.
  • Sept. 12 – Winnipeg bricklayers returned to work on employers’ terms.
  • Sept. 14 – Province bought 500 acres for $175,000 in Fort Garry as site for new agricultural college.
  • Sept. 20 – Health officials said scarlet fever epidemic in Winnipeg, with 90 cases, hospitals full.
  • Oct. 1 – Winnipeg was site for Social Purity Conference, with church, social service workers concentrating on ending prostitution in Winnipeg.
  • Oct. 11 – Manitoba asked Ottawa government for federal property then used as army barracks, on Broadway for new legislative building.
  • Oct. 13 – Dr. R. M. Simpson, of Winnipeg, president of International Association of Public Health Officers, spoke to an Ottawa meeting about pollution of Manitoba’s waterways.
  • Oct. 28 – Grain Growers’ Associations of western Canada proposed that they should build, operate railway to Hudson Bay.
  • Nov. 2 – Indians of St. Reserve, under ex-chief Asham, charged bribery and corruption in the band’s transfer to Fisher River Reserve.
  • Nov. 4 – Change of wind, help of Dauphin, Grandview fire brigades saved Gilbert Plains from complete destruction by fire.
  • Nov. 8 – Selkirk Board of Trade protested strongly against pollution of Red River by sewage from Winnipeg.
  • Nov. 12 – Brandon, Portage la Prairie Boards of Trade supported Winnipeg Board of Trade’s strong resolution for railway to Hudson Bay.
  • Nov. 23 – Inquiry into vice in Winnipeg opened with Mr. Justice H. A. Robson presiding.
  • Dec. 9 – Victor Oliver of Deleau, found unconscious, badly frozen after bolting team stranded him on country road.
  • Dec. 12 – Winnipeg building permits totalled $15,000,000.
  • Dec. 16 – Street car men on strike in Winnipeg.
  • Dec. 30 – Thermometer read 42 below zero.
  • Dec. 31 – Winnipeg street railway strike settled.

c- 37

1911

  • Jan. 3 – Petition filed for investigation into election of Mayor Sanford Evans of Winnipeg.
  • Jan. 7 – Opium den discovered in Winnipeg and occupants ordered to leave the city.
  • Jan. 14 – Judge H. A. Robson reported on vice in Winnipeg.
  • Feb. 1 – Retail butchers warned of meat and poultry deterioration by cold storage (freezing) methods.
  • Feb. 6 – Provincial government announced a normal school would be built in Brandon.
  • Feb. 11 – Winnipeg led other cities in Canada in the value of building permits.
  • Mar. 9 – Manitoba farmers solidly backed reciprocity trade agreement with the United States.
  • Mar. 11 – J. W. Scallion supported as proposed leader of a Manitoba Independent Party, discussed at Virden.
  • Mar. 18 – Protest against Mayor Evans’ election was dropped.
  • Apr. 4 – Survey of road from Winnipeg to Winnipeg Beach completed as far as Selkirk.
  • Apr. 7 – Winnipeg city council decided to enforce a ruling preventing the dumping of refuse in the Red River.
  • May 2 – Direct line from Winnipeg to Hudson’s Bay assured by promoters.
  • May 6 – Hudson Bay Company announced plans to build large department store at Portage and Colony.
  • May 18 – Central Garage on Water St. burned for loss of $250,000, including the loss of 60 cars stored inside.
  • June 9 – Census commissioner Samuel Laidlaw threatened legal action against women who refuse to give their age in the door-to-door count.
  • June 15 – Railway commission ordered subway to be built at the CNR Main St. crossing north of the Norwood Bridge.
  • June 28 – Railway officials estimated 40,000 farm hands would be required for harvesting a crop forecast to hit 200,000,000 bushels.
  • July 6 – Fire destroyed grandstands at the exhibition grounds.
  • July 12 – Exhibition opened on schedule with new stands completed by work of 200 carpenters.
  • July 15 – Census estimated Winnipeg population at 160,000.
  • Aug. 1 – D. C. Cameron sworn in as Manitoba Lieutenant-Governor.
  • Aug. 7 – Union station (Canadian Northern and Grand Trunk Pacific Railways) opened.
  • Sept. 8 – Boyd building under construction at Portage and Edmonton.
  • Sept. 13 – Angry posse of up to 400 men, who left harvesting, hunt the Manitou region for abductor of Snowflake schoolteacher Gladys Price. There was fear abductor would be lynched when found.
  • Sept. 10 – Snowflake kidnapper arrested at Hannah, N.D. and jailed to await return to Manitoba for trial.
  • Sept. 20 – Crescent Creamery announced plans for a $250,000 plant at Ellice and Burnell.
  • Sept. 20 – Estimated cost of planned construction of Hotel Fort Garry was $1,500,000.
  • Oct. 9 – First spike driven by Mayor Fleming signalling start of construction of Brandon’s street railway system.
  • Oct. 16 – Point du Bois electric plant opened and 55,000,000 volts came on line to Winnipeg. Young Gurney Evans (later finance minister in the Conservative cabinet of Walter Weir) threw the switch.
  • Dec. 21 – Rural areas complained Winnipeg was growing by getting a larger share of the immigrants moving to the province.
  • Dec. 26 – Henry Birks and Sons planned building on Portage on the site of the YMCA which planned to move to Vaughan St. in 1912.
  • Dec. 31 – Winnipeg bank earnings for first time topped billion-dollar mark at $1,172,762.

c- 37

1912

  • Jan. 4 – Judicial commission inquiring into St. Peter’s Indian Reserve transfer produced majority report which held that trickery had been used, and found other technical objections to the manner in which transfer was brought about.
  • Jan. 12 – Statistics produced to show that city-owned Hydro’s three cent light rate was saving citizens of Winnipeg money, at rate of $90,000 a year.
  • Jan. 16 – Directory census showed Greater Winnipeg’s population as 227,339.
  • Feb. 1 – Inquiry opened under Judge Prud’homme of charges of municipal graft in St. Boniface.
  • Feb. 3 – Illegal practices in connection with Winnipeg city land purchases subject of inquiry by Judge Myers.
  • Feb. 6 – Manitoba Telephone Commission opened hearings on protests against phone service rates.
  • Mar. 5 – Manitoba Telephone Commission asked government to postpone increase in tax rates
  • Mar. 9 – Arson suspected in fire at Radford Block, Main and Sutherland, Winnipeg in which seven men, including two firemen died. There were 14 injured, including five firemen and two policemen.
  • Mar. 14 – 1,200 delegates from 70 Manitoba parishes discussed formation of a new political party of work for separate schools.
  • Mar. 28 – Manitoba Power Co. bill in Legislature bitterly opposed by Winnipeg council, many citizens.
  • April 5 – Manitoba Power bill sponsors withdrew legislation, as result of city-wide public protests.
  • April 15 – White Star line Titanic sunk on first Atlantic crossing.
  • April 16 – Six Winnipeggers on Titanic sunk on first Atlantic crossing.
  • April 25 – Telephone commission said rural rates too low, annual loss per line was $14.
  • May 1 – Winnipeg Musicians Union planned memorial concert to raise funds for dependents of musicians who died on Titanic.
  • May 2 – Brandon offered membership in Central International Baseball League with Winnipeg, Duluth, Superior, Virginia and Grand Forks.
  • May 8 – First report of rats in Winnipeg received by health officials.
  • May 15 – Agreement with Ottawa became official, enlarging Manitoba to present size, giving ports on Hudson Bay.
  • May 20 – Three young people drowned at Harts Lake, near Minnedosa.
  • June 4 – Percy E. Hagel, Winnipeg barrister, disbarred for nine months for unprofessional conduct in property sale.
  • June 24 – Temperature was 94.8 degrees.
  • June 29 – 3,000 carpenters out on strike for pay increase to 55 cents an hour, maximum 50-hour week.
  • July 8 – Heavy hail storm at Altona damaged crops to extent of 100,000 bushels.
  • July 10 – Winnipeg Industrial Exhibition opened by Governor-General, Earl of Connaught and Princess Patricia.
  • July 20 – Grain Growers’ Grain Co. completed deal with province to take over provincially-owned grain elevators.
  • Aug. 7 – Ottawa announced Port Nelson confirmed as choice for Hudson Bay port, line to run Saskatoon to Nelson via The Pas with shops, yards at Nelson and The Pas.
  • Aug. 10 – Winnipeg taxi rates criticized as highest of major cities.
  • Aug. 12 – Rats reported increasing in city, on river banks, in stables.
  • Aug. 14 – Circus hands ran amok at Emerson, shots were fired, but no-one injured and no arrests made.
  • Sept. – Water expert advised Public Utilities Commission that 90-mile aqueduct from Shoal Lake “best, not cheapest” way of solving Winnipeg water problem.
  • Sept. 13 – Calgary gas firm offered to build pipeline to Manitoba to serve Brandon, Portage la Prairie and Winnipeg.
  • Sept. 16 – Provincial roads branch issued pamphlet on planning, financing, building and maintaining roads for guidance of municipal officials.
  • Oct. 2 – Farm women and children worked in field due to shortage of harvest help.
  • Oct. 4 – Committee of prominent Winnipeggers asked Hudson’s Bay Co. for old Fort Garry gate, land so that fort could be rebuilt as a museum.
  • Oct. 29 – Fierce blizzard tied up rail traffic throughout province.
  • Nov. 1 – Alloway and Champion, long a privately-owned Winnipeg banking house, became a joint stock company.
  • Nov. 2 – Isaac Mueller, aged over 90, one of leaders who supervised first Mennonite migration to Manitoba, died at Gretna.
  • Nov. 11 – Portage la Prairie postmaster, W. W. Miller, 66, a pioneer of the district, died.
  • Nov. 15 – Winnipeg Tribune bought Graham and Smith site for new building at cost of $100,000.
  • Dec. 3 – Dr. J. A. MacLean installed as president of University of Manitoba.
  • Dec. 5 – Brandon’s new police chief Beatty cracked down on traffic offences, many citizens, including Mayor Fleming being summonsed for such misdemeanors as faulty automobile lights.
  • Dec. 21 – The Radial Railway bought 10 acres of land in Portage la Prairie for shops, planned service to Winnipeg.

c- 38

1913

  • Jan. 6 – Famed actress Sarah Bernhardt arrived in Winnipeg for performance at the Orpheum.
  • Jan. 20 – Grand Trunk Pacific shops officially opened in Transcona.
  • Mar. 1 – Tribune unveiled plans for a new building on Smith and Graham.
  • Mar. 19 – Grand Trunk mounted a “See Canada First” campaign to promote use of its lines.
  • May 1 – A referendum to build a water supply system for Winnipeg utilizing Shoal Lake water passed a vote of 2,236 to 369.
  • May 28 – Gold rush on to stake claims in Rice Lake area on east side of Lake Winnipeg.
  • June 2 – Telephone operators got a $6 a month raise, but had to work an extra half hour daily. Wages prior to the announcement ranged from $24 a month for beginners to $40 for experienced operators.
  • June 14 – Manitoba Rolling Mills planned to locate new plant in Selkirk.
  • July 3 – Labor criticized unrestricted entry of immigrants to Manitoba.
  • July 4 – Civic officials worried about slum conditions developing in Winnipeg.
  • July 9 – Grand jury minority report called for compulsory education after finding that many Manitoba-born residents were unable to speak English.
  • Aug. 9 – Exhibition run in conjunction with a stampede. Hotel accommodation for visitors scarce.
  • Aug. 14 – Union stockyards in St. Boniface officially opened.
  • Sept. 10 – Plans readied for new wide street between Portage Avenue and Broadway to end at new Legislative buildings.
  • Oct. 7 – Passengers escaped injury when engine hit open switch near Letellier and turned somersault, dragging other coaches off the track.
  • Oct. 17 – Merchants protested abandonment of exhibition, suggested a commission take it over and Winnipeg finance the costs.
  • Nov. 10 – Macdonald constituency election declared invalid as result of “corrupt practices” by agents of winner Alex Morrison.
  • Dec. 4 – Plum Coulee bank manager shot in daring robbery in which bandits escaped with $4,000.
  • Dec. 10 – John Krafchenko arrested in Winnipeg after mammoth hunt by police. Part of stolen money found in his room.
  • Dec. 10 – Fort Garry Hotel officially opened.

c -40

War found militia ready

1914

  • Jan. 2 – Manitoba Telephone system recorded surplus of $30,000 for 1913.
  • Jan. 10 – Jack Krafchenko, accused of murder of bank manager H.W. Arnold of Plum Coulee escaped from provincial jail. Reward of $5,000 offered.
  • Jan. 19 – Krafchenko recaptured, four men arrested in connection with his escape, including city policeman, lawyer Percy Hagel.
  • Jan. 26 – Lord Strathcona (Donald A. Smith) died in England.
  • Feb. 9 – Pantages Theatre opened in Winnipeg.
  • Feb. 25 – Manitoba Association of School Trustees voted for compulsory education law, English only as language of instruction.
  • Mar. 9 – Two new lighthouses built at mouth of Red River to aid navigation.
  • Mar. 17 – Night telephone operator Ethel Poynter of Pilot Mound woke in smoke-filled room, gave alarm despite near-asphyxiation, and saved building from destruction.
  • Mar. 24 – Hagel sentenced to three years for conspiracy, John Westlake to two years for assisting Krafchenko to escape.
  • Apr. 7 – Ald. Davidson, Frank Kerr and T. A. D. Bevington of civic censoring division ordered vaudeville act entitled “Vice” deleted from Pantages Theatre program.
  • Apr. 9 – Krafchenko found guilty at Morden assizes, of murder of H. W. Arnold.
  • Apr. 13 – Anglican congregations met to discuss giving women members right to vote on parochial matters.
  • June 22 – Brandon reported three militia regiments were in training at Camp Sewell.
  • June 29 – Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo reported.
  • July 7 – Magistrate H. J. Macdonald rules all cases concerning women in his court would be in camera, and urged need for special women’s court.
  • July 16 – Manitoba hotelmen petitioned to increase beer price from five cents.
  • July 28 – War in Europe, many recent immigrants from Germany, Russian, Austria called up by former homelands.
  • Aug. 6 – Crowds attacked Austrian consulate and smashed up German Club in Winnipeg.
  • Aug. 13 – Labor leaders tried, failed to interview Premier Roblin on subject of pay owing by Thomas Kelly, contractor, to men working on new Legislative Building.
  • Aug. 25 – Winnipeg offered to pay half cost of typhoid inoculations if province would match the offer.
  • Sept. 4 – Wives of soldiers on active service told they would get $20 monthly, in addition to assigned pay from husbands.
  • Sept. 22 – Work resumed on new Legislative Building after two-month stoppage.
  • Oct. 17 – Pumpkin, tomato and strawberry plants blooming and new peas on vines at Stonewall.
  • Nov. 1 – New government hospital and school opened at Norway House.
  • Nov. 7 – NWMP Constable Ludbell drove train 170 miles north of The Pas to bring out 250 railway construction men who were on strike, without food, shelter in two-foot snow.
  • Dec. 5 – Magistrate Hugh John Macdonald declared sale of bread on Sunday to be breach of Lord’s Day Act.
  • Dec. 14 – William Gunn, son of original Selkirk settlers, died at age of 87. He was born 1827 in West Kildonan and since 1882 had lived at Springfield.

c-40

Casualty lists brought battle nearer

1915

  • Feb. 26 – Portage la Prairie schools led province in school attendance, with 73.9 per cent average. Brandon 71.25, Winnipeg 70.5, St. Boniface 70.3.
  • Feb. 27 – Canadian Northern Rly. Station agent at Swan River found guilty of stealing 200 tons coal from railway but given suspended sentence when it was shown he had given coal to needy families in area.
  • Mar. 1 – Winnipeg Ski Club held its first tournament.
  • Mar. 9 – Manitoba auto licence fees increased from $5 a year to $10. In 1915, 9,000 licences were issued.
  • Mar. 12 – Four German prisoners-of-war escaped from Brandon Fair Building where they were interned.
  • Mar. 29 – Sgt. William White, killed in action, first Brandon war casualty.
  • Mar. 30 – Death of Donald Gunn reported. Gunn, born in Kildonan in 1833, built Old Kildonan Church, many homes, had lived in Dauphin, Makinak for 20 years.
  • Mar. 31 – Liberal in Legislature A. B. Hudson moved resolution charging negligence and fraud in construction of new Legislature Building. Liberals made direct petition to Lieutenant Governor Sir. Douglas Cameron for investigation.
  • Apr. 1 – Premier Roblin first refused investigation of fraud charge, then, on order of the lieutenant–governor agreed to inquiry.
  • Apr. 12 – Rev. R. B. McElheran, St. Matthews Anglican church said “shooting is too good a fate for grafting war contractors.”
  • Apr. 17 – Grading under way on Hudson Bay Railway for 290 miles north-east of The Pas.
  • Apr. 27 – Special commission on Legislature Building fraud charges started first session.
  • May 1 – Bread price increased to seven cents a loaf in Brandon.
  • May 7 – Legislature Building commission presented interim report showing definite evidence of fraud.
  • May 12 – Premier Roblin resigned.
  • May 13 – Liberal leader T. C. Norris sworn in as premier.
  • May 20 – Provincial department of agriculture first used automobiles to send lecturers on farm methods around province.
  • June 9 – Mrs. G. Buason appointed by government as commissioner to take affidavits. First female appointment in Manitoba.
  • June 19 – Concrete at bottom of legislative building footings found inferior.
  • June 21 – Winnipeg offered a bounty of 10 cents a rat delivered to the incinerator in July and August.
  • July 9 – James Ashdown, former mayor, demanded to be heard at Legislature inquiry to clear his name from earlier testimony that he was involved in a $25,000 Liberal slush fund.
  • July 12 – Testimony by Premier T. C. Norris and Mr. Ashdown discredited that of former attorney-general James Howden.
  • July 30 – Commission investigating Legislature building contracts discredited Howden.
  • Aug. 5 – City regulated speed limits of ambulances and police patrols that unnecessarily speed at 20 to 25 miles an hour. Such vehicles limited to 10 to 15 miles an hour in business areas and 15 to 20 in residential and outlying areas.
  • Aug. 6 – T. C. Norris and his Liberals won 38 of 46 seats in the Provincial election. The Tories got five sets and independents three.

c–42

Norris government planned wide range of reforms

1916

  • Jan. 5 – Norris government considering inclusion in suffrage bill the right for women to run for office.
  • Jan. 12 – Two work trains collided in blowing snow one mile east of Brandon, killing 14 and injuring 40.
  • Jan. 17 – Syndicate Block on Rosser Ave. in Brandon burned, killing three and injuring many others; some jumped from windows.
  • Jan. 24 – Winnipeg population at 239,079.
  • Feb. 5 – French and other groups to retain language rights in Manitoba under “bilingualism” of the day.
  • Feb. 8 – “Black hole” dungeon abolished for use in provincial jail – the only prison reform planned this year.
  • Feb. 10 – Provincial government hinted income tax might be introduced in 1917.
  • Feb. 12 – Opposition member of legislature wanted bilingualism abolished.
  • Feb. 18 – Graft charged in Roblin administration road deals.
  • Mar. 1 – Premier Norris told church leaders to stay out of bilingualism debate.
  • Mar. 13 – Manitoba voted in favor of prohibition, effective June 1.
  • Apr. 3 – Soldiers confined to barracks and forbidden to enter bars after weekend riot between the military and Winnipeg police.
  • Apr. 17 – The battle of St. Eloi killed 23 Winnipeggers and wounded 80.
  • Apr. 24 – Red River reached height of 24 feet, causing flooding of sidewalks on Main St. south of River Ave. and water to extend a mile beyond Tache Ave. from Water St.
  • May 12 – Former prisoner complained about conditions in Stony Mountain which resulted in call for nationwide prison reform.
  • May 27 – Provincial cabinet turned down a petition of 1,000 signatures seeking the release of contractor Thomas Kelly from charges in legislature scandal.
  • May 31 – Every bar in the province closed at 7 p.m. for June 1 prohibition.
  • June 8 – Retailers’ convention labelled as “socialism” a workmen’s compensation law which made them responsible for accidents.
  • June 14 – Presbyterians voted for union with Methodists and Baptists.
  • June 30 – Contractor Thomas Kelly convicted of theft and conspiracy in legislature building scandal.
  • July 7 – Druggists permitted to sell port wine only by prescription.
  • July 11 – Shoal Lake water aqueduct estimated to cost a total of $14,668.000.
  • Aug. 3 – Winnipeg board of control had trouble with its female employees who refuse to give their ages for pension purposes.
  • Aug. 4 – Winnipeg Women’s Volunteer reserve trained at Camp Preparedness near Gimli in case they were called as last line of defence. It was the first women’s war camp in Canada.
  • Aug. 9 – Bread price climbed to six cents a loaf while wheat prices at the grain exchange soared to $1.51 a bushel.
  • Aug. 14 – Wheat crop hit by frost and rust and estimated at 75 per cent of previous year’s harvest.
  • Sept. 6 – Jury voted nine to three for guilty verdict against Roblin and his ministers involved in legislature building scandal. New trial necessary.
  • Sept. 9 – Mile-long cracks discovered in Shoal Lake aqueduct.
  • Sept. 16 – Tribune opened its columns for views of readers on increase in cost of living.
  • Sept. 23 – Three editors and one reporter were jailed for contempt of a commission investigating graft in building the agricultural college.
  • Sept. 27 – Figures showed cost of living jumped as much as 75 per cent in last 12 months.
  • Oct. 10 – Editors released when a judge ruled the commissioner exceeded his powers.
  • Oct. 13 – No cases on court docket because lawyers were “leery” of Friday the 13th.
  • Oct. 14 – Housewives urged a probe into rising prices, complaining seven cent bread is too high.
  • Nov. 9 – Wheat hit record high of $2 a bushel in trading on the grain exchange in the face of orders from Britain.
  • Nov. 10 – Provincial government set up a group to investigate high food prices.
  • Nov. 20 – Contactor Thomas Kelly sentenced to 2½ years in Stony Mountain for his part in legislature building scandals.
  • Nov. 21 – Forty cents a day was enough to pay for food, some letter-writers claimed.
  • Dec. 7 – A baker laid the blame for the high cost of bread on gambling in the grain market.
  • Dec. 16 – D. G. Dyson elected mayor of Winnipeg with 16-vote margin.

c-44

Wheat prices, cost of living much in public eye

1917

  • Jan. 5 – Alderman F. H. Davidson named mayor after recount of Winnipeg votes.
  • Jan. 30 – Trial of Sir Rodmond Roblin and his former cabinet minister postponed because of his ill health.
  • Feb. 3 – Manitoba Government Telephones operators planned to organize a union.
  • Feb. 6 – Winnipeg population was at 247,367.
  • Feb. 8 – Troop train wrecked a mile east of Brandon, 20 injured.
  • Feb. 9 – Bill planned for legislative session to set up a board of nine governors to oversee University of Manitoba.
  • Feb. 28 – Governor-General, the Duke of Devonshire, visited Manitoba.
  • Mar. 6 – A Teulon merchant said there was a conspiracy among laborers to force farmers to pay up to $5 a day at harvest time.
  • Mar. 27 – Alderman A. Skaletar resigned after being named in a report on fraudulent voting in the civic election.
  • Mar. 28 – Merchants and dealers absolved of any blame for high cost of living. Commission blamed limited supply and great demand for goods.
  • Apr. 26 – Isaac Pitblado named chairman of nine-member board of governors for University of Manitoba.
  • Apr. 28 – A board was set up to censor deals in grain exchange as price soared to $2.86. Only legitimate sales were to be allowed, no speculation.
  • May 7 – Girls hired to replace striking electric meter readers.
  • May 9 – Electric workers, meter readers, strike ends.
  • May 16 – Women’s army against waste organized to conserve food for the war effort.
  • May 22 – Great rush to join army as conscription debate continued at Ottawa.
  • May 26 – A total of 50 female employees at Woolworth’s Portage Ave. store struck for a minimum wage of $8 a week. Girls were earning $6.
  • June 26 – A total of 800 men, members of building trades unions, went on strike and tied up all construction in Winnipeg.
  • July 6 – Milkmen went on strike.
  • July 16 – Special train brought burned boy from Carberry to Winnipeg for treatment within an hour. Boy died later in General Hospital.
  • July 20 – Austrian strikers at construction of million-bushel grain elevator in Transcona arrested by military for precipitating a near riot.
  • Aug. 7 – Women attending convention of Western Liberals in Winnipeg to prepare themselves for voting rights.
  • Aug. 9 – Western Liberals endorsed Laurier as their leader after protracted battle on the convention floor.
  • Aug. 11 – International drug ring operating between Winnipeg, St. Paul and Chicago uncovered by police. Ring dealt in opium, cocaine and morphine.
  • Aug. 14 – U.S. agreed to supply all the farmhands required by Manitoba and other provinces for the harvest.
  • Aug. 17 – Futures trading on grain exchange to be banned.
  • Aug. 24 – Contractor Thomas Kelly, sentenced for fraud in building legislative buildings, set free because of his ill-health.
  • Sept. 6 – Government fixed wheat price at $2.20 a bushel maximum.
  • Sept. 8 – Manitoba wheat crop valued at $97,014,000.
  • Sept. 13 – A commission investigated 50-cent-a-ton rise to Winnipeg coal prices, warning if not justified will have to be reduced.
  • Sept. 20 – Draft exception board opened in Winnipeg with start of Canadian conscription.
  • Oct. 3 – Northern Manitoba Indians refused money and charity to aid war effort.
  • Oct. 5 – Businessmen wanted troops to guard Fort William elevators where strike of workers had forced embargo of all grain shipments by train.
  • Oct. 6 – Mrs. Luther Holling announced candidacy in Elmwood ward for city council.
  • Nov. 2 – One thousand city employees sought pay raises of 10 to 15 per cent. Turned down because of war.
  • Nov. 10 – Estimated number of draft dodgers and deserters in Winnipeg was 20,000.
  • Nov. 13 – Police made first raid on pool halls to arrest draft dodgers.
  • Dec. 5 – Controller Charles Gray charged hospitals left patients on stretchers in corridors while officials tried to determine if the patient or his friends could pay the bills.
  • Day. 12 – Osborne Theatre destroyed in $70,000 fire.

c-46

1918

  • Jan. 2 – Brandon got automatic telephone service.
  • Jan. 5 – Three-man commission named by provincial government to investigate Workmen’s Compensation Board.
  • Jan. 10 – Organized labor sought minimum wage of $10 a week.
  • Jan. 31 – Girl killed, five persons injured in street car crash.
  • Feb. 6 – Fallis commission found extravagance in the affairs of the Workmen’s Compensation Board.
  • Feb. 13 – Provincial surplus budget of $7,535,000 presented.
  • Feb. 21 – Winnipeg suggested provincial government adopt income tax system to finance community projects.
  • Mar. 2 – Housewives boycotted bakers when bread prices rose to eight cents a loaf.
  • Mar. 11 – Winnipeg Street Railway Company announced it would introduce “motor buses” to compete with jitneys in areas not served by streetcars.
  • Mar. 14 – City got power to prosecute food hoarders waiting for higher prices. Action followed find of rotten chicken in a cold storage warehouse.
  • Apr. 4 – Manitoba school teachers discussed plans to form a union.
  • Apr. 5 – Anti-loafing law enacted by Parliament.
  • Apr. 15 – Manitoba courts opened to accept divorce cases replacing petitions to Ottawa.
  • May 13 – Winnipeg utilities workers refused to sign no strike agreement. Joined in strike by 400 telephone operators.
  • May 25 – Strikers returned to work on basis of a citizens’ committee settlement proposal.
  • June 29 – Married teachers, other than soldiers’ wives, fired by Winnipeg school board.
  • July 25 – Federal government ordered striking letter carriers back to work or face replacement.
  • July 31 – Striker accept latest government offer that followed threat by labor council to call a general strike.
  • Sept. 18 – Construction of railway to Hudson Bay postponed until after the war. A total of 342 miles completed with 92 left to build.
  • Sept. 21 – Winnipeg voters turned out board of control system of government for the city.
  • Oct. 3 – First records started of Spanish influenza cases in Winnipeg, province.
  • Oct. 12 – Schools, business colleges, billiard parlors, theatres ordered closed in Winnipeg, suburbs. Some rural centres also banned public gatherings.
  • Oct. 23 – Winnipeg General, municipal hospitals overcrowded with ’flu victims.
  • Oct. 29 – Free ’flu inoculations offered.
  • Oct. 31 – All delivery people ordered to wear masks, infected homes to be placarded.
  • Nov. 5 – Manitoba cases of ’flu reported pass 5,000 mark.
  • Nov. 11 – First World War ended. Seven thousand ill with ’flu, more than 400 dead.
  • Nov. 18 – Many Manitoba municipalities considered postponing local elections due to ’flu epidemic.
  • Nov. 21 – Winnipeg milk company announced increase in price of one cent a quart – to 14 cents.
  • Nov. 28 – Schools reopened, theatre, crowd ban removed as officials said worst of epidemic over.
  • Nov. 29 – Charles F. Gray elected mayor of Winnipeg.
  • Dec. 3 – H. Beliveau elected mayor of St. Boniface. – Major W. G. Barker, RAF pilot from Warren, awarded Victoria Cross.
  • Dec. 9 – Archbishop A. A. Sinnott officiated at St. Mary’s, Winnipeg elevated to status of arch-cathedral.
  • Dec. 31 – Winnipeg Board of Control, established Jan. 2, 1907, disbanded. – ’Flu deaths in Winnipeg totalled 899.

c-47

1919

  • Jan. 3 – Provincial agricultural department asked $400,000 increase in estimates to aid farm development.
  • Jan. 11 – Town of Killarney gave notice in Manitoba Gazette of its intention to borrow $12,000 to buy out private power company.
  • Jan. 26 – Winnipeg mob attacks stores, firms with foreign names, wrecked 15 premises, demanded firing of all aliens.
  • Feb. 11 – Government planned $1,000,000 telephone expansion, conversion to dials.
  • Feb. 19 – Manitoba Agricultural Societies passed resolutions opposing margarine, daylight saving.
  • Mar. 7 – Provincial government introduced bill providing for compulsory arbitration in labor disputes, encouragement of collective bargaining and a fair profit to employers.
  • Mar. 27 – Mayor R. D. Waugh turned valve to start flow of water from Shoal Lake to city reservoir. Water in domestic pipes April 5.
  • Apr. 10 – Group of veterans tried to stop Hutterite immigrants at U.S. Border.
  • Apr. 30 – Winnipeg police got pay increase. Street railwaymen threatened strike.
  • May 2 – 1,100 metal workers on strike for pay increase, union recognition.
  • May 15 – General strike started, after unions voted in favor 50 to 1.
  • May 30 – Winnipeg fired 179 policemen for strike action.
  • June 5 – Enrolment of special police increased force to 2,500.
  • June 10 – Mounted police charged crowd at Portage and Main.
  • June 17 – 10 strike leaders jailed, charged with seditious conspiracy.
  • June 21 – Police fired on strikers on Main St., one killed, scores injured. Others arrested.
  • June 25 – General strike called off. Judge H. A. Robson appointed to conduct inquiry of situation.
  • July 3 – Privy Council ruled absolute divorce granted by Manitoba court valid, Initiative and Referendum Act unconstitutional.
  • July 25 – Mrs. S P. Kerr, Lt. W. R. Cross killed and Lt. S. P. Kerr seriously injured in plane crash at Portage la Prairie during Winnipeg-Brandon flight.
  • Aug. 12-13 – Eight strike leaders committed for trial without bail, F. J. Dixon, J. S. Woodsworth freed on bail.
  • Aug. 30 – Gold reported found at Copper Lake, 60 miles north of The Pas.
  • Sept. 5 – Rice Lake gold find reported.
  • Sept. 29 – University of Manitoba, with record enrolment of 1,000, averted threatened student strike for more classroom space, more instructors.
  • Oct. 8 – Winnipeg discussed buying street railway.
  • Oct. 27 – Five Manitoba income tax evaders fined $600 each.
  • Nov. 6 – Manitoba Conservatives urged government to set up provincial department of labor.
  • Nov. 27 – Trial of eight leaders of General Strike started.
  • Dec. 18 – Thousands of school children to be vaccinated in Winnipeg, St. Boniface, Brandon and other centres; authorities feared outbreak of smallpox.
  • Dec. 24 – First strike leader sentenced, R. B. Russell, jailed for two years.

1920

  • Jan. 6 – Farmers at Brandon meeting favored union with labor to defeat old line parties.
  • Jan. 16 – Winnipeg’s three daily newspapers suspended publication as a result of a paper shortage. Publication resumed Jan. 25.
  • Feb. 11 – Board of studies recommended elimination of U.S. textbooks from University of Manitoba.
  • Feb. 13 – Evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson toured amusement areas of Winnipeg to determine why prayer meetings are poorly attended.
  • March 23 – Women given the right to run for public office.
  • March 27 – Six leaders of the 1919 general strike convicted of sedition by a jury which recommended mercy.
  • Apr. 5 – Manitoba divorce law unfair to women said Court of Queen’s Bench jurist.
  • Apr. 26 – Winnipeg Falcons won Olympic ice hockey championship at Antwerp, Belgium.
  • May 1 – A total of 5,000 persons marched through Winnipeg to protest jailing of union leaders convicted of sedition in 1919 strike.
  • May 18 – Legislature to set aside $100,000 to establish vocational schools in Manitoba.
  • June 15 – University of Manitoba reported shortage of 12 professors.
  • June 29 – Norris government won 21 seats to opposition’s 34 in provincial election. Leaders of 1919 strike elected while still in jail.
  • July 7 – Hon. Arthur Meighen, MP for Portage la Prairie, selected as Conservative party leader and prime minister.
  • July 1 – Southam Company took over ownership of Winnipeg Tribune.
  • Aug. 13 – Provincial government adopted policy to force Old Colony Mennonites to place their children in schools. Mennonites say they will move to Quebec.
  • Aug. 23 – Homesteaders in Inwood area threatened by forest fires. Prairie blazes wiped out 17 farmers in Ste. Rose area.
  • Sept. 9 – Provincial government to aid forest and grass fire victims.
  • Sept. 10 – Manitoba government appealed to Ottawa for action on 35 per cent increase in rail freight rates which retailers promised to pass along to consumers.
  • Oct. 8 – Manitoba’s potato crop of 3,700,000 bushels was 1,500,000 below average.
  • Oct. 16 – Winnipeg Telegram ceased publication after 27 years. Subscription lists taken over by The Tribune.
  • Oct. 22 – J. R. Stanley was first passenger by air from Winnipeg to The Pas.
  • Nov. 3 – Liberal leader W. L. McKenzie King in Winnipeg, promised reform in laws to give women greater equality.
  • Nov. 8 – Police redfaced, when prisoner, brought 600 miles to face $300 charge proved to be wrong man.
  • Dec. 1 – Police and customs officials seized 44 cars used for smuggling liquor across the international boundary. Smugglers switched to using airplanes.
  • Dec. 14 – Provincial government granted 1,300 civil servants group insurance.

1921

  • Jan. 1 – Ministerial group and citizens clashed over whether tobogganing on Sunday should be permitted.
  • Jan. 7 – Provincial income tax measure forecast to replace all other forms of levy.
  • Feb. 1 – Alderman urged city purchase of Winnipeg Electric Railway Company.
  • Feb. 24 – Mrs. E. Rogers, MSA, appointed director of new provincial child welfare department.
  • Mar. 5 – Doctors resented being “bartenders” of Manitoba, applied to be relieved of responsibility of handling liquor prescriptions under temperance law.
  • Mar. 23 – Provincial income tax bill debated in legislature. Would give a single person $800 exemption and family $1,800.
  • Apr. 20 – Provincial income tax bill debated in legislature. Would give a single person $800 exemption and family $1,800.
  • May 6 – Provincial income tax bill withdrawn by the government.
  • May 26 – Riel’s brother Joseph on deathbed in East St. Vital.
  • June 3 – J. T. Thorson appointed first dean of University of Manitoba law school.
  • June 18 – Birtle area farmers threatened to tear their telephones out if a proposed rate increase was approved.
  • July 4 – Winnipeg per capita debt at $95.
  • July 16 – Railways to move in up to 40,000 workers to harvest bumper grain crop.
  • Aug. 2 – Province spent $2,000,000 on road development.
  • Aug. 22 – Federal labor minister Gideon Robertson told 600 delegates at Trades and Labor Congress meeting in Winnipeg that wages should be tied to cost of living – meaning pay rates should drop with the recent lower cost of living.
  • Sept. 19 – About 100 Mennonite families prepared to leave Manitoba in dispute over compulsory schooling for their children.
  • Oct. 10 – “Human spider” Bill Strother scaled Union Bank building to raise funds for children’s charities.
  • Oct. 20 – Police commission wanted testing for car drivers.
  • Nov. 1 – Census showed Manitoba had 55,184 farms.
  • Nov. 7 – R. L. Richardson, 62-year old founder of the Tribune, died after lengthy illness.
  • Dec. 3 – Manitoba planned registration of all vehicles in an effort to cut number of thefts by rum runners and others.
  • Dec. 19 – Farmers discussed idea of setting up a co-operative wheat pool to market their crops.

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1922

  • Jan. 4 – Dr. Gerald Grain appointed provincial medical inspector for northern areas.
  • Jan. 25 – Farmer MLAs charged entrance requirements for Agricultural College too high.
  • Feb. 6 – Winnipeg opened its first winter carnival.
  • Feb. 25 – Winnipeg Board of Trade president Travers Sweatman, KC, told meeting that if provincial income tax proposed by Norris government went through “it will undoubtedly have the effect of driving a great deal of business out.”
  • Mar. 9 – Stonecutters’ union agreed to a 20 per cent decrease in pay as living costs went down.
  • Mar. 21 – A boys’ parliament was proposed by Taylor Stratton, national boys’ work secretary of the Trail Rangers.
  • Apr. 13 – Provincial forestry department established radio stations at Norway House, Victoria Beach to aid in anti-fire patrols.
  • Apr. 20 – The Tribune opened its radio station, with nightly broadcasts.
  • May 6 – Assiniboine River floods threatened Brandon, Portage la Prairie and Poplar Point.
  • May 31 – John Sutherland, opposition leader in Manitoba’s first legislature and only survivor of that body, died aged 85.
  • June 3 –In six years of prohibition, authorities noted there had been 9,932 convictions and $545,000 in fines for breaches of liquor act.
  • June 27 – 125,000 acres in Riding Mountain area thrown open for veterans.
  • July 5 – Workers’ Party held record meeting at Narol, starting at 3 p.m., ending 9 p.m.; 190 present and none left during session.
  • July 18 – Provincial election – Norris Liberal government defeated. Farmers party took 29 seats, Liberals 9, Conservatives 6, Labor 5, Independents 5.
  • July 22 – John Bracken, Agricultural College president, agreed to lead Farmers Party, was elected in deferred election in The Pas.
  • Aug. 1 – Five armed men robbed MacGregor bank, got $25.
  • Aug. 29 – Manitoba’s school population was 140,000, an increase of 6,000 over 1921.
  • Sept. 13 – Anglicans meeting in Brandon discussed formation of new bishopric of Brandon.
  • Sept. 23 – Bandits robbed Melita bank of $100,000 cash and bonds, shot Thomas Beveridge, editor of Melita Enterprise in foot.
  • Oct. 9 – Lone bandit got $2,000 from Altona bank.
  • Oct. 25-27 – Manitoba Provincial Police, warned of proposed holdup of Pipestone bank, fumbled the interception, bandits got away. MPP commissioner Col J. C. Rattray, Insp. J. Bain lost their jobs as result.
  • Nov. 13 – Robert Forke, Brandon MB, elected leader of Progressive Party at Winnipeg caucus, succeeding T. A. Crerar.
  • Nov. 25 – Ten students, staff members burned to death; 18 injured when fire destroyed St. Boniface College.
  • Dec. 29 – A. M. (Dad) Scheer, charged with Melita bank robbery and out on $15,000 bail, failed to show up at Brandon assizes for trial.

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Provincial income tax, rum-runners, drugs made money

1923

  • Jan. 18 – Throne speech forecast an inquiry on education.
  • Jan. 24 – Council of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba urges government action to stamp out drug traffic.
  • Jan. 27 – Tax arrears in Winnipeg were $4,645,000.
  • Jan. 31 – Bill introduced in Legislature to increase exemptions from garnishee to $65 a month.
  • Feb. 9 – Sunday trains bill passed committee, contained provision for reference to courts to test legality.
  • Feb. 10 – A bill to regulate financial corporations read in Legislature following several mortgage and trust company failures.
  • Feb. 20 – First provincial income tax introduced in budget along with increased taxes on gas, trading in grain futures, soft drinks, and higher marriage, hunting and automobile licences.
  • Feb. 28 – Premier Bracken outlined unsatisfactory conditions in many rural schools; 170 either closed altogether or open less than half the year.
  • Mar. 8 – Manitoba Telephone System given control of all radio broadcasting in province.
  • Mar. 14 – Narcotics seller was fined $500 with the alternative of nine months in jail.
  • Mar. 15 – Provincial education inquiry ordered to investigate both schools and university.
  • Mar. 16 – Provincial authorities warned that drug sellers could get as much as seven years in jail.
  • Mar. 20 – Federal government approves charter for Manitoba Pulp and Paper Company, which planned a mill at Pine Falls.
  • April 4 – Winnipeg application for charter changes giving greater autonomy were opposed by majority of speakers in the Legislature.
  • April 9 – Province agreed to give financial aid to municipalities in caring for unemployed.
  • April 10 – Boy Scout founder Lord Baden-Powell visited Manitoba.
  • April 16 – Employment offices listed 700 vacancies for farm work.
  • April 19 – Assiniboine River rose 17 feet over normal ice level at Brandon, and railway bridge at Morris was declared unsafe.
  • April 21 – Portage la Prairie and Selkirk hit by Assiniboine, Red River flooding.
  • April 23 – Agitation started in Winnipeg for introduction of Daylight Saving Time.
  • April 27 – Attorney-general R. W. Craig proposed abolition of the Grand Jury in Manitoba.
  • May 4 – Border guards in Manitoba got shoot-to-kill orders to combat rum-runners, bank robbers.
  • May 9 – Three hundred bridges in province demolished or damaged by wide-spread flooding.
  • May 10 – Attorney-general considered using machine-gun equipped aeroplanes to combat border raiders.
  • May 11 – Eastern Canadian interests bought control of Winnipeg based Merchants Casualty (insurance) Co.
  • May 17 – Winnipeg merchants asked that Portage Ave. parking in Winnipeg not be restricted to one hour.
  • May 21 – Winnipeg Electric Co. offered to sell River Park amusement centre to city. Prof. W. G. Smith sued Wesley College for wrongful dismissal.
  • May 2 – Vita was promised new $30,000 hospital.
  • May 23 – Appeal court declared Sunday excursion trains legal.
  • May 24 – Manitoba doctors attended course on use of insulin.
  • May 27 – Fire destroyed five buildings at Beausejour.
  • May 29 – Steamer, dredge locked through St. Andrews dam to open Red River navigation season.
  • June 1 – St. James tax rate was cut 10 per cent to 41.7 mills.
  • June 5 – Manitoba’s last grand jury sworn in.
  • June 7 – Attorney-general gave written approval for operation of Sunday trains to beach resorts.
  • June 10 – 150 English boys, first of 10,000 to be brought to West by Salvation Army, arrived in Winnipeg.
  • June 13 – Dr. Franklin W. Sweet named principal of Brandon College.
  • June 19 – Case against Sunday Concert promoters dismissed when Magistrate Sir Hugh John Macdonald declares Lord’s Day Act ultra vires.
  • June 21 – Ukrainian Catholics planned $150,000 cathedral.
  • June 22 – Province-wide referendum gave majority favoring new temperance act, allowing government to sell liquor.
  • June 30 – House of Commons passes $350,000 fund for work on Hudson Bay Railway.
  • July 3 – Independent labor Party leader F. J. Dixon resigned seat in Legislature.
  • July 9 – Meeting of provincial game officials in Winnipeg proposed uniform game laws across Canada.
  • July 10 – Province agreed to pay two-thirds of cost of gravelling Winnipeg-Emerson Highway, municipalities and others interested to make up the balance.
  • July 11 – Auto thefts increased; insurance rates up 100 per cent in four years.
  • July 16 – World Orange Federation meeting in Winnipeg attracted 500 delegates.
  • July 17 – Former sociology professor W. G. Smith failed in suit against Wesley College for $30,000, claiming wrongful dismissal. Court awarded year’s salary.
  • July 19 – Reeve of Fort Garry told education inquiry there should be one school board for Greater Winnipeg. John Queen named leader of ILP group in Legislature.
  • July 23 – Winnipeg paddlers won 11 out of 12 events at Fort William regatta.
  • July 27 – Royal assent given Legislature bill ending seven years of prohibition in Manitoba.
  • Aug. 1 – Police took largest haul of illegal liquor in province’s history, worth $50,000.
  • Aug. 6 – Ex-Mayor R. D. Waugh to leave post as Allied Commissioner in the Saar Valley, appointed Manitoba Liquor Commission chairman.
  • Aug. 8 – Manitoba farmers decided to take part in interprovincial wheat pool.
  • Aug. 11 – Clive Neilson won aggregate at Manitoba trials for 1924 Olympic Games.
  • Aug. 13 – Province announced $1 liquor permits to be ready by September.
  • Aug. 17 – Many Manitobans caught when Home Bank suspended payments.
  • Aug. 23 – Tribune readers provided day at the beach for 3,000 underprivileged children.
  • Sept. 4 – Police forces demanded mandatory jail sentence for drunken drivers.
  • Sept. 6 – Conservative speaking at Portage la Prairie, charged federal government had betrayed Western Canada.
  • Sept 14 – E. J. McMurray, MP, North Winnipeg named federal solicitor-general.
  • Sept. 25 – Shortage of lake shipping brought slump in wheat price. Lakehead reported holding 100 million bushels.
  • Sept. 27 – “War on Campus” heading: first year girl students at U. of M. rebelled against clothing rules.
  • Sept. 29 – New book “Women of Red River,” by provincial librarian W. J. Healey, reviewed in local papers.
  • Oct. 1 – St. James wanted city status. – Home bank depositors told they might get 40 cents on the dollar.
  • Oct. 3 – Unions proposed free tuition at university.
  • Oct. 4 – Prince of Wales visited Winnipeg.
  • Oct. 6 – Tugboats Archibald and Guest collided near Selkirk, two men killed.
  • Oct. 8 – Real Estate Exchange Board introduced multiple listings in advertising.
  • Oct. 11 – Forestry service flying boat wrecked at The Pas in freak accident, no one injured.
  • Oct. 16 – Winnipeg held big dance to raise funds for development of highway to Emerson.
  • Oct. 17 – Prairie fires at Portage La Prairie and Westbourne destroyed barns, hundreds of tons of hay.
  • Oct. 23 – Manitoba’s birth rate – 30.3 per thousand – highest in Canada.
  • Oct. 26 – John Switzer, 81, once a prisoner of Riel and pioneer of Pine Creek (Gladstone) died in U.S.
  • Oct. 29 – Tribune police reporter returning to office with no news, captured man who had just committed an armed robbery.
  • Nov. 1 – Firemen, Hydro urged all wiring be put underground.
  • Nov. 3 – City’s highway dance drew crowd of 3,000.
  • Nov. 9 – North Dakota cities asked Winnipeg Hydro to sell them power.
  • Nov. 13 – Postal employees who struck in 1919 reinstated.
  • Nov. 17 – Opening game in Western Canada Professional Hockey league in Winnipeg, Calgary Tigers vs Edmonton Eskimos.
  • Nov. 20 – Capt. W. W. Kennedy at Conservative Club meeting, criticized Manitoba Agricultural College for inviting Labor MP J. S. Woodsworth to speak at forum.
  • Nov. 23 – S. J. Farmer elected mayor of Winnipeg for second term.
  • Nov. 30 – Province announced staff reduction and pay cuts to save $500,000.
  • Dec. 1 – Four Lake Winnipegosis fishermen drowned. – Winnipeg militia regiment, 79th Camerons, got permission to add “Queen’s Own” to unit title.
  • Dec. 3 – Provincial cabinet enlarged to eight. Winnipeg Board of Trade set up Bureau.
  • Dec. 7 – Chicago Fair champion bull owned by J. D. McGregor of Brandon, sold to U.S. buyer for $15,000.
  • Dec. 13 – Relief office opened in Winnipeg, Manitoba got craze for Mah Jongg, “a game of oriental mysticism.”
  • Dec. 19 – City police, warned of proposed big bank raid by Chicago gang, placed spiked timbers, roadblocks on all highways out of Winnipeg.
  • Dec. 24 – Missing magistrate, Maj. Heath Jackson, arrested in St. Louis, Mo., charged with theft of provincial government funds. One of earliest private banking firms, Alloway and Champion, taken over by Bank of Commerce.
  • Dec. 25 – Mayor Farmer and colleagues played golf.
  • Dec. 27 – Manitoba doctor jailed on charge of supplying narcotics.
  • Dec. 28 – Magistrates urge government to crack down on drug traffic, order lash for drug sellers.
  • Dec. 31 – Mayor of Winnipeg honored Marjorie Glassco, 15, for saving man from drowning at Pointe du Bois, July 2, presented Royal Human Society medal.

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1924

  • Jan. 4 – Provincial government preparing forms for income tax.
  • Jan. 7 – Legislature got bill to vest all former Presbyterian, Methodist and Congregational church property in United Church of Canada.
  • Jan. 25 – Legislature Speaker P. A. Talbot ruled Presbyterian Church not incorporated and could not legally apply for union with other churches.
  • Jan. 31 – The Manitoba government telephone dept. announced there were 40,000 phones in Winnipeg.
  • Feb. 7 – Douglas Hill, Gilbert Plains farmer appointed to manage Scottish Co-operatives’ 10,000 acres farm in Saskatchewan.
  • Feb. 16 – Government ordered buckthorn bush in Manitoba destroyed on grounds it harbored rust spores.
  • Feb 22 – On-to-the Bay Association formed to campaign for railway to Hudson Bay.
  • Mar. 1 – University of Manitoba started radio lectures, with French as first subject.
  • Mar. 8 – Masked armed thieves stole heroin from Carlton St. drug store at 8:30 a.m.
  • Mar. 13 – Mildred McMurray first woman lawyer to open her own law office in province.
  • Mar. 17 – Anglican Church proposed to build new $100,000 cathedral on site of old St. John’s Cathedral.
  • Apr. 7 – J. H. Ashdown, pioneer merchant, former mayor, died aged 80.
  • Apr. 16 – Crosstown highway using Colony and Balmoral Streets proposed to city council.
  • Apr. 19 – Prices of 12-ounce bottles of whisky sold by druggist retailers reduced by 20 per cent.
  • Apr. 28 – Fort Garry farmer and 12 others arrested for holding cockfights.
  • May 9 – Manitoba Paper Co. announced it would proceed with Pine Falls Paper mill following Ottawa report that railway from East Selkirk to Pine Falls had been approved.
  • May 14 – Canada’s “new” flag, the Red Ensign, ordered flown on all schools May 23.
  • May 24 – Lieutenant-governor Sir James Aikins unveiled statue to Indian chief Peguis in Kildonan Park.
  • June 3 – Retail Merchants Association charged smugglers were bringing in $250,000 worth of goods a month from U.S.
  • June 18 – Winnipeg celebrated 50th anniversary of incorporation with huge parade, speeches, fireworks.
  • June 25 – Probate of J. H. Ashdown will revealed he left $380,000 to charity out of estate of $1,690,000.
  • July 17 – J. T. Haig, Conservative MLA, urged that Canadian Senate should be elected for 10-year term.
  • July 22 – Work started on Ste. Rose – Rorketon railway.
  • Aug. 5 – Miss Amelia Burritt of Winnipeg and Portage la Prairie, who presented petition favoring votes for women when she was over 90, celebrated her 101st birthday.
  • Aug. 15 – Two 15-year old Winnipeg girls, YWCA members, cycled to Winnipeg Beach, 51 miles in six hours.
  • Aug. 21 – St. Vital planned to auction last fire horse, Jeff, 11 years in Service.
  • Aug. 26 – Government liquor commission banned sale of draft beer, allowing only pint and quart bottles.
  • Oct. 7 – St. Mary’s Academy celebrated 50th anniversary.
  • Oct. 9 – Winnipeg central heating plant opened.
  • Oct. 15 – A cache of $2,000 worth of gold coins, nuggets found by children playing on bank of Red River.
  • Oct. 27 – Ottawa officials charged coal dealers in Winnipeg had increased prices costing consumers $300,000 annually.
  • Nov. 28 – R. H. Webb elected mayor of Winnipeg.
  • Dec. 5 – Demolition started on building which housed Winnipeg’s first bank, in 1871.
  • Dec. 8 – Harry Hyde, fur trader of Meadow Lea, who came west with Wolseley Expedition, died at 88. – Professional and Business Women’s Club formed in Winnipeg, Mildred McMurray, first president.
  • Dec. 22 – Privy Council ruled that Sunday trains are legal.

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1925

  • Jan. 23 – Wheat price reached $2.02 a bushel.
  • Jan. 26 – Wheat, at $2.06, highest since 1920.
  • Jan. 31 – Worst blizzard in 20 years paralyzed cities, towns, rural roads.
  • Feb. 21 – Province planned to build 1,500 miles of trunk highways.
  • Mar. 10 – Five persons were arrested on charges of illegal practices in connection with sale of coal to Fort Osborne Barracks.
  • Mar. 17 – Wheat price dropped back to $1.52½.
  • Mar. 22 – Charges laid against Christian Science practitioners for illegal practice of medicine.
  • Apr. 6 – Charges were laid against promoters of Ringo Mines.
  • Apr. 9 – Province took over control of horse-racing.
  • April 14 – Royal Canadian Air Force planes started patrols of northern part of province.
  • April 24 – Sir Augustus Nanton, Winnipeg financier, died.
  • April 30 – Vandals stole the beavers from Assiniboine Park Zoo.
  • May 14 – Winnipeg Electric Co. set a price of $18,000,000 for its street railway properties.
  • May 15 – The Tribune organized goodwill motor tour to St. Paul.
  • May 26 – Wheat bounced back up to $2.00.
  • June 8 – Christian Science practitioner won an appeal against jail sentence imposed by lower court.
  • June 12 – Polo Park race track opened.
  • July 6 – Fort Alexander was chosen as site for new pulp and paper mill.
  • July 11 – Hudson’s Bay Company announced it would build a new retail store at the corner of Portage Ave. and Memorial Boulevard.
  • Aug. 19 – Man sentenced to seven days in jail for driving while intoxicated.
  • Sept 3 – First sod was turned for new HBC store.
  • Sept 5 – Wheat Pool sets initial payment to farmers at $1.62.
  • Oct. 19 – Five boys escaped from the provincial industrial school at Portage la Prairie.
  • Nov. 25 – Joseph X. Hearst charged in connection with failure of his music publishing company.
  • Dec. 21 – First coating of gravel completed on Winnipeg-Emerson highway.

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1926

  • Jan. 4 – Vandals raided city schools; youngsters blamed.
  • Jan. 9 – Golfers played on city courses.
  • Jan. 24 – Pine-to-Palm motorcade from Winnipeg to New Orleans.
  • Jan. 26 – Workmen found mysterious tunnel under Portage Ave.
  • Jan. 30 – Province licensed only two race tracks, Polo Park and Whittier Park, in St. Boniface.
  • Feb. 13 – Waverley Block destroyed by fire in Winnipeg, the third big fire of the year.
  • Feb. 17 – St. Boniface announced land had been purchased for a large pulp and paper mill in that city.
  • Mar. 3 – Magistrate R. B. Graham declared that more use should be made of the lash in punishing criminals.
  • Mar. 6 – A London, England group was announced as having purchased an unidentified Manitoba mine for $250,000.
  • Mar. 8 – Pearl Spencer won The Manitoba Dog Derby at The Pas for the second year.
  • Mar. 10 – Wheat pools distributed $37,000,000 in payments to members.
  • May 7 – A 700 per cent increase of tourism in 1925 was announced.
  • May 10 – James Bruce, one of the last links with the Red River rebellion, died.
  • May 26 – United Church ministers asked that Sunday golf be banned.
  • June 9 – Cornerstone was laid for new St. John’s cathedral.
  • June 29 – J. X. Hearst sentenced to seven years in prison.
  • July 6 – Weeklies operating football and baseball contests were targets of police action.
  • July 15 – C. J. Brown, veteran Winnipeg city clerk, died.
  • Sept. 14 – Federal election.
  • Oct. 3 – Speed limit of 20 miles per hour imposed for Portage Ave. and Main Street.
  • Oct. 9 – T. A. Burrows sworn in as lieutenant-government of Manitoba.
  • Oct. 15 – Building permits passed $10,000,000 mark.
  • Nov. 5 – Natural gas well discovered at Souris.
  • Nov. 18 – New HBC store in Winnipeg opened. – Famed Winnipeg character Ginger Snooks died.
  • Nov. 24 – Magistrate declared city speed limited illegal.
  • Dec. 23 – Four firemen died in Winnipeg Theatre fire.

1927

  • Jan. 10 – J. D. McArthur, vice-president Manitoba Paper Co., early railway builder, died at 74.
  • Jan. 24 – Lew Pearce, comedian, calmed crowd with jokes when smoke filled Dominion Theatre, Winnipeg.
  • Jan. 28 – Emil St. Godard won The Pas dog derby.
  • Feb. 15 – Premier Bracken’s budget forecast income tax cut of 20 per cent; three days later, federal tax also cut.
  • Feb. 23 – Emil St. Godard won international dog derby in Quebec.
  • Mar. 2 – Western Canada Airways flew survey supplies to Churchill.
  • Mar. 9-10 – Several men arrested for forgery in petition for new beer law.
  • Mar. 25 – Lights placed on Icelandic River to aid navigation.
  • Apr. 1 – Triplets born to Mrs. and Mrs. W. Burch, St. James, received three-passenger carriage from municipal council.
  • Apr. 14 – Eatons remodelled ground-floor facing with Tyndall Stone.
  • Apr. 21-30 – R. A. Hoey sworn in as provincial minister of education, W. J. Major as attorney-general.
  • May 10 – Manitoba’s population 639,000 (610,000 in 1921).
  • May 11 – Mrs. Elizabeth Alloway’s will provided $800,000 for Winnipeg Foundation.
  • May 21 – Hon. W. A. Johnson, former attorney-general and minister of public works in Norris government, died at 58.
  • June 8 – Winnipeg’s Mayor Webb attacked Ottawa policy of “filling up the West with non-Britons.”
  • June 9-10 – Conservative leader F. G. Taylor, Liberal leader H. A. Robson urged public ownership of White Mud Falls on Nelson River.
  • June 11-12 – Two Winnipeg women, Mrs. W. Patterson, Lola Cowan strangled to death. Police searching for U.S. Criminal.
  • June 16 – Earle Nelson, known as The Strangler, arrested at Killarney, escaped, re-arrested and brought to city.
  • June 28 – Provincial election, Bracken government returned with 29 seats, Conservatives 15, Liberals 7, Labor 3. – Sale of beer by glass approved in referendum by vote of 70,000 to 62,000.
  • Aug. 9 – Prince of Wales, Prince George, Stanley Baldin visited Winnipeg briefly.
  • Aug. 10 – Frederick Palmer, British expert recommended Churchill as terminus of H. B. Railway.
  • Aug. 13 – Hon. Ca. A. Dunning, minister of railways announced work on the Bay railway would be started immediately,
  • Sept. 15 – Bilingual Magistrate Henri Lacerte understood man who spoke only French, fined him $5 for mistreating animals.
  • Sept. 19 – Grand, Victoria Beach holidayers marooned by washout on railway. – First snow fell.
  • Oct. 6 – University of Manitoba, celebrated 50th anniversary.
  • Oct. 13 – R.B. Bennett chosen national Conservative leader at convention in Winnipeg
  • Oct. 31 – St. James, West Kildonan, Transcona and St. Vital released from control by suburban board.
  • Nov. 15 – Dauphin game warden swamped with big game licence applications, had to wire for more forms.
  • Dec. 2 – Provincial police dog, Ben, who took part in famous chases, including that for Earle Nelson, died.
  • Dec. 3 – Four fishermen missed on Lake Winnipeg rescued after being adrift for 20 hours.
  • Dec. 14 – First gold brick produced by Central Manitoba Mines.

c-55

Strangler Nelson hanged in Winnipeg

1928

JANUARY

  • Jan. 2 – Holdup man got $1,000 to Lyceum Theatre robbery.
  • Jan. 5 – War ace Capt. Fredrick J. Stevenson killed in aeroplane crash at The Pas.
  • Jan. 13 – Earl Nelson, The Strangler, hanged for murder of Winnipeg girl.
  • Jan. 16 – Manitoba Telephone System proposed $1,000,000 expansion plan.
  • Jan. 17 – Winnipeg’s population rose by 10,000 in 1927, it was officially reported.
  • Jan. 23 – Winnipeg Grain Exchange announced $500,000 addition to its building.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 3 – Province announced deficit of $600,000.
  • Feb. 4 – Sheriff Colin Inkster retired after serving 52 years.
  • Feb. 17 – Manitoba Provincial Police got additional 20 men.
  • Feb. 21 – Old Age pension bill introduced in Legislature.
  • Feb. 25 – Winnipeg granted civic employees right to organize.

MARCH

  • March 1 – Western Canada wheat pool members got $28,000,000 in payments for 1927 crop.
  • Mar. 14 – Sale of beer by the glass, in beer parlors, started.
  • Mar. 15 – Winnipeg Hydro’s 1927 earnings were $197,000.
  • Mar. 20 – Hogg report, advocating private development of Seven Sisters Falls, presented to government.

APRIL

  • April 7 – Admiral Richard Byrd’s plane arrived in Winnipeg after cold-weather tests at the Pas, preparatory to his flight to the South Pole.
  • April 14 – Five killed in Casa Loma Apartments fire.
  • April 21 – Two thousand jobless men rally at City Hall.
  • April 22 – C. W. Sherritt, W. Johnson killed in aeroplane crash at The Pas.
  • April 25 – Winnipeg girl, Julia Johnson, 7, missing.

MAY

  • May 1 – CPR planned $575,000 expansion of Weston shops.
  • May 3 – The Tribune offered $500 reward for information on Julia Johnson.
  • May 8 – Twelve killed in traffic accidents in first three months of year.
  • May 19 – Canadian Industries Limited announced plans for $1,000,000 powder plant.
  • May 22 – Constable saved four-year-old boy from river.

JUNE

  • June 16 – W. B. Lawson, Oakville, Man., killed in aeroplane cash in Charleswood.
  • June 28 – Strike of carpenters delayed construction program in Winnipeg.

JULY

  • July 2 – Heat, mosquitoes plagued province over holiday weekend.
  • July 30 – Five gunmen robbed provincial bank messenger of $25,000.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 15 – North Star Oil plant heavily damaged by fire.
  • Aug. 20 – Prince George, Duke of York, visited Manitoba.
  • Aug. 22 – Severe lightning storms started many fires in province.
  • Aug. 30 – Outbreak of infantile paralysis (polio) forced school authorities to delay school re-opening until October 1.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 13 – Western Canada Airways started air express.
  • Sept. 26 – Manitoba wheat crop estimated at 55,000,000 bu.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 11 – Wheat Pools paid out final $5,000,000 on 1927 crop.
  • Oct. 15 – Board of Trade planned five-year development program for city.
  • Oct. 25 – City officials, business men planned movement to keep University of Manitoba in city, instead of proposed transfer to Fort Garry.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 3 – Manitoba’s population increased 50,000 in first six months of year.
  • Nov. 23 – Six Lake Manitoba fishermen rescued after storm.
  • Nov. 24 – Bylaw to permit City Hydro to develop Slave Fall site approved by citizens – 13,086 in favor, 484 against.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 10 – Prairie air mail trial flights started, linking Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Edmonton and Calgary.
  • Dec. 13 – Provincial police, RCMP staged big cleanup at The Pas. Bootleggers, gambling joints closed.
  • Dec. 15 – Mrs. A. Blanc, proprietor of St. Charles general store routed holdup men with a horsewhip.
  • Dec. 19 – Fisherman rescued six colleagues from ice floe in Lake Manitoba. – Daniel McIntyre retired as superintendent of Winnipeg schools.
  • Dec. 24 – One-cent postage to all parts of British Empire announced by Ottawa.
  • Dec. 28 – Province prepared for 80,000 car license applications in 1929.

c- 57

Power was prime topic

1929

  • Jan. 18 – Province bought site for jail at Headingley.
  • Jan. 19 – Lieutenant-governor T. A. Burrows died, aged 72.
  • Jan. 21 – St. Boniface police chief T. Gagnon suspended.
  • Jan. 24 – Trades and Labor Council asked for compulsory public liability insurance for motor vehicles.
  • Jan. 26 – J. D. McGregor, Brandon stock breeder, appointed as new lieutenant-governor.
  • Feb. 9 – North wing of Portage la Prairie General hospital burned.
  • Feb. 11 – Greater Winnipeg population rose 31,308 in year to 336,202, according to city directory count.
  • Feb. 23 – Hon. W. J. Major, attorney-general, Hon. W. R. Clubb, minister of public works, resigned from provincial cabinet due to ownership of Winnipeg Electric Co. stocks during negotiations between government company.
  • Feb. 27 – Manitoba Telephone System planned $1,159,000 program, including service to The Pas, Flin Flon.
  • Feb. 28 – Sir James Aikins, former lieutenant-governor, died.
  • Mar. 6 – Provincial public safety commissioner urged tests for all applicants for drivers’ licenses.
  • Mar. 14 – Telegraph line completed to Churchill.
  • Mar. 18 – County Court Judge L. St. G. Stubbs gave controversial ruling in Macdonald will case which led to his dismissal.
  • Mar. 20 – Liberals accepted offer to join Bracken government.
  • Mar. 29 – Sir Hugh John Macdonald, former premier, died. – Railway line, started in 1911, reached Churchill.
  • Apr. 1 – Stock slump in New York affected Winnipeg markets.
  • Apr. 15 – J. S. Wood, United Farmers of Manitoba leader, died.
  • Apr. 17 – Sir Clifford Sifton died in New York at 68.
  • Apr. 19 – Prominent Conservative John T. Haig proposed abolition of lieutenant-governor’s office for economy, saying “It leads to nothing but snobbery.”
  • May 1 – Report on Seven Sisters Falls deal exonerated Bracken government.
  • May 11 – Government House staff reported $100 worth of silver stolen over period of time.
  • May 20 – Clubb, Major returned to cabinet posts.
  • May 22 – Another stock slump reported.
  • May 29 – Five boys escaped from Portage la Prairie institution.
  • June 5-6 – 200 homeless at Cranberry Portage, 300 at Mile 83, when forest fires destroy buildings.
  • June 7 – United Church sets up new presbytery to care for north from The Pas to Churchill.
  • June 22 – Western Canada Airways got contract to fly route to Calgary, Edmonton via Regina, Saskatoon.
  • July 1 – Baldur voters approved contract with provincial Hydro. Carberry, Austin, MacGregor and Sidney awaited Brandon decision on matter.
  • July 8 – Dr. H. M. Speechly appointed provincial coroner.
  • July 11 – Nine companies joined to set up Federal Grains Ltd.
  • July 13 – Mrs. T. Ballingal, Dominion City, took first airplane flight two days before her 102nd birthday.
  • July 23 – Canadian-American Airlines Ltd. Started daily service between Winnipeg, Minneapolis with stops at Fargo, Grand Forks.
  • July 24 – Manitoba’s population 663,000 (1928 – 655,000; 1921 – 610,000) according to federal census.
  • Aug. 1 – Fires east of Lake Winnipeg endangered Berens River.
  • Aug. 9 – More serious declines in stock market reported.
  • Aug. 12 – Two St. James firemen killed, two injured when fire truck rolled on Portage Ave.
  • Aug. 17-21 – Poplar River, Berens River, Flin Flon faced fire threats.
  • Sept 2 – Nine killed, 8 injured in Medway block fire in Winnipeg.
  • Sept 4 – Melita voted 138-12 in favor of provincial Hydro contract.
  • Sept. 12 – C. F. Mews, pilot lost 18 days in north, rescued.
  • Sept. 13-18 – Exchequer Court held hearings in Winnipeg on government action to expropriate Beech family land at Churchill.
  • Sept. 28 – Brandon voters approved Hydro contract 2,386 to 921.
  • Oct. 7 – Lady Schultz, widow of former lieutenant-governor, Sir John Schultz, died.
  • Oct. 18 – Privy Council, London, ruled that Canadian women were “persons” and could sit in Senate. Mrs. Edith Rogers, MLA, proposed as senator.
  • Oct. 24-28 – Stock market crash in New York.
  • Nov. 18 – Western Gypsum Co. announced plan to build plant in Winnipeg.
  • Nov. 21 – U. of M. students held “overflow” class at Portage and Main protesting lack of classrooms.
  • Nov. 26 – Mr. Justice E. K. Dysart established first Court of King’s Bench at The Pas.
  • Nov. 29 – Government selected Manitoba Agricultural College as site for University, students protested distance.
  • Dec. 4 – Premier Bracken promised to cut provincial tax on property by 50 per cent.

c-59

River flooded, but drought seared grain fields

1930

JANUARY

  • Jan. 1 – Trade and Commerce Minister James Malcolm said new production records had been set in 1929.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 13 – Judge L. St. G. Stubbs addressed mass meeting to explain his side of battle with province.
  • Feb. 20 – Winnipeg Flying Club planned new club-house, ordered two new planes.
  • Feb. 22 – Premier Bracken opposed to national grain board.
  • Feb. 24 – Forward pass was outlawed by the Canadian Rugby Union.
  • Feb. 26 – Manitoba school trustees were told that the rural school system was too unwieldy.
  • Feb. 27 – Report shows 1929 liquor law infractions in province produced $167,440 in fines. Jail terms given to 125 persons (30 in 1928).

MARCH

  • Mar. 1 – Legislative committee urged increase of $10 a month for widows of industrial accident victims.
  • Mar. 3 – Western Canada air mail service officially started with 150,000 letters in first flight.
  • Mar. 5 – Conservative MLA Sanford Evans left party over its support of provincial guarantees to wheat pools.
  • Mar. 11 – Fire destroyed the hotel at Plumas.
  • Mar. 13 – Provincial Hydro reported service to 25,900 customers, a 1929 surplus of $125,000.
  • Mar. 17 – Jack Cornell, Binscarth, won grand championship for wheat at Brandon Winter Fair.
  • Mar. 22 – Blizzard brought four inches of snow to southern part of province.
  • Mar. 25 – Legislature agreed to include fair wage clause in provincial road contracts.

APRIL

  • April 8 – Floods threatened many towns in Assiniboine and Red River valleys.
  • April 12 – Town of Makinak practically wiped out by fire.
  • April 26 – Archbishop Matheson of Rupert’s Land announced he would retire in September.

MAY

  • May 8 – Two fishermen missing on Lake Winnipeg.
  • May 14 – Aircraft called into search for missing men on lake.
  • May 15 – Contract for Churchill grain elevators let.
  • May 20 – Dauphin rescinded previous agreement to support private development of Meadow Portage power site.
  • May 24 – Ex-soldier settlers relief plan approved. Debts to be cut by 30 per cent.
  • May 27 – Parallel parking in downtown area approved by Winnipeg city council.
  • May 31 – Province declared public holiday July 15 to mark Manitoba’s 60th anniversary.

JUNE

  • June 2 – Damage heavy in Transcona, Selkirk fires.
  • June 3 – Manitoba’s industrial output in 1929 set at $165,000,000 up $63,000,000 over 1924.
  • June 9 – R. B. Bennett, Conservative leader, opened his federal election campaign in Winnipeg.
  • June 10 – Women’s Institutes held their 20th annual conference with 150 delegates attending.
  • June 12 – Albert Waddington, 16, won provincial plowing competition at Portage la Prairie.
  • June 14 – Flin Flon got first power from Island Lake development.
  • June 18 – Canker worms were stripping trees in many areas of province.
  • June 20 – Three Portage la Prairie boys saved a three-year-old from a well.
  • June 23 – Hail did severe damage to southern Manitoba crops.
  • June 25 – Unemployed tried to get into city hall after Market Square meeting. Police used batons, arrested jobless leader James Bettie, who was subsequently given a year in jail.
  • June 28 – New developments would make possible delivery of Nelson River power to Winnipeg, said engineer.

JULY

  • July 1 – Hydro officials forecast a power shortage if dry weather continued.
  • July 8 – Crops in Brandon region flattened by hail.
  • July 15 – Jubilee of Manitoba’s entry into Confederation marked by province-wide ceremonies; federal government handed over control of natural resources to province.
  • July 21 – A Miss Leggat of Birtle, reported seeing a rainbow at night.
  • July 22 – Radio-telephone linked Winnipeg – The Pas.
  • July 23 – Canal to drain water from Rosser area to Red River at Middlechurch proposed.
  • July 24 – Heavy attack on wheat by stem rust reported.
  • July 28 – Federal election; Manitoba constituencies elected 11 Conservatives, one Liberal, three Liberal-Progressives, two Labor.
  • July 30 – Old-time prospectors shook heads at sight of four-hole golf course in old lake-bed at Flin Flon.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 5 – West experiencing heat wave. Thousands attended first Highlands Games at Brandon.
  • Aug. 8 – Harold and George Cairns, father and son, found after surviving 21 days in bush on diet of berries.
  • Aug. 13 – Dissatisfied wheat pool members at Carman lose out in court attempt to break contract with pool.
  • Aug. 14 – Mayor Harry Cater of Brandon asked province for public works to aid unemployed.
  • Aug. 15 – Chatauqua tent shows made circuit of Manitoba towns. Season ticket $2.00 for six days.
  • Aug. 18 – A forestry patrol flying boat rushed a man to city for appendix operation.
  • Aug. 20 – Miniature golf fad at its height.
  • Aug. 22 – Canadian Medical Association held annual conference in Winnipeg.
  • Aug. 26 – Premier Bracken urged creditors not use undue pressure on farmers in debt.
  • Aug. 28 – Alhambra Hotel in Gladstone burned, 30 guests escape flames.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 1 – Riverton Manufacturing Co. sawmill and lumber yard destroyed by fire.
  • Sept. 6 – Provincial, municipal representatives prepared long list of public works for unemployment relief.
  • Sept. 15 – Manitoba Law School offered course in aviation law.
  • Sept. 19 – Two teenage gangs blamed for rash of house break-ins, rounded up.
  • Sept. 22 – Premier Bracken proposed farm debt adjustment bureau in speech to credit firms.
  • Sept. 24 – Wheat pools face increasing desertions by dissatisfied members.
  • Sept. 25 – Great increase in numbers of youthful prisoners called an indictment of parents, by penitentiary general superintendent.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 1 – CPR president E. W. Beatty told Winnipeg meeting better times are ahead.
  • Oct. 2 – Winnipeg mayor Ralph Webb ruled that no transients will be given relief work in city.
  • Oct. 4 – Long-distance phone service to Flin Flon in operation.
  • Oct. 11 – St. James asked $200,000 for Portage Ave. relief paving project.
  • Oct. 13 – Province banned liquor advertising.
  • Oct. 14 – Business district of Minto damaged by fire.
  • Oct. 15 – Valley River farmers asked federal government for action to cut farm machinery cost.
  • Oct. 16 – Masked trio rob Winnipeg bank of $12,000.
  • Oct. 21 – During first 10 months of year, Greater Winnipeg fatalities due to automobiles numbered 25, and 20 suicides listed.
  • Oct. 22 – Two men drowned when tug blew up near Gimli.
  • Oct. 25 – Lake Winnipeg lighthouse-keeper and assistant missing during bad storm.
  • Oct. 28 – Premier Bracken admitted province may lose $2,000,000 as result of wheat pool guarantees.
  • Oct. 29 – Harry Cater won 14th term and mayor of Brandon.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 3 – Manitoba Wheat Pool delegates voted in favor of compulsory wheat pool.
  • Nov. 10 – Birtle, St. Lazare told provincial hydro will complete power lines to serve both towns before the end of the year.
  • Nov. 13 – Prof. Watson Kirkconnell warned that growth of two opposing camps in Europe is threat to peace.
  • Nov. 17 – Telephone, power lines around Winnipeg brought down by sudden six-inch fall of snow.
  • Nov. 19 – Premier Bracken was in Ottawa seeking federal support on wheat pool losses while UFM in convention at Portage la Prairie voted against a federal wheat price fixing law.
  • Nov. 21 – Eight inches of snow tied up city traffic.
  • Nov. 25 – Two Lundar fishermen drowned in Lake Manitoba.
  • Nov. 29 – R. H. Webb elected to fifth term as mayor of Winnipeg.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 1 – Jerry Robinson, 50 years in retail business in Winnipeg, died at age of 88.
  • Dec. 9 – Dense fog slowed trains, traffic all day.
  • Dec. 13 – Wheat hit all-time low of 54 cents on Grain Exchange.
  • Dec. 21 – Manitoba honey production for year valued at $900,000.
  • Dec. 24 – 150 pupils, staff escape when Hartney school catches fire.
  • Dec. 27 – Sir Hubert Wilkins forecast use of submarine ships to carry wheat from Churchill to Europe.
  • Dec. 29 – Police reports showed 35 armed holdups took place in last three months of year.

c-60

Jaywalk bylaw passed by city

1931

  • Jan. 7 – Tourist travel to Manitoba increased 13 per cent in 1930 over 1929, with 12,000 more cars entering the province.
  • Jan. 26 – The Avenue Block, on Portage Ave., was destroyed by fire.
  • Feb. 4 – Provincial income tax brought in a record sum of $840,000.
  • Feb. 17 – Winnipeg passed anti-jay-walking by-law.
  • Feb. 19 – City decided to try red and green traffic lights at 20 intersections.
  • Mar. 4 – Earl Brydges won the Dog Derby at The Pas for the second year in succession.
  • Mar. 5 – Fire at Winnipeg airport destroyed hangar, 8 planes.
  • Mar. 10 – J. R. Murray charged wheat pools not dealing fairly with farmers.
  • Mar. 25 – Province sets up commission to inquire into charges against wheat pools.
  • Mar. 26 – Inquiry opened into operations of Manitoba Farm Loans Board.
  • Mar. 27 – Elmwood Millionaires won the junior Dominion hockey title.
  • April 1 – Brooklands School closed for a month due to lack of funds.
  • April 3 – Winnipeg brought the Allen Cup to the City for the eighth time. – City council voted to discontinue the registration of unemployed.
  • April 15 – Rev. I. O. Stringer elected Archbishop of Rupert’s land.
  • May 7 – First group of jaywalkers appear in Winnipeg traffic court under February bylaw.
  • May 8 – Bank manager killed during holdup of branch of Bank of Montreal.
  • May 16 – Bush fires threaten whole of Riding Mountain National Park.
  • May 19 – Blizzard swept southern Manitoba. On May 15, the temperature had been 90 above.
  • May 29 – Debt Adjustment Board to handle farm debts was appointed.
  • June 9 – Winnipeg approved appointment of town planning commission.
  • June 19 – Worst dust storm ever experienced swept south of province, hit Winnipeg.
  • June 26 – Mr. Murdock McKay named provincial Liberal leader.
  • July 1 – A 10-day goodwill air tour set out to visit number of Manitoba centres.
  • July 11 – Fleet of aircraft visited city in Trans-Canada Air Pageant.
  • July 17 – Western Labor Conference opened in Winnipeg.
  • July 22 – The Tribune’s Community Singing series opened, drew thousands to Assiniboine park.
  • July 27 – Walker Theatre Walkathon closed after contestants had walked 800 hours.
  • Aug. 1 – Mrs. Margaret Scott, founder of the nursing mission bearing her name, died.
  • Aug. 3 – Big air exhibition held at Stevenson Field.
  • Aug. 10 – Wheat pools of three prairie provinces vote to carry on wheat marketing separately.
  • Aug. 14 – 1931 census showed Winnipeg population to be 217,000, Greater Winnipeg 288,000.
  • Aug. 17 – Pedestrian traffic control was abolished. Right turns for traffic on red light was approved.
  • Aug. 18 – Manitoba College was sold.
  • Aug. 27 – Ottawa agrees to formula for sharing relief costs.
  • September 1 – Archbishop Stringer installed at St. John’s Cathedral. – City Hydro’s Slave Falls plant opened.
  • Sept. 7 – Labor Day, temperature was at 96.
  • Sept. 8 – Excavation started on new U. of M. Science building at Fort Garry site.
  • Sept. 18 – First grain shipment left port of Churchill.
  • Sept. 30 – New St. Boniface Sanatorium opened.
  • Oct. 6 – Bracken invites opposition parties to join in coalition. Conservative leader F. G. Taylor rejected idea.
  • Oct. 9 – Salter St. Viaduct work started.
  • Oct. 13 – Thanksgiving first celebrated on new date set by Ottawa.
  • Oct. 16 – U. of M. registrations largest on record.
  • Oct. 20 – Manitoba Power Commission appointed.
  • Nov. 17 – Canadian Pacific reopened its Weston shops
  • Nov. 21 – New Norwood and Main St. bridges opened.
  • Nov. 23 – First sod was turned for civic auditorium built as relief project.
  • Nov. 24 – Manitoba’s population 698,000.
  • Dec. 13 – Official figures show 11,000 on relief in Winnipeg.
  • Dec. 25 – Tribune Empty Stocking Fund set a new record for donations.
  • Dec. 30 – Agreement reached on taxi fares.

c-60

First Grain shipped from Manitoba’s seaport

1932

  • Jan. 9 – Western Canadian Airways opened new main hanger.
  • Jan. 12 – Prime Minister W. L. M. King opened federal election campaign in Fort Garry Hotel.
  • Jan. 17 – $30,000 fire destroyed Allandale Dairy.
  • Jan. 26 – Winnipeg Hockey team left for Lake Placid Olympic Games.
  • Feb. 10 – General opinion in Manitoba favorable to Ottawa announcement radio broadcasting to be under federal control.
  • Feb. 13 – Winnipeg win hockey title at Olympic Games.
  • Feb. 19 – Provincial bank closed.
  • Feb. 24 – Pine Falls mill closed temporarily. – Contract let for auditorium project in Winnipeg.
  • Mar. 1 – Stratford-on-Avon Players visited Winnipeg for third season.
  • Mar. 7 – Legislature passed Seed Grain and Fodder Act to assist farmers.
  • Mar. 8 – Manitoba $2,000,000 Bond issue oversubscribed.
  • Mar. 28 – Monarchs won western junior hockey title.
  • April 4 – Sudbury defeated Monarchs for national junior hockey title.
  • April 10 – Knox Church, Winnipeg, celebrated its 60th anniversary.
  • April 15 – One convict killed, many injured in riot at Stony Mountain penitentiary.
  • May 1 – May Day parade passed off peacefully.
  • May 6 – Three Communists arrested as government attempted to curb activities of the radical party.
  • May 11 – Judge L. St. G. Stubbs resigned position on Surrogate Court in protest against government decision to investigate his activities.
  • May 19 – Provincial Liberal convention held.
  • May 23 – First naturalization ceremony in Manitoba held.
  • May 26 – Formation of Liberal-Progressive Party in Manitoba announced Liberals got seats in cabinet.
  • June 6 – 144 candidates nominated for provincial election.
  • June 11 – Manitoba Horse Show opened at Whittier Park.
  • June 13 – Shortages revealed in Provincial Savings Bank.
  • June 16 – Provincial Election, government won 38 seats, opposition 17.
  • July 3 – Lord Rothermere, British press party visited city.
  • July 9 – Winnipeg announced 25,000 individuals on relief.
  • July 12 – First tribune community singing for season, held in Assiniboine Park.
  • Aug. 3 – City’s land assessment cut $14,000,000 by board of assessment.
  • Aug. 15 – First grain ship clears port of Churchill bound for U.K.
  • Aug. 16 – University graduate who robbed Winnipeg bank sentenced to 10 years, 10 lashes.
  • Aug. 18 – 60,000 people attended final community sing.
  • Aug. 25 – J. A. Machray, chairman, Board of Governors, University of Manitoba, and also U. bursar and chancellor of the Anglican diocese of Rupert’s Land, charged with embezzlement of nearly $2,000,000.
  • Sept. 8 – Machray appeared in court for first hearing. Mrs. Frances Glover first woman licensed as taxi driver.
  • Sept. 9 – Dr. Ross Mitchell of Winnipeg, proposes system of health insurance.
  • Sept. 14 – Sidney T. Smith elected president of Winnipeg Grain Exchange.
  • Sept. 21 – Manitoba bond issue of $4,000,000 over-subscribed.
  • Sept. 22 – Machray sentenced to seven years in prison.
  • Sept. 23 – Royal Commission to investigate university defalcations appointed with Chief Justice W. F. A. Turgeon as chairman.
  • Oct. 3 – Premier Bracken claimed he had no knowledge of Machray defalcations before provincial election.
  • Oct. 4 – City Hydro deficit announced.
  • Oct. 6 – St. Boniface fire chief sentenced to 18 months for theft of $6,000.
  • Oct. 14 – Survivors of ship Bright Fan, which sank earlier while en route to Churchill, arrived in Winnipeg.
  • Oct. 15 – New civic auditorium opened.
  • Oct. 19 – Jules Prud’homme named chancellor of Rupert’s Land.
  • Oct. 26 – Salter St. viaduct opened in Winnipeg.
  • Oct. 28 – Sir Harry Lauder in Winnipeg for performance.
  • Nov. 2 – The UFM held its annual convention in Dauphin.
  • Nov. 10 – First blizzard of the year hit Manitoba.
  • Nov. 18 – Frank R. Dowse elected mayor of St. Boniface.
  • Nov. 25 – Ralph H. Webb again re-elected mayor of Winnipeg.
  • Nov. 29 – Anti-tax sale demonstration at Arborg.
  • Dec. 1 – Royal Commission started inquiry into University of Manitoba trust funds. – Winnipeg to keep schools open during December despite lack of funds.
  • Dec. 2 – Fort Garry Kennel Club asked free dog licences for the unemployed.
  • Dec. 6 – Oakburn post office robbed. Winnipeg aldermen vote to cut their own pay.
  • Dec. 7 – Inquiry ordered into Judge L. St. G. Stubb’s conduct on bench, Mr. Justice Frank Ford to preside.
  • Dec. 11 – Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra played its inaugural concert in the new auditorium.
  • Dec. 13 – Archbishop A. A. Sinnott announced lack of funds would force closing of eight Roman Catholic schools in Winnipeg.
  • Dec. 14 – Museum opened in Winnipeg auditorium.
  • Dec. 19 – Provincial premiers met to plan uniform debt adjustment laws for protection of farms and urban homes.
  • Dec. 21 – Humane Society had Christmas treat for animals in its shelter – a Christmas tree decked with wieners.

c-60

New party explained

1933

  • Jan. 18 – Public meeting held at Walker theatre to hear explanation of new CCF party.
  • Jan. 26 – Province named advisors to Debt Adjustment Board.
  • Feb. 4 – Temperature dropped to 40 below zero for six days.
  • Feb. 8 – CPR president E. W. Beatty urged amalgamation of railways.
  • Mar. 27 – Winnipeg Grain Exchange threatened to move to Fort William if government imposed 2 per cent wage tax.
  • Mar. 31 – University of Manitoba board of governors resigned after embezzlement inquiry tabled severely critical report. – Two members of Winnipeg Toilers basketball team killed in Kansas air crash, several injured.
  • Apr. 18 – Mrs. U. N. Macdonell was first woman president of Manitoba Teachers’ Society.
  • Apr. 28 – D. C. Coleman named chancellor of U of M, new board included Mrs. H. M. Speechly, first woman member.
  • May 1 – Winnipeg Masquers Club won first prize at Dominion Drama Festival.
  • May 3-6 – Legislature passed 2 per cent wage tax, mass meeting on Legislature building grounds protested tax.
  • June 15 – Winnipeg schools closed two weeks early for lack of funds.
  • June 29 – St. Boniface council refused to resign over bond issue; W. C. McKinnell named by province to supervise city’s affairs.
  • July 20 – Police used tear gas to break up unemployed riot at city hall.
  • July 26 – Riding Mountain National Park opened. – 25,000 attended Unemployed Association picnic at River Park.
  • Aug. 9 – Four naval reservists drowned on Lake Winnipeg.
  • Aug. 15 – Wheat price was pegged at Winnipeg, May 76 5/8, October 70 1/8.
  • Sept. 8 – Minimum wage for women was cut to $11 a week.
  • Sept. 29 – Manitoba huskies left for Adm. Byrd’s South Pole expedition.
  • Oct. 5 – J. A. Machray, imprisoned for university, Anglican church embezzlement, died in Stony Mountain penitentiary.
  • Oct. 19 – Manitoba Pool Elevators showed $309,000 profit.
  • Nov. 14 – Lake Winnipeg fisheries investigation charged that a combine existed among fish dealers.
  • Nov. 21 – Stefan Stechuk, 24, who died after saving 12 from boarding house fire, was given civic funeral by Winnipeg.
  • Dec. 4 – Province’s radio station CKY lost monopoly status, James A. Richardson received licence to operate radio station.
  • Dec. 27 – Winnipeg Monarchs ice hockey team, touring Europe, received silver trophy from Adolf Hitler, German chancellor.

Hard times hit phones

1934

  • Jan. 27 – Winnipeg doctors refused to provide medical aid to unemployed until municipal and provincial governments reached policy on medical relief.
  • Feb. 12 – Manitoba Telephone Commission reported loss of $158,000. 5,000 subscribers cancelled contracts.
  • Feb. 19 – Housing survey in Winnipeg showed average of three families living in each of 382 homes.
  • Feb. 24 – James McDiarmid, pioneer contractor who completed the Legislative Building after 1915 scandal, died at 79.
  • Mar. 2 – Engineer and fireman were killed in train wreck at Carberry.
  • Mar. 6 – Mortgage companies told Legislature committee they were not pursuing a policy of foreclosing on delinquent accounts.
  • Mar. 9 – Dr. J. A. MacLean, 21 years president of University of Manitoba, announced retirement.
  • Mar. 29 – Minimum Wage Act amended to fix amount of pay and number of hours worked.
  • Apr. 10 – RCMP ordered to probe Farmers’ Unity League, suspected of Communist connection.
  • Apr. 19 – Ten per cent federal tax on gold mines expected to have serious effect on Manitoba operations.
  • May 29 – Canadian Airways headquarters was moved from Montreal to Winnipeg.
  • May 31 – Temperature in Morden 106, Winnipeg 99.5, setting continental record.
  • June 2 – Manitoba announced plan to move cattle from drought area of southwest, to number 50,000.
  • June 6 – 18 injured in battle between Canadian Nazi party and Communists on Market Square, Winnipeg.
  • June 9 – 1,000 miners on strike at Flin Flon.
  • June 19 – Ottawa announced $5,600,000 relief work plans for Manitoba, including new Selkirk Bridge, new federal building in Winnipeg. – CIL let contract for high explosive plant at East Selkirk.
  • June 30 – Riot broke out at Flin Flon in connection with strike.
  • July 5 – A. W. Austin, who started first horse-drawn trams in Winnipeg, died in Toronto; aged 77.
  • Aug. 7 – Sidney E. Smith arrived to take over presidency of University of Manitoba.
  • Aug. 20 – SS Nascopie docked at Churchill, with HBC governor Ashby aboard.
  • Sept. 11 – Manitoba Medical Association proposed contributory health insurance operated by government.
  • Sept. 28 – Sheriff Colin Inkster, 91, died after holding office for 52 years.
  • Oct. 17 – Wings Ltd. proposed air route from Winnipeg to London, over Arctic.
  • Oct. 31 – Archbishop I. O. Stringer of Rupert’s Land, died at 68.
  • Nov. 19 – W. J. Tupper appointed lieutenant-governor.
  • Dec. 8 – Provincial government instituted inquiry into cost of school text books.
  • Dec. 13 – Right Rev. M. T. M. Harding, Bishop of Qu-Appelle, elected Archbishop of Rupert’s Land.
  • Dec. 29 – G. H. Barefoot elected mayor of St. Boniface.

c-63

Monarchs win world hockey

1935

JANUARY

  • Jan. 3 – G. H. Barefoot sworn in as mayor of St. Boniface, first Labor candidate to hold the office.
  • Jan. 12 – Triplets born in Winnipeg to Mrs. And Mrs. W. H. Duff.
  • Jan. 19 – Winnipeg Children’s Home celebrated its 50th anniversary.
  • Jan. 23 – Coldest day in 26 years with temperatures at new low record of 43.2 below zero.
  • Jan. 28 – Winnipeg Monarchs won world amateur hockey title in Switzerland.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 2 – Most Rev. M. T. M. Harding installed as Archbishop of Rupert’s Land.
  • Feb. 3 – First ski train left Winnipeg for new resort at La Riviere.
  • Feb. 23 – Archbishop A. A. Sinnott celebrated his 25th anniversary in the priesthood.
  • Feb. 26 – Institute of Conservation organized to help fight drought conditions and causes.

MARCH

  • Mar. 1 – Printers on Winnipeg newspapers formed local union after break with International Typographical Union.
  • Mar. 3 – Assessment on property slashed by $20,000,000 in Winnipeg.
  • Mar. 5 – Manitoba got record snowfall, 17 inches in 24 hours.
  • Mar. 11 – Bank of Canada opened branch in Winnipeg and issued new bills.
  • Mar. 12 – Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy held annual meeting in Winnipeg. – Winnipeg city council rejected a move to tax churches.
  • Mar. 13 – Patrick Meehan awarded “miner’s VC” for rescue work during San Antonio mine accident.
  • Mar. 15 – Former lieutenant-governor, J. D. McGregor died.
  • Mar. 29 – Legislature refused Winnipeg the right to cancel tax exemptions for railways.

APRIL

  • April 8 – E. K. Brown appointed head of English department at U. of M.
  • April 15 – Earl and Countess of Bessborough paid final visit to Manitoba as term of governor-general ends.
  • April 17 – 20 mining parties planned exploration work in northern Manitoba.
  • April 18 – Liquor prices in Manitoba cut drastically.
  • April 25 – Dr. A. W. Cowperthwaite appointed principal of provincial Normal School.
  • April 29 – One convict dead, several wounded in riot at stony Mountain penitentiary.

MAY

  • May 1 – Ephraim Kort, 21, sentenced to 10 years in prison, 10 lashes for Ashern bank holdup.
  • May 3 – Boy Scout founder Lord Baden-Powell visited Manitoba.
  • May 6 – 30,000 from all over province marked King George V’s Silver Jubilee at Legislature Building. – St. Boniface reported it was “out of the red” for the first time in years.
  • May 8 – Two-inch rain, the heaviest in several years, brought hope to the drought areas of the province.
  • May 10 – Chain letter craze arrived in Manitoba.
  • May 25 – First shipment of horses ever handled by Union Stockyards was dispatched to U.S.
  • May 30 – Veterans of the Northwest Rebellion held three-day celebration of the 60th anniversary of campaign.

JUNE

  • June 3 – King’s birthday honors list included people from Winnipeg, Portage la Prairie and Alexander.
  • June 5 – Southern Manitoba hit by heaviest June frost in 18 years. Relief food allowances were increased by 10 per cent.
  • June 10 – Premier Bracken asked Ottawa to stop the On-to-Ottawa trek of single unemployed which had started in Vancouver.
  • June 11 – Provincial, city, military and police authorities met to plan feeding and housing if Ottawa trek reached city.
  • June 20 – 150 Canadian army veterans camped on lawn in front of Deer Lodge hospital to ask better treatment.
  • June 21 – Ottawa approved Greater Winnipeg sewage treatment project.
  • June 28 – Tribune, Manitoba Motor League motorcade left for Duluth and Fort William.

JULY

  • July 2 – New Trans-Canada Highway link between Kenora and Fort William opened.
  • July 3 – Single unemployed stated they would continue to press their demands, despite breakup of trek to Ottawa after Dominion Day riot in Regina. 10,000 attended mass meeting to support trekkers.
  • July 5 – Dr. J. H. Craigie of the Dominion Rust Research laboratory reported wheat rust in Red River valley crops.
  • July 8 – $900,000 highway program approved by federal, provincial authorities.
  • July 10 – Three carloads of single unemployed en route to Kenora stopped, questioned by RCMP at Beausejour.
  • July 24 – One man killed in oil refinery explosion at Morris.
  • July 27 – Theo. Dubois won Tribune Winnipeg – Winnipeg Beach bicycle marathon.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 1 – Weather office reported Manitoba temperatures in July were highest of any year on record.
  • Aug. 6 – Icelanders celebrate 60th anniversary of founding of Gimli.
  • Aug. 7 – City alderman H. Andrews killed by car in traffic accident.
  • Aug. 10 – Andrews inquest jury recommends that pedestrian traffic be controlled.
  • Aug. 12 – Winnipeg council approved partial restoration of pay cuts for civic employees.
  • Aug. 15 – Hon. J. T. Haig, KC, and Hon. H. A. Mullins appointed to represent Manitoba in Senate.
  • Aug. 22 – Worst hail storm in 27 years damages gardens, flattens crops.
  • Aug. 31 – Province promises investigation of bread price war in Winnipeg.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 3 – Premier Mitchell Hepburn of Ontario addressed large public meeting in Winnipeg.
  • Sept. 6 – Part of the Winnipeg school board employee pay cut was restored.
  • Sept. 9 – Jackie Pike, 5, found after being lost four days in bush south of St. Vital, died.
  • Sept. 10 – Ottawa announced a $2,5000,000 road and bridge program for Manitoba.
  • Sept. 14 – A. B. Dunlop, editor of the Neepawa Press, was elected president of the Manitoba section, Canadian Weekly Newspaper’s Association.
  • Sept. 19 – Wheat went up the full allowable limit under the price-pegging regulation.
  • Sept. 23 – Wheat Board set 50 cents as minimum price for feed wheat.
  • Sept. 25 – Medical examination required for all candidates for Normal School training.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 1 – Wheat price reached $1. on Winnipeg futures market. Large counterfeiting outfit seized by police.
  • Oct. 2 – Two murders, unconnected, discovered – that of Norman East, and Mrs. F. Pengelly.
  • Oct. 7 – Nomination day for federal election, Social Credit candidates named in all Winnipeg constituencies.
  • Oct. 8 – Dean of Canterbury, England, Rev. Hewlett Johnson (later known as The Red Dean) spoke to large public meeting in favor of Social Credit.
  • Oct. 13 – Brother Joseph, principal of St. Boniface College, died.
  • Oct. 14 – Federal election, record vote cast in Manitoba and 14 Liberals, two Conservatives and two CCF elected. Souris constituency in doubt, recount asked.
  • Oct. 18 – Winnipeg council offered plan for hotel, bus terminal and theatre complex on Memorial Blvd.
  • Oct. 23 – Man charged with impersonation at polls got 18-month jail sentence.
  • Oct. 29 – First blizzard of the winter.
  • Oct. 30 – Three pickets arrested for trouble during cap manufacturing company strike. John Queen nominated to seek re-election as mayor.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 1 – Well-known U.S. evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson held meeting in Walker Theatre.
  • Nov. 2 – Winnipeg Rugby team defeated Regina Rough-riders in western final.
  • Nov. 5 – Winnipeg cut rates for water supply.
  • Nov. 6 – Alderman C. H. mayoralty of Winnipeg.
  • Nov. 8 – Some Winnipeg doctors supported “right to die,” a topic being widely discussed.
  • Nov. 11 – Armistice Day service attended by Prince Juan de Bourbon of the exiled Spanish royal family.
  • Nov. 16 – G. H. Barefoot nominated to seek re-election as mayor of St. Boniface.
  • Nov. 19 – Employees at 19 Winnipeg bakeries on strike. – M. E. Nichols, vice-president and general manager of The Tribune named to take similar position with Vancouver Sun.
  • Nov. 22 – Barry Bucham acquitted on charge of murdering Norman East. – John Queen re-elected mayor of Winnipeg with 10,000 majority.
  • Nov. 28 – Arnold Lundberg, Donald Lambert brought to Winnipeg for treatment for severe frostbite, after they were rescued following seven days marooned on rock in Lake Winnipeg.
  • Nov. 30 – Winnipeg tax collections up to $19,000 over 1934.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 2 – Four men convicted on four separate charges of motor manslaughter.
  • Dec. 4 – Union of Manitoba Municipalities asked government to continue distribution of feed, seed grain.
  • Dec. 7 – Winnipeg rugby team defeated Hamilton Tigers to win Canadian championship.
  • Dec. 10 – Large crowd greeted Winnipeg Rugby team in 23 below zero weather, on return from East.
  • Dec. 15 – W. G. Smith of Dauphin, was issued the first “snowmobile” licence by province.
  • Dec. 18 – Manitoba Boxing Commission – J. I. Morkin, KC, W. P. Fillmore and Bruce Boreham – resigned.
  • Dec. 23 – Community Chest ended campaign, with $271,000 collected of $348,000 target.
  • Dec. 24 – New boxing commission named – Dr. P. J. Gallaher, J. R. Jamieson and J. E. Ferguson.
  • Dec. 27 – G. F. Chipman, noted agriculturist and editor killed in hunting accident.
  • Dec. 28 – Winnipeg city treasurer H. C. Thompson announced city’s income would balance expenditures.

c-66

Court spanked juveniles during flu-ridden year

1936

JANUARY

  • Jan. 6 – Hundreds of school children absent due to mild ’flu epidemic. – 250 back at work in CNR Transcona shops after layoff.
  • Jan. 10 – The Tribune installed new color presses.
  • Jan. 14 – Winnipeg increased firemen’s pay. – Well-known newspaperman, T. B. Robertson, died.
  • Jan. 15 – University of Manitoba opened courses for general public.
  • Jan. 16 – Winnipeg Electric Co. made second attempt to sell power to city.
  • Jan. 18 – Payroll bandits got $1,600 after kidnapping messenger for short time.
  • Jan. 20 – Influenza cases in province numbered in thousands. – Special classes for young unemployed attract 1,030.
  • Jan. 22 – Charles Pogue claimed invention of carburetor which would give 200 miles to the gallon of gas.
  • Jan. 23 – Thermometer hit 43.2. below. – Sewage disposal scheme provided jobs for 1,000.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 4 – Controversy over store hours split Retail Merchants Association. – H. M Sutherland, ex-mayor of St. Boniface died.
  • Feb. 7 – Constable Charles Gillis died after shooting by holdup man.
  • Feb. 11 – Number of juveniles spanked in court for breaking into Fort Garry homes.
  • Feb. 20 – Manitoba Telephone System profit of $390,000 announced.
  • Feb. 21 – War veterans protested a reduction in hospital grants.
  • Feb. 24 – Gunman got $4,000 in holdup at Crescent Creamery. – Le Cercle Moliere won regional drama festival.
  • Feb. 26 – Winnipeg Hydro profit was $13,000.
  • Feb. 27 – Heavy snow reported from many parts of province.

MARCH

  • Mar. 1 – Provincial estimates of $14,000,000 tabled in Legislature, an increase of $14,000 over 1935.
  • Mar. 4 – University of Manitoba council replaced by Board of Governors.
  • Mar. 7 – Three men arrested for Crescent Creamery holdup.
  • Mar. 10 – Attorney-General W. J. Major blamed agitators for riot at Headingley Jail.
  • Mar. 11 – Legislature defeated bill concerning chiropractors.
  • Mar. 13 – Hydro cut off power to building where tenants refused to pay bills.
  • Mar. 14 – 700 snowshoers searched for man, missing six days.
  • Mar. 17 – Married persons with wage under $1,200 exempted from paying provincial wage tax.
  • Mar. 18 – Blizzard stalled traffic in south-eastern part of province, Red River Valley.
  • Mar.19 – St. Boniface cut tax rate three mills.
  • Mar. 25 – Mr. Justice A. B. Hudson appointed to Supreme Court of Canada.
  • Mar. 31 – Bakeries raised bread prices one cent a loaf.

APRIL

  • April 6 – Citizens took out flood insurance as cold weather slowed spring thaw.
  • April 7 – Police conducted drive against “charity” rackets. City fire department answered 60 calls in one 24-hour period.
  • April 8 – Drifts of mixed dust and snow partially blocked many highways in south of province.
  • April 9 – Magistrate R. B. Graham sharply criticized public school training.
  • April 15 – Brandon and Portage la Prairie areas flooded.
  • April 17 – The Tribune, Manitoba Motor League and Tourist bureau sponsored action on new highway between Kenora and Fort Frances.
  • April 21 – Floods receded as ice in rivers broke up.
  • April 27 – St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church celebrated its 60th anniversary.
  • April 29 – Premier Bracken took over agriculture ministry.

MAY

  • May 1 – School students started safety patrols. Three armed men got $2,300 from Parkhill Bedding Co.
  • May 4 – Street car operator shot in lonely River Park area.
  • May 5 – North Kildonan landmark, the old Henderson house, destroyed by fire.
  • May 11 – Dr. A. H. R. Buller retired from university staff.
  • May 15 – 20 students at Isaac Newton School went on strike.
  • May 19 – Winnipeg Electric Co. signs one cent an hour pay increase for 900 employees.
  • May 26 – Replica of the Lourdes Shrine opened in St. Boniface
  • May 27 – Canada’s first cardinal, Cardinal Villeneuve visited Manitoba.

JUNE

  • June 5 – Panicky bandit dropped $600 loot while fleeing after holding up Beausejour bank.
  • June 8 – Widespread rains ended long dry spell.
  • June 9 – W. Sanford Evans resigned as leader of Manitoba Conservative.
  • June 10 – Errick F. Willis named new Conservative leader.
  • June 12 – Premier Bracken announced provincial election for July 27.
  • June 15 – Four drowned in Winnipeg River mishap.
  • June 19 – Bank bandit captured after running fight at midday on downtown Winnipeg street.
  • June 23 – Election campaign began throughout Manitoba
  • June 27 – Unemployed smashed street car windows.

JULY

  • July 1 – 7,000 Ukrainians attended Dominion Day celebration which featured music, dances of native land.
  • July 3 – Meat packing firms charged with unfair trading; Ottawa to investigate. –Droughts seared crops.
  • July 6 – Temperature at 96 above. – Wheat again hits five cent limit in upward move.
  • July 8 – High temperature for day was 111 degrees.
  • July 13 – Heat wave continued; 22 dead of prostration in Manitoba; day’s high ws 110.
  • July 18 – Gunman robbed dry cleaners of $1,500.
  • July 21 – Winnipeg garment industry halted as 900 workers go on strike.
  • July 27 – Election day, hot.
  • July 28 – Early returns showed Bracken government would not have majority. Former judge Stubbs topped Winnipeg polls with 24,000 votes, Communist second.
  • July 31 – Election results following proportional representation transfers gave government 22 seats, opposite 31, with two seats deferred.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 3 – Alex Calder, noted pioneer, died at age of 95.
  • Aug. 4 – 20,000 attended opening of new Winnipeg exhibition.
  • Aug. 5 – Opposition parties refused to take part in coalition.
  • Aug. 8 – Lord Tweedsmuir, new governor-general, made first official visit to Manitoba.
  • Aug. 11 – Sturgeon reported dying as power plants caused drop in level of Winnipeg River.
  • Aug. 13 – Irate businessmen clamored as exhibition failed to pay its bills.
  • Aug. 15 – Social Credit MLAs repudiated a reported deal to support Bracken government.
  • Aug. 18 – Outbreak of infantile paralysis (polio) reported in several areas of Manitoba.
  • Aug. 22 – Premier Bracken re-elected in The Pas deferred vote.
  • Aug. 26 – Man, wife and two daughters found after being lost in bush for 53 hours.
  • Aug. 29 – Premier Bracken decides to carry on in office.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 1 – Manitoba breweries asked government to give protection against competition from outside firms.
  • Sept. 2 – Social Credit members reported to be ready to support Bracken administration.
  • Sept. 4 – Inventor J. Forbes claimed perfection of a device to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning.
  • Sept. 18 – Infantile paralysis cases number 154.
  • Sept. 21 – Stewart Garson, Ivan Schultz and D. L. Campbell were sworn in as new members of provincial cabinet.
  • Sept. 26 – Former mayor and MLA-elect Ralph Webb announced he would again seek Winnipeg mayoralty.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 1 – Increase in milk prices refused by Municipal and Public Utilities Board.
  • Oct. 3 – Chinese girl freed after period of near-slavery in Winnipeg suburb.
  • Oct. 6 – Bandits kidnapped store accountant, got $800. – Government investigated furriers strike.
  • Oct. 15 – Unemployed youth classes drew 2,000 students.
  • Oct. 17 – Premier Bracken announced proposal to cut farm debt. – J. Peterson, Manitoba’s oldest immigrant, died at age of 96.
  • Oct. 19 – Provincial government declared it would not force single unemployed men to take farm jobs.
  • Oct. 20 – Manitoba Social Credit convention decided to force a new election “as soon as Manitoba is ready for the Aberhart (Alberta) plan.”
  • Oct. 23 – Exhibition still owed $10,000 to city firms.
  • Oct. 26 – Armed man got $3,000 in raid on gambling house.
  • Oct. 28 – Retail merchants of province asked for abolition of holiday on Boxing Bay.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 2 – Manitoba Paper Co. offered to buy record amount – 90,000 cords – of wood for winter operations.
  • Nov. 3 – Five strike pickets jailed for assault.
  • Nov. 4 – Manitoba Agricultural College celebrated its 30th anniversary.
  • Nov. 7 – Mortgage companies announced a voluntary reduction in farm debts.
  • Nov. 13 – Province offered to aid victims of infantile paralysis.
  • Nov. 18 – Militia regiments in Manitoba reorganized.
  • Nov. 19 – Two fishermen risked death to save horses on Lake Winnipeg ice.
  • Nov. 20 – Dr. F. E. Warriner elected mayor of Winnipeg on second count.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 1 – Ottawa announced $120,000 grant to improve Winnipeg airport.
  • Dec. 8 – Manitoba liquor commission increased price of beer from outside province to 25 cents a bottle.
  • Dec. 14 – Doctors claimed single unemployed were getting more food than they needed.
  • Dec. 16 – MLA-elect L. St. G. Stubbs called for a government inquiry into the beer situation.
  • Dec. 17 – Liquor commission banned eastern ale from beer parlors on grounds of over-strength.
  • Dec. 18 – Christmas sales broke records for Thirties.
  • Dec. 24 – Share the Wealth Party formed, planned to seek left-wing coalition.

c-68

Students clad ‘immodest’ statue

1937

JANUARY

  • Jan. 2 – Canadian Wheat Board announced sales during 1935 crop year totalled 271,000,000.
  • Jan. 4 – Traffic in most of Manitoba snarled by 30-mile-per-hour blizzard.
  • Jan. 5 – U. of M. female students decided statue of Venus on display was immodest, draped it in cheesecloth.
  • Jan. 7 – Mrs. Jessie McLennan became first woman elected Winnipeg school board chairman.
  • Jan. 10 – Winter’s first ski train to La Riviere took 312 to resort.
  • Jan. 15 – Cold spell over entire west with thermometer at 32 below zero.
  • Jan. 20 – New taxicab board increased fare schedule for cabs.
  • Jan. 21 – Georgina McQuarrie, Winnipeg saved her seven brothers and sisters from their burning home.
  • Jan. 29 – Dr. A. B. Baird, 89, ended a half-century educational career in Manitoba.
  • Jan. 30 – Magistrate R. B. Graham criticized what he called “strongarm” methods of city police liquor squad.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 2 – Premier Bracken, Social Credit MLAs reached understanding to give government support in Legislature.
  • Feb. 3 – Manitoba union spokesmen predicted railway strike over terms of McLean mediation report.
  • Feb. 4 – Traffic accidents in province during 1936 numbered 1,679, with 619 involving pedestrians.
  • Feb. 6 – Winnipeg council approved spending $100,000 to resettle another 125 families on farms.
  • Feb. 9 – Manitoba’s 49th annual bonspiel opened.
  • Feb. 10 – Dr. G. P. McRostie, W. H. Silversides claimed discovery of an anti-dandelion chemical.
  • Feb. 12 – Police started stiffer enforcement of Lord’s Day Act.
  • Feb. 15 – Harry Kempster, long-time labor leader died.
  • Feb. 16 – Former premier Sir Rodmond P. Roblin died in U.S. – Dr. D. A. Stewart, superintendent of Ninette Sanatorium died.
  • Feb. 18 – Speech from Throne forecast legislation to outlaw strikes and lockouts, and amend Securities Act.
  • Feb. 23 – Province’s liquor profits for 1936 $1,200,000, an increase of $107,000.
  • Feb. 25 – William Morton, alias May, killed in battle with Const. L. H. Davies of Winnipeg police force.

MARCH

  • Mar. 1 – Brenda Bennett, Winnipeg singer who played leading roles with D’Oyly Carte Opera Company in Britain, visited city.
  • Mar. 2 – Gunman fired on flour mill employee during daylight holdup.
  • Mar. 5 – Winnipeg MLA Marcus Hyman startled Legislature with charges of irregularities during 1936 election, claimed “beer flowed like water” in North End.
  • Mar. 9 – St. Boniface increased employees’ pay five per cent, balanced 1937 budget.
  • Mar. 10 – Bandits fired shots at North End merchant, got away with $4.50.
  • Mar. 12 – Winnipeg council balanced budget without increasing mill rate.
  • Mar. 18 – Bread price increased cent a loaf to avert price war.
  • Mar. 22 – Skeleton of Julia Johnson, missing since April 1928, found in boiler of vacant warehouse.
  • Mar. 23 – Police conducted roundup of suspects, witnesses in Julia Johnson disappearance.
  • Mar. 27 – Winnipeg, St. James signed agreement on operation and development of Stevenson Field.
  • Mar. 29 – Const. William Fraser injured, four captured in crackdown on robbers, safe-crackers.
  • Mar. 30 – Manitoba railway employees benefitted by several hundred thousand dollars a year as new pay agreement accepted.
  • Mar. 31 – Thousands turned out for funeral of Julia Johnson.

APRIL

  • Apr. 2 – Movie star Deanna Durbin visited her home town.
  • Apr. 3 – Prominent city merchant J. A. Banfield died.
  • Apr. 8 – Bandits kidnapped cab driver, got $1,400 Paulin Chambers payroll.
  • Apr. 9 – Najib Jussuf, Arab and Moishe Erem, Jew, visited Winnipeg to make joint pleas for understanding and co-operation in Palestine (now Israel).
  • Apr. 12 – Huge overhead counterweight on Osborne Bridge crashed to bridge deck, closing street for several days. Bridge-opened span later sealed and steel super-structure removed.
  • Apr. 14 – Manitoba blanketed by eight inches of snow.
  • Apr. 15 – Lorne Munroe, 12, ’cellist prodigy, offered trip to Britain to play there, by festival adjudicator Arthur Benjamin.
  • Apr. 19 – Gunmen got $2,400 in Brewery Products Ltd. Holdup.
  • Apr. 22 – Winnipeg Monarchs swept entire series of eastern exhibition hockey games.
  • Apr. 26 – Nine injured when street car overturned at Stafford and Corydon.
  • Apr. 30 – Selkirk citizens “unofficially” lowered span on completed but unused bridge across Red River.

MAY

  • May 3 – Rotary International district held 24th annual meeting in Winnipeg.
  • May 4 – Winnipeg council approved new work-for-relief policy.
  • May 12 – Numerous ceremonies in Manitoba held to celebrate coronation of King George VI.
  • May 13 – Well-known actor in former Winnipeg theatrical companies, “Doc” Howden died.
  • May 17 – Manitoba-born explorer Vilhjalmur Stefansson said Winnipeg was strategically placed to be centre for world air routes.
  • May 18 – Home improvements exempted from taxes for five years by Winnipeg council.
  • May 19 – U of M graduates 508 students. – Social Credit leader in Manitoba, Dr. S. W. Fox, MLA sought on charge of performing illegal operation.
  • May 20 – Manitoba wheat-growing areas got long, soaking rain.
  • May 21 – Const. M. McKellar died of injuries received in hit-and-run accident.
  • May 22 – 500 fewer families reported on relief.
  • May 25 – Jury at Julia Johnson inquest “baffled” by conflicting evidence.
  • May 28 – Mayor F. E. Warriner of Winnipeg said city branded with radicalism, new industry frightened off.

JUNE

  • June 2 – Manitoba government called for uniform penal system across Canada.
  • June 7 – General rains gave Manitoba farmers hope for the best harvest in 25 years.
  • June 8 – Board of Trade proposed a tax on rents, city manager system for Winnipeg.
  • June 9 – Manitoba Motor League charged that poor roads were hindering tourist trade growth.
  • June 10 – Banks refused municipal loans to cover relief costs.
  • June 11 – Premier rejected municipal plea for relief aid, said the problem was Ottawa’s.
  • June 17 – A. D. Marrin appointed chairman of new Milk Board.
  • June 21 – First Ottawa-Winnipeg flight within one day, made by department of Transport aeroplane.
  • June 28 – Josephine Wolfe, a non-swimmer, “floundered” five miles to Lake Winnipeg shore, got assistance for three companions adrift 72 hours on houseboat.

JULY

  • July 2 – Reports of drought, rust in West push wheat up the five cent limit on Winnipeg Grain Exchange.
  • July 6 – Charge of procuring an abortion laid against Dr. S. W. Fox, MLA, dropped when it was revealed he had married the complainant.
  • July 12 – Month-old baby escaped injury during wild ride in stolen car.
  • July 14 – Man sentenced to nine years for bigamy, theft.
  • July 19 – Dr. Norman Bethune, Canadian doctor, spoke to overflow audience in Walker Theatre about Spanish civil war.
  • July 22 – Hail storm ruined 90,000 bushels wheat in southern Manitoba.
  • July 24 – Fewer persons reported on relief in past week than in any week since 1932.
  • July 27 – CCF national convention held in Winnipeg.
  • July 29 – Department of transport aeroplane stopped briefly in Winnipeg on trans-Canada flight.
  • July 31 – Winnipeg relief rolls showed a drop of 800 in week.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 2 – D. J. Allan killed by lightning at Pipestone.
  • Aug. 3 – Double suicide reported from Sifton.
  • Aug. 4 – International tourist convention held in Winnipeg.
  • Aug. 7 – Swift Canadian Limited announced plans for $2,000,000 packing plant in St. Boniface.
  • Aug. 8 – Bobby Reith won Western Manitoba open golf title.
  • Aug. 17 – H. Bullick-Kenyon, Hubert Wilkins used Winnipeg as main base in search for Russian fliers missing in Arctic.
  • Aug. 20 – Cooler weather gave hope of halting horse disease present in rural parts of province. – Heather Leslie retained Manitoba Women’s Golf Championship.
  • Aug. 24 – Declining birth rate resulted in marked drop in public school enrolment.
  • Aug. 30 – Transcona schools delayed opening due to prevalence of infantile paralysis.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 7 – Provincial health authorities expressed alarm over the spread of infantile paralysis.
  • Sept 10 – 104 cases of paralysis reported, iron lung imported.
  • Sept. 11 – Heather Leslie won Canadian Closed Golf title.
  • Sept. 14 – First annual charity Horse Show held.
  • Sept. 16 – Manitoba hotel men asked relaxation of beer sale rules.
  • Sept. 17 – Cooler weather reduced number of paralysis cases.
  • Sept. 25 – Hubert Wilkins at Lac Du Bonnet in continuing search for missing Soviet aviators.
  • Sept. 18 – Manitoba’s crop reported worth $52,000,000; double worth of any crop since 1929, and the best since 1920.
  • Sept. 27 – Chief Justice J. D. A. Macdonald retired, was appointed to Court of King’s Bench 1906, became chief justice of Manitoba in 1927.
  • Sept. 28 – New Milk Board ordered equalization of prices for milk whether delivered or bought at stores.
  • Sept. 30 – Farm area moisture tables benefitted from rain, snow.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 1 – Manitoba Cooperative conference secretary J. T. Hull claimed free market in wheat ws a myth.
  • Oct. 2 – Brandon Board of Trade proposed highway from Peace Garden to The Pas, 400 miles.
  • Oct. 7 – Provincial, civic and railway officials celebrated 60th anniversary of arrival of Countess of Dufferin locomotive.
  • Oct. 8 – U. of M. president Sidney E. Smith rebuked students for using Cenotaph during initiation pranks despite protests of veterans.
  • Oct. 12 – 1,300 employees of Winnipeg Electric Co. had 13 per cent pay cut restored.
  • Oct. 15 – Two runways and taxi strip at Stevenson Field were opened by Lieutenant -Governor W. J. Tupper, KC.
  • Oct. 21 – Sam Larcombe, long prominent in agricultural circles, died at Birtle, aged 85.
  • Oct. 23 – Two Winnipeg hotel maids were offered $5,000 for half share of their Irish sweepstakes ticket.
  • Oct. 27 – Former chief justice J. D. A. Macdonald died.
  • Oct. 31 – Rev. C. W. Gordon, better known as novelist Ralph Conner, died.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 1 – Winnipeg Community Chest target set at $363,000.
  • Nov. 2 – Winnipeg city council debated boycotting Japanese goods on account of Japan’s aggression in China.
  • Nov. 10 – Tribune Empty Stock Fund target was $12,000.
  • Nov. 11 – Winnipeg Blue Bombers won Western Canadian rugby championship.
  • Nov. 13 – Petition with 12,000 signatures asked Milk Board to rescind milk price equalization order.
  • Nov. 14 – Between two and 10 inches snow fell during first storm of winter.
  • Nov. 16 – Work started on new hangar for Trans-Canada Air Lines.
  • Nov. 22 – Stockbroker T. C. Anderson got four-year term for theft of customers’ securities.
  • Nov. 23 – Dog poisoner blamed in death of 13 dogs.
  • Nov. 26 – John Queen was elected mayor of Winnipeg.
  • Nov. 27 – Severe cold spell descended on prairies.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 1 – Good Roads Branch program to keep Manitoba roads open for winter.
  • Dec. 2 – Winnipeg revived 30-year-old anti-spitting bylaw.
  • Dec. 10 – Legislature opened early.
  • Dec. 11 – Blue Bombers lost Canadian title to Toronto Argos, 4-3.
  • Dec. 17 – Gunmen got $1,700 in St. Boniface holdup.
  • Dec. 20 – Winnipeg publisher C. D. Stovel died in Minneapolis.
  • Dec. 21 – Rural MLA urged Winnipeg be placed under administrator.
  • Dec. 23 – Empty Stocking Fund went over the top. – Bob Fritz was released as Blue Bomber coach.
  • Dec. 24 – 250 children marched to safety when Brandon theatre burned.
  • Dec. 25 – Police arrested three men trying to tunnel into store.

c-69

1938

JANUARY

  • Jan. 5 – Winnipeg storekeeper and wife routed robbers with barrage of furniture.
  • Jan. 10 – Douglas McKay, member of Hudson’s Bay Co. Canadian Committee, died in U.S. air crash.
  • Jan. 12 – Nine-day search called off for pilot Mike Sawchyn, missing in Riding Mountain area.
  • Jan. 19 – Provincial estimates showed increase of $487,000 in spending.
  • Jan. 27 – Booth Fisheries employee wounded during holdup.
  • Jan. 29 – John E. Buchanan, former fire chief, died.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 7 – Provincial government forecast wage tax to be cut from 2 per cent to one per cent, bank and corporation taxes to be increased. – Good Neighbours Club won regional drama festival.
  • Feb. 10 – Legislature banned pinball machines.
  • Feb. 12 – Winnipeg had deficit of $1,000,000.
  • Feb. 15 – 100 homeless after Provencher Block, St. Boniface fire.
  • Feb. 17 – Ab Gowanlock, Glenboro won Consols.
  • Feb. 23 – Theatre manager scared off armed bandit.
  • Feb. 24 – The Great McCafferty, Pied Piper of Pubs, Winnipeg “character,” stopped a hockey game and disrupted the Legislature.

MARCH

  • Mar. 1 – TCA conducted first experimental air mail flight from Winnipeg to Vancouver.
  • Mar. 3 – Winnipeg got Legislature’s authority to increase business tax; statutory mill rate increase limit of 12 mills removed.
  • Mar. 4 – Winnipeg imposed sales tax.
  • Mar. 8 – Man charged with murder of old age pensioner at Grande Pointe.
  • Mar. 9 – Woman, two daughters, died in fire near Roblin.
  • Mar. 10 – Three convicts escaped from Stony Mountain penitentiary; one, injured, recaptured.
  • Mar. 14 – 31st Brandon Winter Fair opened.
  • Mar. 21 – Three injured, five planes destroyed when Winnipeg Flying Club hanger burned.
  • Mar. 28 – 20th Manitoba Musical Festival opened.

APRIL

  • Apr. 4 – Second of Stony Mountain escapees captured.
  • Apr. 5 – Contract let for new Swift plant in St. Boniface.
  • Apr. 9 – Two firemen hurt in Palace Restaurant fire.
  • Apr. 19 – Col. Royal Burritt appointed Headingley Jail governor.
  • Apr. 20 – Late snowfall blanketed province.
  • Apr. 21 – Rev. Adrien Morrice, veteran teacher, died.
  • Apr. 23 – Winnipeg Police criticized for death of man who was left unconscious in cell for five hours.
  • Apr. 26 – Number of dogs, cats poisoned. – Pilot Mike Sawchyn’s body found in swamp.
  • Apr. 30 – Four died when car ran off dock at Selkirk.

MAY

  • May 3 – Appeal court set aside conviction of T. C. Anderson, stockbroker, on theft charge.
  • May 5 – Whole province under deep blanket of snow.
  • May 6 – As result of inquest, city police rules were changed, requiring hospitalization of unconscious persons.
  • May 16 – Dominion Drama Festival opened in Winnipeg. – Governor-General Lord Tweedsmuir visited Manitoba.
  • May 17 – U of M graduated 477. – Winnipeg approves $1,5000,000 housing bylaw.
  • May 20 – R. D. Waugh, former Winnipeg mayor, former Allied Commissioner of Saar Valley, Manitoba liquor commissioner, died.
  • May 28 – Tramp shot during fight with North Kildonan storekeeper.
  • May 31 – Transcona school pupils staged strike to protest forced resignation of principal.

JUNE

  • June 2 – Marjorie Dick rescued John Skyhar from Red River.
  • June 4 – Joseph Blum kidnapped, robbed of $82.
  • June 6 – Sixtieth anniversary of Wesley College observed.
  • June 11 – Ten robbery suspects captured in police roundup.
  • June 15 – Office in Grain Exchange robbed of $9,000 in holdup.
  • June 21 – Thermometer indicated 89 degrees.
  • June 24 – 2,000 laid off for week by C.N.R.
  • June 28 – Gold brick artists robbed jeweller of $325.
  • June 29 – H. Carl Goldenberg appointed to conduct inquiry into Winnipeg finances.

JULY

  • July 1 – Rainy Dominion Day failed to halt celebrations.
  • July 2 – Experimental night flights between Winnipeg and Vancouver started by TCA.
  • July 5 – P. Graham Padwick, founder of Schools Orchestra died.
  • July 12 – Orangemen paraded to railway station for trip to Portage la Prairie undaunted by torrential rain.
  • July 14 – 3,000 waited in vain at airport as Howard Hughes’ round-the-world flight overflew Winnipeg.
  • July 16 – Ernie Palmer won Manitoba amateur golf title.
  • July 28 – Manitoba athlete Robina Higgins won four events in women athletes’ track and field meet.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 1 – Beach trains collided, four injured.
  • Aug. 2 – Hail damaged central and southern Manitoba crops.
  • Aug. 3 – Lightning storms in Winnipeg, hail in rural areas caused damage.
  • Aug. 8 – Boy was drowned at Garson, three drowned in Lake Winnipegosis.
  • Aug. 11 – City zoo told its lions must be disposed of as proper cages would be too costly.
  • Aug. 12 – Lodgers living in one room denied municipal vote.
  • Aug. 15 – Goldenberg probe of city finances opened.
  • Aug. 19 – Heavy losses reported in high wind storm.
  • Aug. 23 – Unrest was reported in Stony Mountain penitentiary.
  • Aug. 25 – Manitoba wheat crop estimated at 54,000,000 bu.
  • Aug. 27 – Five girls between ages of seven and 15 arrested for series of burglaries.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 2 – Department of Education inquired into failure rate of 48 per cent in Grade Eleven history.
  • Sept. 7 – Retirement at 70 proposed for city employees.
  • Sept. 8 – Gunman given four-year term in prison.
  • Sept. 10 – Provincial Treasurer S. S. Garson forecast $500,000 surplus.
  • Sept. 14 – War scare boosted wheat prices, depressed stocks on Winnipeg exchanges.
  • Sept. 20 – Travers Sweatman, KC, announced candidacy for Winnipeg mayoralty.
  • Sept. 21 – Last surviving brother of Louis Riel, Alexander, died at age of 76.
  • Sept. 29 – Serious bush fires out of control in southeastern Manitoba.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 1 – Wall of Transcona ice warehouse fell, injuring seven man.
  • Oct. 4 – W. C. Graham named as new principal of United (formerly Wesley) College.
  • Oct. 18 – Winter’s first snow storm general over Manitoba.
  • Oct. 27 – Prof. H. C. Etter, provincial superintendent of education, asked to resign by Education Minister Ivan Schultz, refused to do so.
  • Oct. 28 – Prof. Etter dismissed by cabinet order.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 1 – 23 nominated for St. Boniface civic elections.
  • Nov. 3 – One bandit captured, one escaped after gunfight with St. Boniface police.
  • Nov. 5 – Blue Bombers defeated Calgary Bronks in first game of western final, 12-7.
  • Nov. 6 – Starbuck fur farm robbed of 27 mink a few days after 117 stolen.
  • Nov. 12 – 32 candidates sought civic office in Winnipeg. John Queen, Travers Sweatman and E. D. Honeyman candidates for mayoralty. – Blue Bombers won western rugby title.
  • Nov. 14 – Bloodstained auto belonging to J. A. Kaesar of Moosomin, Sask., found in Winnipeg. – G. C. MacLean elected mayor of St. Boniface. J. H. Matthews won the Brandon federal by-election for the Liberals.
  • Nov. 15 – Kaesar’s bullet-riddled body found at Sintaluta, Sask.
  • Nov. 18 – H. Helpel, 24, of Winnipeg named as suspect in murder of Kaesar.
  • Nov. 21 – Trolley buses started operating in Winnipeg. – Helpel captured in Illinois.
  • Nov. 24 – Girl messenger robbed of $283.00
  • Nov. 28 – Queen elected mayor of Winnipeg on second choices.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 1 – Manitoba Icelanders marked 20th anniversary of Iceland’s sovereignty.
  • Dec. 14 – Winnipeg bankers gave $2,500 to Tribune Empty Stocking Fund.
  • Dec. 19 – Provincial treasurer reported debt had been reduced, and revenue was at record high mark.
  • Dec. 21 – $25,000 fire swept Shragge Metal Co.
  • Dec. 25 – Police report no arrests for drunken driving over holiday. – General Hugh M. Dyer died at 79 in Minnedosa.
  • Dec. 28 – Temperature dropped to 28 below zero.
  • Dec. 29 – Mother, three children burned to death in St. James.

c- 73

War produced new pressures, new problems

1939-40

1939

JANUARY

  • Jan. 12 – Gas explosion damaged University of Manitoba Science Building.
  • Jan. 23 – Death sentence on Raymond Vaudreuil for murder of Lloyd Higgins of Deerhorn, commuted.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 4 – Premier Bracken urged tariff reductions to help sell wheat.
  • Feb. 28 – Two died in home fire at Fannystelle.

MARCH

  • Mar. 8 – Influenza prevalent throughout Manitoba. – Winnipeg New Theatre won Manitoba regional award for Dominion Drama Festival.
  • Mar. 10 – Transcona CNR shops were preparing two locomotives for Royal tour later in year.
  • Mar. 13 – Stonewall team won Manitoba senior hockey title.
  • Mar. 18 – Education Minister Ivan Schultz announced sweeping changes in school curriculum.
  • Mar. 21 – Thomas, Kelly, Legislature Building contractor, died in California.
  • Mar. 30 – William Tier, U of M dean of arts and sciences, died.

APRIL

  • Apr. 5 – 126 of 170 municipalities showed business improvement, more tax revenue.
  • Apr. 13 – Tribune editor and writer for 45 years, J. J. Moncrieff, died.
  • Apr. 14 – Province imposed 50 mph speed limit on highways.
  • Apr. 15 – Province empowered municipalities to enter gasoline selling business.
  • Apr. 27 – St. James Municipal Hall burned.

MAY

  • May 5 – Typhoid outbreak in Selkirk called worst in many years.
  • May 16 – Winnipeg police equipped with two-way car radio.
  • May 17 – University of Manitoba graduated 448 students.
  • May 24 – King George VI and Queen Elizabeth in Manitoba. King made empire broadcast from Winnipeg.

JUNE

  • June 5 – $1,000,000 road program announced.
  • June 10 – Hon. T. A. Crerar opened highway to The Pas.
  • June 26 – Winnipeg grain merchant, business leader James A. Richardson died.
  • June 27 – Winnipeg had record of 229 days without fatal accident.

JULY

  • July 4 – Weddings recorded were at all-time high rate.
  • July 11 – Thermometers went up to 100.
  • July 17 – Ernie Palmer won Manitoba amateur golf title.
  • July 18 – Dr. Olafur Stephenson, 74, first Icelandic physician in Canada, died.
  • July 22 – CPR’s Weston shops working three shifts on grain cars.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 4 – Governor-General Lord Tweedsmuir passed through Winnipeg on trip to sub-Arctic region.
  • Aug. 23 – Wheat Board withheld offers of cash wheat price increase.
  • Aug. 24 – Dr. Robert Fletcher, deputy minister of education, retired.
  • Aug. 27 – Imminence of war brought out militia units to guard utilities.
  • Aug. 31 – Tribune goodwill motorcade left to inspect Highway 10.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 1 – Outbreak of Second World War.
  • Sept. 2 – Recruiting started. Prices of tea, flour, coffee rose.
  • Sept. 7 – All Manitoba militia units mobilized as hundreds joined ranks.
  • Sept. 15 – Liquor prices increased.
  • Sept. 16 – Winnipeg survivors of sinking of liner Athenia listed.
  • Sept. 22 – Winnipeg Maroons won Northern Baseball League title.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 15 – School teacher at Shakespeare school suspended for pro-Nazi sentiments.
  • Nov. 22 – William Morton, Gladstone MLA entered cabinet.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 1 – Milk price in Winnipeg rose cent a quart.
  • Dec. 4 – Tribune campaigned for clean-up of red tape tangle which was delaying allowances for airmen’s wives.
  • Dec. 5 – Manitoba contributed double its quota for Red Cross.
  • Dec. 25 – No snow, Winnipeg celebrated its second green Christmas of the century.

1940

JANUARY

  • Jan. 2 – Mr. Justice F. G. Taylor, Court of King’s Bench, former leader of the provincial Conservative Party and MLA from Portage la Prairie, died at the age of 62. – One of the first Manitobans to win a Second World War decoration, PO Roger Henderson, 22, awarded DFC.
  • Jan. 5 – C. H. McFadyen elected chairman of Winnipeg Parks Board.
  • Jan. 8 – First sod of Manitoba Sugar factory turned by Premier John Bracken.
  • Jan. 10 – News stories, letters to the editor criticized federal government for long delays in payment of dependents’ allowances. – Survey party for 23rd base line departed for their 1940 headquarters at Thicket Portage.
  • Jan. 11 – 11 per cent premium on U.S. money cost province $199,000 in making debt interest payments.
  • Jan. 15 – Manitoba deputy minister of public works Arthur McNamara, went to Ottawa to take charge of untangling red tape delaying service men’s dependents’ pay.
  • Jan. 16 – First two U.S.-built Hudson bombers landed near Emerson, towed across border by horses to evade U.S. Neutrality Act terms.
  • Jan. 18 – Industrial Development Bureau reported 80 of 119 Manitoba industries polled showed gains in business.
  • Jan. 19 – $100,000 fire destroyed one of Portage la Prairie’s oldest business buildings.
  • Jan. 22 – Wilfrid Boivin, 87, who came to Manitoba in 1870’s, farmed near St. Francois Xavier and Headingley, died.
  • Jan. 25 – Manitoba Cooperative Honey Producers held first annual meeting. – Rev. Johann Bjarnason, 74, pastor of Selkirk Icelandic Lutheran Church, formerly of Arborg, Riverton and Gimli, died.
  • Jan. 29 –Tthe Tribune celebrated its 50th anniversary.
  • Jan. 28 – Johnson Memorial Hospital opened at Gimli.
  • Jan. 30 – Samuel Desrosie, 112, who helped hid Dr. John Schultz after his escape from Riel, died at East St. Paul. – January, 1940 had least snow for 21 years, most rain in 27 years.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 1 – Health authorities said Brandon’s low infant mortality rate made it healthiest place in Canada for babies.
  • Feb. 3 – Bank figures, other statistics showed Manitoba was leading the West in business recovery.
  • Feb. 6 – 112 City of Winnipeg Squadron RCAF departed for overseas.
  • Feb. 12 – Const. John McDonald killed in gun fight with safe-crackers. Police hunted Mike (The Horse) Attamanchuk.
  • Feb. 13 – Attamanchuk, surrounded, committed suicide, two others captures.
  • Feb. 19 – Winnipeg bakery owner bequeathed her business to 13 employees.
  • Feb. 28 – Two men on trial as accessories in McDonald killing.

MARCH

  • Mar. 3 – Team motorman wounded by holdup man in Winnipeg.
  • Mar. 6 – Communist weekly paper office raided, editor John Weir and three others arrested under wartime security measures. – Provincial expenditures at record $26,000,000.
  • Mar. 8 – Howard Wood, Granite rink, won Canadian curling title.
  • Mar. 13 – Winnipeg named headquarters of No. 2 Air Training Command.
  • Mar. 21 – Air Force spokesman predicted five to 10 training airfields would be established in Manitoba.
  • Mar. 26 – Federal election; Manitobans elected 14 Liberals, one National Government (Cons.), one CCF and one Liberal-Progressive.
  • Mar. 28 – One death reported in St. Boniface typhoid epidemic.

APRIL

  • April 4 – Legislature rejected Winnipeg request for five per cent betting tax, power to raise business tax.
  • April 12 – Robert Firth, 85, who discovered goldeye curing process, died.
  • April 13 – Typhoid carrier found, St. Boniface epidemic reported checked.
  • April 18 – Youth fatally injured; Winnipeg’s fatality-free run of 118 days ended.
  • April 19 – Temperature 63 degrees. – Dr. F. W. Clark, 46 years a teacher of classics at Manitoba College, U. of M,. died.

MAY

  • May 3 – All-time record set as $42,750 donated to Winnipeg Community Chest.
  • May 8 – PO David Willis, St. Boniface, awarded DFC.
  • May 9 – Mrs. Frances Harrop sentenced to hang for murder of her husband April 16.
  • May 15 – University of Manitoba graduates 353.
  • May 16 – Dr. W. Harvey Smith, Manitoba medical leader, died.
  • May 18 – Wheat future prices pegged at 70¼ cents for May wheat futures.
  • May 29 – Canadian Manufacturers’ Association held annual convention in Winnipeg.
  • May 30 – 112th Squadron reported safe arrival in Britain.

JUNE

  • June 11 – Civic Election Committee urged ban on public office-holding by persons in organizations declared illegal by federal government.
  • June 13 – Ald. Jacob Penner, Communist, arrested under Defence of Canada regulations.
  • June 19 – Military District 10 announced start of recruiting for two companies of infantry reserve from ranks of military veterans.
  • June 22 – Air Observers School announced for Stevenson Field.
  • June 25 – W. H. Carter named president of Winnipeg Electric Co.
  • June 26 – Work started on $500,000 aircraft assembly plant in Winnipeg.

JULY

  • July 1 – Dr. A. J. Douglas, long-time Winnipeg health officer died.
  • July 15 – Manitoba points reported biggest weekend for marriages ever recorded.
  • July 16 – $40,000 in War Savings Stamps bought by movie patrons at box offices.
  • July 19 – Lady Macdonald, widow of Sir Hugh John Macdonald, died.
  • July 25 – Thermometer registered 100 degrees. – Winnipeg city council asked Ottawa to disqualify from public office members of organizations declared illegal under Defence of Canada regulations.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 1 – Brig. H. J. Riley assumed command of Military District No. 10.
  • Aug. 7 – Winnipeg city solicitor Jules Prud’homme said Ald. J. Penner (arrested June 13) cannot be debarred from office.
  • Aug. 9 – Manitoba Department of Education ordered compulsory patriotic exercises in all schools. – Lord Strathcona Horse (RC) regiment completely mechanized, lost horses.
  • Aug. 10 – Premier Bracken called conference of western premiers on wheat problems.
  • Aug. 12 – H. V. Fanshaw, artist and teacher, died. – W. G. (Billy) Code, pioneer fireman, died. – First shipment of 4,000 lbs. of Manitoba salmon from Hudson Bay arrived in Winnipeg.
  • Aug. 16 – Western premiers’ grain conference urged bank loans on security of farm-stored grain.
  • Aug. 19 – Citizens turned out in large numbers for national registration. – Gracie Fields gave concert in Winnipeg.
  • Aug. 28 – Arthur Land, greenskeeper at St. Charles Country Club, won Manitoba Open golf title.
  • Aug. 30 = School for Deaf, Tuxedo, turned over to Department of National Defence for wireless training school.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 5 – Cadet training in Winnipeg schools ordered.
  • Sept. 6 – Greater Winnipeg Youth Council quit Canadian Youth Congress in protest against CYC’s anti-war policy.
  • Sept. 16 – United Church general council urged abolition of beer taverns, special tax on beverage alcohol.
  • Sept. 18 – Two airmen killed when training plane crashed near Balmoral.
  • Sept. 20 – Military training announced for all male university students.
  • Sept. 23 – Dr. A. B. Baird, 85, western church leader died.

OCTOBER

  • Inquiry into Winnipeg police department found no grounds for aldermanic complaints and criticized those requesting probe.
  • Oct. 2 – Manitoba Sugar Co. factory opened. First bag produced sodl for $2,000 and money donated to Red Cross.
  • Oct. 15 – Two men sentenced to 20 years imprisonment as accessories in Const. McDonald killing.
  • Oct. 18 – Cordite plant to cost $9,000,000 announced for site east of Winnipeg.
  • Oct. 19 – Appeal court declared Mrs. Frances Harrop not guilty of murder of husband on grounds of insanity.
  • Oct. 23 – Madeleine Carroll, Preston Foster, other movie stars in Winnipeg for premier of film “North West Mounted Police.”
  • Oct. 28 – J. S. Woodsworth, MP for North Centre Winnipeg, resigned as leader of CCF due to ill-health.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 1 – R.F. McWilliams KC, sworn in as lieutenant-governor.
  • Nov. 5 – George McLean re-elected mayor of St. Boniface by acclamation.
  • Nov. 8 – John Queen re-elected mayor of Winnipeg by acclamation.
  • Nov. 9 – Salome Haldorson, MLA for St. George, quit Social Credit group in Legislature as protest against coalition.
  • Nov. 12 – Heavy snowfall tied up traffic in southern Manitoba.
  • Nov. 22 – Light vote registered in municipal elections. Ald. M. J. Forkin, Mrs. J. Penner, Communist candidates, defeated.
  • Nov. 27 – Manitoba Social Credit League disowns four MLAs who joined coalition government.
  • Nov. 28 – Provincial Treasurer S. S. Garson estimates 1941 spending will be more than $15,900,000.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 5 – Charles F. Gray, former mayor of Winnipeg, appointed director of war savings for Manitoba.
  • Dec. 7 – Conservative MLA Gen. H. D. B. Ketchen charged provincial coalition government had blacked out information.
  • Dec. 15 – Christmas trade reported higher than previous year by 10 to 20 per cent.
  • Dec. 16 – One person died, one injured in Kennedy Street rooming house fire.
  • Dec. 20 – Gunman got $380 in payroll robbery.
  • Dec. 22 – Armed holdup man got $370.
  • Dec. 23 – Business men’s carnival raised $6,000 for Council of Social Agencies.
  • Dec. 24 – Armed holdup man got $1,000.
  • Dec. 25 – Two persons killed in traffic accident.
  • Dec. 31 – W. R. Clubb, former public works minister, appointed liquor commissioner. – Drug addicts blamed for drug store holdup.

c-4

Fall of Hong Kong was costly to Manitoba

1941-43

1941

JANUARY

  • Jan. 4 –Manitoba firms had received war contracts worth $17,000,000.
  • Jan. 11 – Lyric Theatre, Minnedosa, burned.
  • Jan. 15 – Dominion-provincial conference on report of Rowell-Sirois commission broke down in Ottawa.
  • Jan. 21 – Wartime Prices and Trade Board restricted restaurant butter servings to half ounce per customer.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 1 – Premier John Bracken’s home burgled, clothes stolen. Clothes later returned included coat not Bracken’s.
  • Feb. 8 – Independent Labor Party celebrated 20th anniversary.
  • Feb. 22 – Bread war in Winnipeg cut price to four cents a loaf.

MARCH

  • Mar. 1 – Four arrested under wartime defence regulations included J. McNeil, one-time Communist aldermanic candidate.
  • Mar. 8 – Indian relics once belonging to Paul Kane turned over to museum.
  • Mar. 14 – Hon. W. J. Major appointed to court of King’s Bench.
  • Mar. 28 – 700 northern Manitoba sleigh dogs dead in distemper outbreak.

APRIL

  • Apr. 12 – Many complaints, much investigation of nails on Legislature Building driveways, until discovery made pigeons to blame.
  • Apr. 23 – After dull campaign, coalition government returned in provincial election, with 50 seats out of 55.
  • Apr. 28 – New Air Observer School at Portage la Prairie opened.

MAY

  • May 1 – Winnipeg Rangers won national junior hockey title. – Long-time drought area, Pierson in southwest of Manitoba, reported 3.24 ins. of rain in 24 hours.
  • May 16 – All Royal Air Force men graduated at second wings parade, Carberry flying school.

JUNE

  • June 5 – Winnipeg had trial blackout.
  • June 11 – Winnipeg second-hand dealer found brand new store was bad for his type of business, asked for lower business tax.
  • June 13 – Tourist and Convention Bureau closed doors after 16 years, province took over major functions.
  • June 19 – Neepawa battered by cyclone with winds over 60 miles per hour.
  • June 30 – Province dropped two per cent wage tax.

JULY

  • July 9 – Prime Minister King inspected Brandon Army units.
  • July 13 – New rural recruiting scheme introduced.
  • July 22 – Health authorities reported 81 cases of polio in province. – Service station men reported appeal to use less gasoline having no effect on sales.
  • July 31 – Wheat processing tax repealed.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 4 – Duke of Kent visited Winnipeg.
  • Aug. 9 – Pine Falls halted all incoming traffic as provincial polio epidemic spread. – 379 cases, 136 in Winnipeg.
  • Aug. 16 – Sleeping sickness epidemic spreading with 149 cases, deaths. Polio cases numbered 597.
  • Aug. 25 – Deliveries of gasoline to retailers cut.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 4 – Sleeping sickness cases reported at 409.
  • Sept. 5 – Rationing of some commodities forecast.
  • Sept. 9 – Manitoba Bridge and Iron Works received $5,000,000 contract for guns.
  • Sept. 10 – Sale of anti-freeze (glycol) frozen by Ottawa.
  • Sept. 11 – Polio cases listed as 800.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 27 – First battalion Winnipeg Grenadiers departed for Hong Kong.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 10 – Nathaniel K. Boyd, MP for Marquette, Macdonald and Portage la Prairie 1882- 1905, died at 88.
  • Nov. 13 – Rt. Hon. Arthur Meighen, Portage la Prairie, again chosen as Conservative leader.
  • Nov. 20 – Blizzard blocked roads in Brandon, Dauphin areas.
  • Nov. 29 – Winnipeg Blue Bombers won Grey Cup, defeating Ottawa 18-16.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 4 – U.K. entertainer Gracie Fields in Winnipeg.
  • Dec. 7 – Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, U.S.A. in war.
  • Dec. 11 – All tire sales banned.
  • Dec. 26 – Fall of Hong Kong announced, hundreds of Manitoba soldiers casualties, prisoners.

c-74

1942

JANUARY

  • Jan. 1 – Ottawa announced Winnipeg Grenadiers to be reconstituted.
  • Jan. 2 – D. G. McKenzie appointed chairman of Board of Grain Commissioners. – W. J. Lindal, KC, appointed district judge at Minnedosa.
  • Jan. 12 – Jane Whyte, Winnipeg, first Manitoba woman to join WRNS.
  • Jan. 19 – Golfers out on Norwood course in 35 above temperature.
  • Jan. 20 – Lady Nanton, widow of Sir. Augustus Nanton, died.
  • Jan. 26 – Dr. J. A. Munn, MLA, died at Carman.
  • Jan. 31 – Mary Rose Thacker, Winnipeg, won Canadian figure skating championship.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 4 – Winnipeg divided into 11 districts for civil defence.
  • Feb. 7 – Joseph Haig, 90, Manitoba pioneer and veteran curler, died.
  • Feb. 9 – Manitoba went on Daylight Saving Time.
  • Feb. 18 – Ken Watson won Manitoba curling title.
  • Feb. 19 – “Nazis” invaded Winnipeg on ‘If’ Day.
  • Feb. 20 – Three persons died in North End fire.
  • Feb. 27 – Provincial Treasurer S. S. Garson, tabled provincial estimates of $17,999,000. – River Park, amusement centre in Winnipeg, closed.

MARCH

  • Mar. 3 – Manitoba exceeded $45,000,000 Victory Loan quota.
  • Mar. 4 – Three holdups this day brought two-week total of armed robberies to ten.
  • Mar. 7 – Manitoba Victory Loan sales topped $60,000,000.
  • Mar. 16 – Retail sale of coffee cream discontinued for the duration.
  • Mar. 17 – Winnipeg took entire Hydro surplus, $265,000, in attempt to balance budget.
  • Mar. 25 – Five hundred Japanese families scheduled to come to Manitoba to help with sugar beet harvest.
  • Mar. 26 – Worst snow storm in 25 years blanketed province. – Dr. H. M. Speechly, 75, provincial coroner since 1929, announced his retirement.

APRIL

  • April 3 – 100 homes isolated as Seine River broke banks.
  • April 16 – Province cut relief grant to Winnipeg by $144,000.
  • April 17 – Severe shortage of beef reported.
  • April 19 – Former Ford Co. plant in Winnipeg taken over for technical training school.
  • April 25 – The Governor-General, the Earl of Athlone toured Manitoba war industries.

MAY

  • May 1 – Army announced Lt. Col. J. L. R. Sutcliffe, commanding officer, Winnipeg Grenadiers at Hong Kong, had died in prisoner of war camp.
  • May 5 – Manitoba gasoline sales increased by 16,000 gallons per day, in spite of rationing.
  • May 11 – First Hong Kong prisoner-of-war list revealed fate of many Manitoba soldiers.
  • May 12 – University of Manitoba graduates numbered 484.
  • May 18 – Archbishop S. P. Matheson, former primate of Canada for Anglican Church died.
  • May 25 – Dominion convention of Canadian Legion passed resolution demanding conscription.

JUNE

  • June 3 – Dr. G. T. Mathers, provincial psychiatrist, resigned, replaced by Dr. G. M. Stephens.
  • June 5 – Price of beef rose by eight cents a pound.
  • June 10 – Winnipeg replaced vouchers with cash for unemployed. – City’s net debt was cut $2,000,000 in 1941.
  • June 13 – Four-man board of inquiry named to study Manitoba power systems.
  • June 16 – Mrs. Jessie McLennan, first woman chairman of Winnipeg School Board, died.
  • June 18 – Greater Winnipeg Co-ordinating Council formed to look after welfare of servicemen’s families.
  • June 25 – Sugar rationing started.
  • June 27 – Man, woman killed in light plane crash at Winnipeg airport.

JULY

  • July 7 – Tenders called for construction of air training base at Gimli.
  • July 8 – Farm cash income in Manitoba was up $6,000,000 over 1941 in first quarter figures.
  • July 12 – Egg-sized hail, 65 miles per hour wind damages crops.
  • July 12 – $250,000 fire destroyed several buildings at Winnipeg Beach. – Province, municipalities reached agreement to split relief cost equally.
  • July 16 – Walter Stovel, 77, early photo-engraver, died.
  • July 23 – Military District 10 announced start of recruiting of women for army.
  • July 24 – Gimli air base contract let for $1,113,000 to Bird Construction Co.
  • July 25 – Severe electrical storm followed by 2.34 inches of rain.
  • July 29 – Another 2.72 inches of rain did $1,000,000 damage.
  • July 31 – Health authorities warned against food stocks which might have been flood-damaged. – School reopening delay of two weeks ordered so students could help with harvest.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 1 – Mayor Queen asked for inquiry into flooding. – Businessmen threatened city with lawsuits.
  • Aug. 7 – Premier John Bracken celebrated 20th anniversary in office.
  • Aug. 12 – U.S. workers, Japanese, Indians, school students to number of 5,000 mobilized for harvest.
  • Aug. 13 – Dr. T. H. Cuddy, Winnipeg, elected national president of Native Sons of Canada.
  • Aug. 15 – 35 service stations padlocked for violation of oil regulations.
  • Aug. 24 – Trades and Labor Council of Canada held national convention in Winnipeg.
  • Aug. 27 – Harold Aikins, K. C., of Winnipeg, elected president of Canadian Bar Association.
  • Aug. 28 – Contract let to Claydon Co. for $1,000,000 expansion at Stevenson Field.
  • Aug. 31 – Manitoba families got letters from prisoners at Hong Kong.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. – D. B. Moorehead named principal of Manitoba Normal School. – Winnipeg agreed to pay its employees a cost-of-living bonus.
  • Sept. 9 – CPR’s No. 1 locomotive, Countess of Dufferin, moved from Sir William Whyte Park to front of CPR station, Higgins Ave.
  • Sept. 10 – Anglican Archbishop M.T. M. Harding announced his retirement.
  • Sept. 11 – Killarney district reported damage from cyclone.
  • Sept. 20 – Brig. A. R. Macfarlane appointed as head of Military District 10.
  • Sept. 25 – Boy, five, unhurt in 30-floor fall.
  • Sept. 30 – A. E. Parker re-elected as head of Patriotic Salvage Corps.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 1 – Jules Prud’homme, K.C., honored on retirement as city solicitor.
  • Oct. 5 – Jewel thieves got loot worth $5,000. – Ottawa was negotiating for Winnipeg Winter Club as naval training centre.
  • Oct. 6 – Dr. E. Cora Hind, agricultural expert and writer, died.
  • Oct. 14 – Winnipeg approved free treatment for tuberculosis cases.
  • Oct. 19 – Capt. W. Osler, former Tribune reporter and survivor of Dieppe raid, returned to Winnipeg on leave.
  • Oct. 24 – Harry Chappell elected provincial CCF chairman.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 2 – T. Eaton Co. annex converted into recreation centre for service personnel.
  • Nov. 3 – Street car collision in front of Hudson’s Bay Co. store, Winnipeg, injured 25. – Single Men’s Unemployment Relief Commission, set up in 1932, disbanded.
  • Nov. 4 – Manitoba exceeded quota on third Victory Loan.
  • Nov 20 – Winnipeg school salvage hunt turned up 20 tons of reclaimable rubber.
  • Nov. 27 – Garnet Coulter elected Mayor of Winnipeg.
  • Nov. 30 – Dan McLean, member of Winnipeg city council for 27 years, defeated on second count.
  • Stanley Knowles won Winnipeg North Centre by-election to fill seat vacated by J. S. Woodworth.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 4 – Apartment block fire in Winnipeg caused loss of $100,000.
  • Dec. 5 – Toronto RCAF football team defeated Winnipeg RCAF Bombers.
  • Dec. 9 – Conservative national leadership convention opened with seven in running for top position.
  • Dec. 10 – CCF provincial leader S. J. Farmer, resigned as minister of labor in coalition cabinet.
  • Dec. 11 – Premier John Bracken elected Conservative national leader.
  • Dec. 12 – Conservatives added “Progressive” to party name at Bracken’s insistence.
  • Dec. 14 – Coalition government continued in Manitoba, in spite of CCF withdrawal.
  • Dec. 19 – Errick F. Willis replaced Farmer as labor minister.
  • Dec. 20 – Lawrence F. B. Palk, Winnipeg Electric Co. executive died.
  • Dec. 30 – Marion Johnston, BA, became first woman inducted into pastoral charge when she assumed pulpit of Starbuck United Church. – Manitoba sugar yield for 1942 was up 4,500,000 lbs. to 27,500,000 lbs.

1943

JANUARY

  • Jan. 5 – 97 students who failed U exams reported for military service.
  • Jan. 6 – Official reports received on 131 members of Winnipeg Grenadiers who were either casualties or prisoners at Hong Kong.
  • Jan. 11 – At Portage la Prairie, 70 farmers met to protest against sale of land to conscientious objectors.
  • Jan. 14 – Hon. S. S. Garson became premier, John Bracken resigned his seat in the Legislature (The Pas).
  • Jan. 15 – Liquor ration cut to 40 oz. spirits, two cases beer and one gallon wine per week.
  • Jan. 17 – Fires at Selkirk and St. Lazare did $70,000 damage.
  • Jan. 21 – Egg powdering plants had problem with 30 tons of shells mounting up per day. City charged $4 per ton to burn them. “Price high, so is smell,” said Winnipeg official.
  • Jan. 28 – Revenue from auto licences down by $300,000.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 1 – Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Cantin, McCreary, had eight sons, one daughter serving in armed forces.
  • Feb. 2 – Old Age Pension increased by $1.25 per month.
  • Feb 8 – Sugar ration affected home brewmakers.
  • Feb. 11 – Rt. Rev. R. L. Sherman, Bishop of Calgary, elected Archbishop of Rupert’s Land.
  • Feb. 16 – Mr. Justice R. M. Denistoun of the Court of Appeal wrote in Manitoba Bar news that the province should do away with pomp and ceremony in courts.
  • Feb. 20 – Independent Labor Party dissolved, to become part of CCF.
  • Feb. 25 – Liquor ration cut again.

MARCH

  • Mar. 12 – Bitter row in Legislature over Conservative MLA D. A. Best’s resolution to forbid land sales to conscientious objectors, Hutterites, unnaturalized aliens and their descendants.
  • Mar. 15 – Worst blizzard since 1902 swept province, milk shipments halted, transportation tied up.
  • Mar. 22 – Province delayed redistribution of constituencies for one year.
  • Mar. 23 – Bicycle licences were made of fibre. – Wabowden dance netted $40 for Red Cross drive.
  • Mar. 27 – Beef prices increased one to four cents.
  • Mar. 31 – Daily column in Tribune on Victory Gardens. – Summerberry marsh closed for muskrat trapping for one year.

APRIL

  • Apr. 6 – Bill to recognize labor’s right to organize defeated.
  • Apr. 8 – Two men killed when Dauphin dry cleaning plant exploded.
  • Apr. 16 – Two youngsters kicking cans in Winnipeg back lane, found they contained $70, turned money over to police. Owner gave them 10 per cent reward.
  • Apr. 22 – 17,000 acres reported to be sown to sugar beets.
  • Apr. 28 – Winnipeg Rangers won Memorial Cup, defeating Oshawa Generals 6-3.

MAY

  • May 4 – First meatless Tuesday of war.
  • May 8 – Trainees at Shilo made first parachute jump.
  • May 18 – Meat rationing outlined, allowance per person being one to 2½ lbs., depending on bones.
  • May 26 – Reserve army held demonstration of tactics at Polo Park, Lord’s Day Alliance objected to occurrence on a Sunday.
  • May 27 – Meat rationing started. – Muskrat population of Fisher River area soared to 12 times previous year.

JUNE

  • June 3 – Manitoba conference of the United Church urged that government only should issue marriage licences.
  • June 10 – Judge F. A. E. Hamilton of juvenile court said juvenile delinquency was the worst in 20 years.
  • June 21 – Manitoba, Saskatchewan conferred on uniform school curriculum, text books.
  • June 22 – Coalition candidate won Killarney by-election, A. W. Harrison receiving 1,377 to 988 for R. M. Chapman, CCF.
  • June 26 – Manitoba section, Canadian Weekly Newspaper Association gave award to best all-round paper to the Minnedosa Tribune.

JULY

  • July 3 – Four Starbuck area men fined $200 each for having gasoline stolen from RCAF.
  • July 8 – Winnipeg Beach town council banned wearing of bathing suits on downtown streets.
  • July 14 – Bets on horse racing were at 14-year high – $3,194,000.
  • July 15 – Winnipeg Electric Co. sent out call for women drivers for trams.
  • July 17 – Practice bomb hit open air dance floor 10 miles south-west of Brandon, man killed, five hurt. Plane crew mistook dance floor lights for bombing range lights, 5 miles away.
  • July 19 – Seven persons were killed in train collision at Cranberry Portage.
  • July 26 – Cost of living up 15 percent since September, 1939.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 6 – 73 Indians from northern Lake Winnipeg arrived for harvest work.
  • Aug. 9 – Severe shortage of tram, bus seats forecast for winter time.
  • Aug. 10 – William Bryce, CCF, won federal by-election in Selkirk.
  • Aug. 18 – Berry Richards, CCF, won The Pas provincial by-election.
  • Aug. 23 – Honey, jams, jellies announced as next to be rationed, on Sept. 2.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 5 – Two men hurt, 2 cars cattle destroyed in head-on rail collision at Macdonald.
  • Sept. 7 – “Dambuster” WC Guy Gibson, VC, toured Manitoba.
  • Sept. 13 – W. B. Udall, Boissevain, elected vice-president of International Peace Garden, Inc.
  • Sept.24 – Mrs. C. P. Walker, widow of well-known Winnipeg theatre-owner, and an actress and writer herself, died at 78.
  • Sept. 27 – Printers on the two daily newspapers in Winnipeg returned to the International Typographical Union.
  • Sept. 28 – Futures trading suspended on Winnipeg grain Exchange. Wheat price pegged at $1.25.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 8 – Portage la Prairie turned out street lights in attempt to baffle huge clouds of insects from Delta.
  • Oct. 8 – Merchant charged with selling shaving cream without demanding an empty tube in exchange.
  • Oct. 13 – First weather broadcasts were heard on radio in two years.
  • Oct. 16 – Provincial officials announced the season’s squirrel harvest was 300,000 pelts, at 35 cents per pelt.
  • Oct. 26 – J. A. (Pat) Bennett shot trying to escape from penitentiary.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 18 – C. E. Greenlay, coalition, won Portage la Prairie; Dr. D. L. Johnson, CCF, took Brandon in provincial by-elections.
  • Nov. 24 – 35 “loafers” rounded up, put to work in Winnipeg. – Liberals announced party name changed to Liberal-Progressive.
  • Nov. 25 – Liquor ration again cut to 26 ounces spirits, 3 bottles wine and 24 bottles of beer per month, if it was available.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 1 – Bottle thrown through Government House window contained note blaming Lt-Gov. R. F. McWilliams for cutting beer ration.
  • Dec. 6 – Edith Cook, 16, found strangled in downtown Winnipeg hotel.
  • Dec. 14 – Albert V. Westgate charged with murder of Edith Cook.
  • Dec. 21 – Post Office set new record, handled 2,000,000 letters in one day.

c-75

People started planning for a peaceful world

1944-45

1944

JANUARY

  • Jan. 3 – Albert Westgate faced preliminary hearing in Edith Cook murder.
  • Jan. 6 – Manitoba Game and Fish Association worried over upland game birds’ disappearance.
  • Jan. 9 – J. W. Dafoe, Editor of Free Press, member of Rowell-Sirois economic inquiry, died at 78.
  • Jan. 11 – Westgate committed for trial at assizes.
  • Jan. 20 – Winnipeg housing shortage set at 9,000.
  • Jan. 27 – Federal Throne Speech forecast family allowances and old age pension increases.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 2 – Chemistry students touch off blast in St. Boniface home, none injured.
  • Feb. 3 – City council told by Dr. M. S. Lougheed, health officer, that there were still 284 outhouses in Winnipeg, 171 in Fort Rouge, and 25 more than in 1942.
  • Feb. 8 – Westgate pleaded “not guilty” at assize trial.

MARCH

  • Mar. 2 – Federal government proposed health insurance plan.
  • Mar. 13 – Half block of Winnipeg Beach business area burned.
  • Mar. 20 – Chief Justice E. A. McPherson, court of King’s Bench, named chief justice of Manitoba Appeal Court.

APRIL

  • Apr. 1 – Mayors of Fort William and Port Arthur urged Northwestern Ontario should join Manitoba.
  • Apr. 6 – Walter Fetterly, CPR engineer, saved life of Margaret Moffatt, 6, of Minnedosa, by stopping train, dragging her from Minnedosa River.
  • Apr. 28 – Fort Osborne food depot destroyed by fire.

MAY

  • May 9 – Westgate found guilty, sentenced to hang.
  • May 13 – Sidney E. Smith installed as president, University of Manitoba.
  • May 20 – Manitobans subscribed $102,000,000 in current Victory Loan.

JUNE

  • June 2 – Young Liberal Federation held national convention in Winnipeg.
  • June 6 – D-Day, Allies invaded France.
  • June 7 – Grocer fined $500 for possession of forged sugar coupons.

JULY

  • July 1 – Court of Appeal ruled that price ceiling for a man’s haircut was 35 cents.
  • July 12 – Orange Lodge parade was small, with no King William on white horse.
  • July 24 – Albert Westgate hanged.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 1 – Censor allowed announcement of development of huge airport at Churchill.
  • Aug. 7 – University of Manitoba announced establishment of school of music with Eva Clair as director.
  • Aug. 28 – One of first groups of War brides arrived from U.K.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 1 – Canadian forces captured Dieppe. – Three-day rain set a record for past 25 years, 4.21 inches.
  • Sept. 11 – Seventy one-room schools unable to open, no teachers available.
  • Sept. 19 – Tea, coffee rationing ended.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 3 – William Marsh, editor of Dauphin Herald, said his chief trouble was paper shortage, resulting in waiting list for new subscribers.
  • Oct. 17 – Four separate surveys showed filling Winnipeg’s housing needs would be a 10-year project.
  • Oct. 24 – Winnipeg received proposal for $1,500,000 medical centre bounded by William, Bannatyne, Notre Dame.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 7 – Dr. F. W. Jackson, deputy minister of health, charged that rural hospitals were small, overcrowded.
  • Nov. 9 – Bill prepared for Legislature to indemnify victims of auto accidents.
  • Nov. 13 – St. Matthew’s Church, Winnipeg, burned.
  • Nov. 17 – Overcrowding among muskrats in Netley Marsh brings provincial order to thin them out.
  • Nov. 24 – Eight Manitoba towns, including Eden, Laurier, Ste. Rose du Lac and Ochre River, got reduction in Hydro rates.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 2 – Province guaranteed $40,000 bonds of oilseed plant at Altona.
  • Dec. 7 – Nine Manitobans missing when HMCS Shawinigan sunk in Atlantic.
  • Dec. 14 – Three school inspectors – A. A. Herriot, E. D. Parker, J. E. S. Dunlop had 100 years of inspectoral experience between them.

1945

JANUARY

  • Jan. 18 – Premier Garson urged speedup in rural elections.
  • Jan. 24 – J. A. Cuddy, Sanford, re-elected president of Manitoba School Trustees Association.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 3 – Dr. R. M. Simpson, 80, former provincial health officer and only surviving member of U of M medical school class of 1887, died.
  • Feb. 6 – “Bold” social legislation forecast in Manitoba Throne Speech.
  • Feb. 10 – Provincial treasurer announced one-fifth of Manitoba revenue derived from liquor sales.
  • Feb. 17 – Premier Garson announced that $3,000,000 in aircraft orders had been diverted to Manitoba firms from Ontario.
  • Feb. 27 – School burned at Lac du Bonnet.

MARCH

  • Mar. 2 – MLAs Barry Richards, D. L. Johnson, in trouble with provincial CCF organization.
  • Mar. 16 – Tax on horse race bets doubled.
  • Mar. 24 – Two Winnipeg firemen died in Princess St. warehouse fire.
  • Marc. 31 – Blue Bomber star Jeff Nicklin killed on active service.

APRIL

  • Apr. 4 – University students came out in favor of Broadway site for U.
  • Apr. 12 – President Roosevelt of U.S.A. died.
  • Apr. 18 – Ex-chief Justice J. E. P. Prendergast, chief justice of Manitoba since 1929, died at 87.

MAY

  • May 3 – Harry Leader, Portage la Prairie MP for 14 years, retired on account of ill-health.
  • May 7 – Germany surrendered – VE Day.
  • May 11 – Five wartime taxes repealed.
  • May 29 – Western Manitoba centres urged all weather highway from Minot, N.D. to The Pas.

JUNE

  • June 2 – Former mayor and MLA for Winnipeg, Ralph H. Webb died. – A. W. Trueman appointed president, University of Manitoba.
  • June 12 – Federal election, Liberals returned to office; Manitoba constituencies elected 10 Liberals, two Progressive Conservatives, five CCF.
  • June 16 – RAF plane landed at Rivers after record 3,900-mile flight from Prestwick, Scotland.
  • June 29 – Dr. R. O. MacFarlane appointed provincial superintendent of education.

JULY

  • July 2 – Hotel at Red Lake burned, 9 died, 20 injured.
  • July 16 – 76,000 family allowance cheques ready for first distribution.
  • July 21 – U of M officials reported veterans doing well at studies.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 6 – Atomic bomb dropped at Hiroshima.
  • Aug. 13 – Four Manitobans named as having worked on atomic development, L. Yaffe, S. C. Fultz, S. Epstein, H. V. C. Duckworth, now vice-president U of M.
  • Aug. 27 – Commercial fishing on Lake Winnipeg approved and new hatcheries planned.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 2 –Japan surrendered to Allies.
  • Sept. 17 – First member of Winnipeg Grenadiers back in Winnipeg.
  • Sept 22 – Attorney-general J. O. McLenaghen warned of lottery ban.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 3 – Trades and Labor Council refused to support CCF candidates.
  • Oct. 13 – Federal income tax cut 16 per cent.
  • Oct. 15 – Coalition government returned in provincial election, with government winning 43 seats, opposition 11 (8 CCF).

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 8 – International Typographical Union members on strike at two Winnipeg newspapers. Papers published joint editions.
  • Nov. 10 – Heavy snowfall over southern province.
  • Nov. 17 – Shortage of conductors, wiring delayed rural electrification program.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 3 – Shipment completed of 5,000 quarts nitro glycerine from Transcona plant to Calgary.
  • Dec. 11 – Liquor rations increased to three bottles per month, but only one to be Scotch.
  • Dec. 31 – Royal Winnipeg Rifles returned home from overseas.

c-75

Manitoba ‘cavalry’ units return from European theatre

1946

  • Jan. 5 – Roy McGregor, 13, found murdered near his home in Winnipeg.
  • Jan. 7 – $1,000 reward offered in McGregor case.
  • Jan. 11 – General Hospital, Winnipeg, announced a $1,200,000 expansion plan.
  • Jan. 14 – Loss of $100,000 estimated when Odd fellows Temple on Kennedy St. burned.
  • Jan. 16 – Main St. and Logan Ave. branch of Royal Bank burned.
  • Jan. 18 – Manitoba units, Fort Garry Horse, 12th Manitoba Dragoons, Lord Strathcona’s Horse returned from overseas and were greeted by a crowd of 4,500.
  • Jan. 24 – Orpheum Theatre in Winnipeg sold to a local syndicate.
  • Jan. 29 – Armed bandit wounded during attempted drug store holdup.
  • Feb. 1 – Winnipeg School Board’s budget of $4,475,000 set a new record.
  • Feb. 4 – Manitoba Bonspiel received 396 entries, highest number ever.
  • Feb. 5 – Slight rain reported from many points in province.
  • Feb. 6 – Petition asked clemency for Baldwin Jonasson, sentenced to hang for murder of Portage la Prairie girl.
  • Feb. 8 – Baldwin Jonasson hanged.
  • Feb. 11 – Heavy snowdrifts blocked many Manitoba Roads.
  • Feb. 12 – Winnipeg city council approved construction of 10,000 rent-subsidized homes.
  • Feb. 14 – C. Rhodes Smith, Winnipeg and C. E. Greenlay of Portage la Prairie joined provincial cabinet.
  • Feb. 15 – Leo Johnson became Manitoba’s representative in Dominion curling finals.
  • Feb. 19 – 20,000 people jammed Winnipeg department stores for first sale of nylon stockings.
  • Feb. 21 – Provincial surplus estimated at largest ever, $3,214,000.
  • Mar. 4 – Court–martial opened in Winnipeg of Company Sergeant Major C. Tugby, of the British Army, charged with collaboration with the Japanese in wartime prison camp.
  • Mar. 6 – Joseph Mytofir, 73, murdered.
  • Mar. 11 – Winnipeg Monarchs defeated Brandon Elks 6-3 for junior provincial hockey title.
  • Mar. 13 – Widespread rain recorded at .02 inches.
  • Mar. 14 – John H. Harvey acquitted by court-martial on charges of collaboration with Japanese during war.
  • Mar. 15 – Winnipeg Light Infantry designated as the first reserve paratroop regiment.
  • Apr. 1 – Mrs. H. N. Knight charged with murder of her husband. – Taxi driver Johann Johnson murdered.
  • Apr. 2 – Company Sergeant Major John R. Osborn of St. Vital, Winnipeg Grenadiers, awarded posthumous Victoria Cross for valor at Hong Kong.
  • Apr. 5 – Winnipeg Monarchs won Western Canada junior hockey title.
  • Apr. 6 – Provincial government announced Fort Garry as permanent site of University of Manitoba and buildings on Broadway to be demolished.
  • Apr. 11 – Man and woman arrested for Johnson murder.
  • Apr. 16 – Women’s jail at Portage la Prairie was scene of riot. – Murder charge laid against Lawrence Deacon in Johnson murder.
  • Apr. 27 – Royal Winnipeg Rifles arrived home as a unit.
  • Apr. 29 – Winnipeg Monarchs defeated St. Michael’s 4-2 to win Dominion Junior hockey crown.
  • Apr. 30 – E. H. Macklin, former president and general manager of Winnipeg Free Press, died.
  • May 1 – $1,000,000 fire swept Leeder Manufacturing Co.
  • May 7 – Winnipeg went on daylight saving time for five months.
  • May 8 – Winnipeg city council made offer of $47,000,000 for Winnipeg Electric. Co.
  • May 10 – University of Manitoba graduated 600 students. – Harry Leader, member of the House of Commons for Portage la Prairie, died.
  • May 15 – Mrs. H. N. Knight acquitted of murder charge.
  • May 21 – Province announced highway projects to cost $2,500,000.
  • May 30 – Keystone Fisheries Ltd. fined $12,000 for defrauding federal government.
  • June 4 – Thieves broke into University of Manitoba, stole $40,000.
  • June 8 – Two prisoners escaped Stony Mountain penitentiary, were recaptured within eight hours.
  • June 10 – Winnipeg approved construction of 300 Wartime Homes.
  • June 11 – Ald. James Simpkin, member of Winnipeg city council for 23 years, died.
  • June 19 – Mrs. E. M. McLean charged with killing of Claude F. Salisbury.
  • June 24 – Mrs. Inez Lungren charged with murder in death of Joseph L. O’Connell.
  • June 27 – RCMP rounded up three gangs of car thieves.
  • June 29 – Liquor profits reported by province totalled $5,000,000 for previous 12-month period. – CSM Tugby got severe reprimand from court-martial.
  • July 4 – Field Marshall Viscount Alexander, Governor-General of Canada, visited Manitoba.
  • July 6 – Winnipeg doctors were baffled by strange disease which was fatal to infants.
  • July 10 – Manitoba accepted Ottawa offer of new tax arrangement. – Lightning disrupted power supply in many parts of province.
  • July 13 – Provincial Normal School reported 550 had enrolled for teacher training.
  • July 15 – Former Winnipeg mayor, MLA and labor leader, John Queen, died.
  • July 22 – Arthur Stewart, Gladstone district, charged with murder of Alex Brazil.
  • July 23 – Long queues appeared at stores, bakeries as Winnipeg bread shortage ran to 40,000 loaves daily.
  • July 26 – Unidentified man jumped from Provencher Bridge to rescue 16-month-old infant from river. – Air service opened between Winnipeg and Red Lake, Ont.
  • Aug. 1 – Traffic death ended Winnipeg’s 90-day fatality-free period.
  • Aug. 7 – Steady rain ended fear of drought.
  • Aug. 13 – City high schools reported facing serious shortage of teachers.
  • Aug. 14 – Federal government approved $3,000,000 expansion plan for Stevenson Field airport.
  • Aug. 20 – Winnipeg Electric Co. packing house workers voted in favor of strike action.
  • Aug. 23 – Winnipeg was host city to meeting of 3,000 Shriners.
  • Aug. 31 – Winnipeg Community Chest set $485,000 as its target.
  • Sept. 2 – Field Marshal Montgomery, Archbishop of Canterbury visited Winnipeg.
  • Sept. 5 – Work started on Stevenson Field expansion.
  • Sept. 11 – 400 ration books were stolen in St. Vital.
  • Sept. 19 – George Smith, 13, found murdered near his home. Police linked case with that of Roy McGregor.
  • Sept. 20 – $2,000 reward offered in Smith murder.
  • Sept. 24 – City increased reward in Smith murder by $5,000.
  • Sept. 25 – Two men arrested when police seized $50,000 cache of narcotics.
  • Sept. 28 – Electricity rates cut for 200 Manitoba towns.
  • Oct. 1 – Milk price in Winnipeg rose to 14 cents a quart.
  • Oct. 7 – United College celebrated its 75th anniversary.
  • Oct. 8 – Winnipeg Electric Co. announced $4,000,000 expansion plan.
  • Oct. 9 – Constant Borg murdered. J. A. Morrison committed suicide by jumping into city incinerator.
  • Oct. 11 – Pilot Officer Andrew Mynarski, RCAF, posthumously awarded Victoria Cross for valor during wartime air raid over Germany.
  • Oct. 14 – St. Boniface Hospital celebrated 7th anniversary.
  • Oct. 17 – Record flow of cattle to market reported.
  • Oct. 18 – Winnipeg police arrested “bobby-sox” gang for mail-box thefts of family allowance cheques.
  • Oct. 19 – Mrs. Maude McLean sentenced to death for murder of Claude Salisbury.
  • Oct. 22 – Conservatives gain seat in Portage la Prairie by-election. – Mr. Justice H. A. Bergman resigned from University of Manitoba Board.
  • Oct. 31 – Herbert Cottingham retired as chairman of Manitoba Power Commission.
  • Nov. 1 – Hallowe’en damage, rowdyism in Winnipeg was worst in 10 years.
  • Nov. 4 – Lawrence Deacon sentenced to hang for murder of Johann Johnson. – Brothers-in-law charged with murder of David Gentles.
  • Nov. 5 – Mr. Justice Robert Denniston retired at 82 from Manitoba Court of Appeal. – George McLean re-elected mayor of St. Boniface.
  • Nov. 7 – Telesphore St. Cyr acquitted of murder of his uncle, Modest St. Cyr.
  • Nov. 11 – Manitoba announced intention to levy 5 per cent corporation tax, collectable by Ottawa.
  • Nov. 14 – Arthur Stewart acquitted in Brazil murder case.
  • Nov. 15 – 350 Polish veterans arrived to take farm jobs.
  • Nov. 23 – Garnet Coulter re-elected mayor of Winnipeg by 39,000 majority.
  • Nov. 26 – Grace Church, in centre of Winnipeg, up for sale.
  • Dec. 2 – Manitoba Medical College halted enrolments.
  • Dec. 4 – Christmas buying exceeded 1945 record.
  • Dec. 9 – Arson suspected in Federal Grain Co. fire in St. Boniface. Damage was $650,000.
  • Dec. 10 – Juvenile Court Judge F. A. E. Hamilton retired after 21 years on bench.
  • Dec. 11 – United College announced $1,500,000 building plan.
  • Dec. 12 – Lieutenant-Governor R. F. McWilliams presented Victoria Cross to Mrs. Mynarski.
  • Dec. 16 – Dr. Daniel McIntyre, former superintendent of Winnipeg schools died.
  • Dec. 23 – Winnipeg Hydro declared a surplus of $1,000,000.
  • Dec. 30 – Pioneer minister, Rev. David Iverach, 75 died, after service in Springfield, Rossburn, Griswold, Clanwilliam and Mather.

c-77

Strikes, murders and rising prices

1947-48

1947

JANUARY

  • Jan. 2 – Building permits issued by Winnipeg in 1946 set 34-year record.
  • Jan. 9 – Lawrence Deacon, sentenced to hang Jan. 16 for murder of Johan Johnson, won reprieve.
  • Jan. 25 – Premier Garson announced new tax agreement with Ottawa would give Manitoba a minimum payment of $13,500,000.
  • Jan. 27 – Heavy snowfall resulted in two deaths, four injuries.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 3 – Another big storm swept Red River Valley.
  • Feb. 17 – Lawrence Deacon got three-month stay of execution.
  • Feb. 19 – Ken Watson racked up sixth consecutive victory in Manitoba curling aggregate.
  • Feb. 21 – Jimmy Welsh defeated Ken Watson in Manitoba Brier competition.

MARCH

  • Mar. 6 – Welsh won Canadian curling title.
  • Mar. 12 – Reo Flyers captured Manitoba senior hockey title.
  • Mar. 22 – University of Manitoba won Canadian debating championship.

APRIL

  • Apr. 6 – Price of chocolate bars went up to 8 cents.
  • Apr. 13 – Assiniboine River ice dynamited to avert floods

MAY

  • May 1 – Ten guards injured in Stony Mountain penitentiary riot.
  • May 10 – Winnipeg milkman Frank Forlich saved 17 people from burning home.
  • May 18 – Old age pensions increased by $5 per months.

JUNE

  • June 3 – Mrs. M. Boroskae, Winnipeg, gave birth to triplets.
  • June 10 – New trial ordered for Lawrence Deacon.
  • June 27 – S. J. Farmer retired as provincial leader of CCF.

JULY

  • July 9 – Farmers building dykes along Assiniboine valley as water rose.
  • July 28 – Heat wave wilted crops in south of province.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 1 – Governor-general and Lady Alexander visited Winnipeg.
  • Aug. 8 – Michael Angelo Vescia charged with murder of Smith, MacGregor boys.
  • Aug. 14 – 2,500 Shriners ‘invaded’ city.
  • Aug. 22 – Temperature up to 98 degrees.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 2 – Campers’ train hit freight at Dugald, 31 killed.
  • Sept. 6 – Almost 100 bakery employees on strike.
  • Sept. 17 – Bread price in Winnipeg increased by 2 cents.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 2 – Five paratroopers went to Moffett Inlet in Arctic to rescue injured missionary Canon John Turner.
  • Oct. 6 – Mrs. Frances Tasker murdered.
  • Oct. 29 – Deacon jury-man ill, third trial ordered.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 4 – Deacon found guilty, to hang January 21, 1948.
  • Nov. 17 – Blue Bombers defeated Calgary to win western football title.
  • Nov. 25 – Vescio found guilty.
  • Nov. 29 – 12 rural schools closed for want of teachers.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 1 – Cigarette price up 2 cents. -Argos defeated Bombers for Grey Cup.
  • Dec. 9 – Canon Turner died.
  • Dec. 16 – Former lieutenant-governor W. J. Tupper died.

c-77

1948

JANUARY

  • Jan. 1 – Winnipeg milk price increased cent a quart.
  • Jan. 2 – 22,240 sought jobs, employment offices listed 5,000 vacancies. – Gasoline, fuel prices increased two cents a gallon.
  • Jan. 5 – Clarence Richardson charged with murder of Ann Varty.
  • Jan. 6 – Meat prices increased two cents.
  • Jan. 10 – Consumer resistance cut meat sales 20 to 25 per cent.
  • Jan. 14 – Central heating rate rose 10 per cent.
  • Jan. 17 – 71 cent ceiling set for butter price in Manitoba.
  • Jan. 20 – Frank Ferraro charged with murder of Hugh Scott. – Mr. Justice H. A. Bergman died.
  • Jan. 28 – Government decides Highway 75 to be located on west side of Red River.
  • Jan. 31 – Reliance Grain Co. elevators bought for $3,750,000 by United Grain Growers, Manitoba Pool Elevators. – Mr. Justice J. E. Adamson appointed to Manitoba Court of Appeal; J. T. Beaubien to Court of King’s Bench.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 7 – Sperling garageman killed one bandit, captured another.
  • Feb. 13 – Premier Garson announced provincial surplus of $4,000,000.
  • Feb. 19 – Worst blizzard of winter plugged Manitoba roads.
  • Feb. 21 – Winnipeg Electric Co. asked street car fare increase. – Ferraro acquitted on murder charge.
  • Feb. 23 – Drunken man killed wife in Misericordia Hospital, committed suicide. – Winnipeg passed 100th fatality-free day in drive for traffic safety.
  • Feb. 24 – Winnipeg repealed 1881 bylaw which granted CPR freedom from city taxes in perpetuity.
  • Feb. 27 – Legislature decided to investigate Highway 75 decision.

MARCH

  • Mar. 2 – Provincial estimates anticipated spending of $33,679,000.
  • Mar. 6 – Two children died in Oakville farm fire.
  • Mar. 12 – Legislature debated Winnipeg CPR tax decision.
  • Mar. 13 – Lawrence Deacon’s appeal on death sentence rejected.
  • Mar. 17 – Gasoline price increased half cent.
  • Mar. 27 – RCAF rescue of Canon John Turner from Arctic Bay was successful.
  • Mar. 30 – Hogg Report recommended further hydro development in province should be by public ownership.
  • Mar. 31 – Vescio appeal against death sentence opened.

APRIL

  • Apr. 1 – World champion skater Barbara Ann Scott appeared in Brandon.
  • Apr. 3 – Winnipeg Monarchs midgets won Manitoba midget hockey title.
  • Apr. 6 – Premier Garson called seven-province conference to fight proposed 21 per cent freight rate increase. – Province’s highway program to cost $5,579,000.
  • Apr. 16 – Lawrence Deacon hanged for murder of J. Johnson.
  • Apr. 17 – CNR paid city taken $310,000 in lieu of taxes.
  • Apr. 19 – Worst floods since 1887 forecast.
  • Apr. 22 – Emergency flood committee set up; Red River rose at rate of inch an hour; highways cut.
  • Apr. 23 – Emerson, Letellier, Morris asked flood aid.
  • Apr. 26 – Flood toll two dead, $1,000,000 damage.
  • Apr. 29 – Vescio asked leave to appeal to Supreme Court.

MAY

  • May 1 – Governor-General Viscount Alexander visited Manitoba. – Assiniboine River flood peak hit Brandon.
  • May 4 – Dr. A. W. McCurdy retired as publisher of The Tribune, succeeded by A. W. Moscarella.
  • May 7 – 812 Winnipeg homes damaged by flood.
  • May 10 – Two youths killed in Steinbach plane crash.
  • May 12 – 15,000 Manitoba veterans got war pension increase.
  • May 15 – Hundreds of acres flooded at Portage la Prairie. – A. H. S. Gillson appointed president of University of Manitoba.
  • May 17 – Temperature reached 94.8 degrees.
  • May 22 – Saskatchewan River flood wrecked veterans’ settlement at The Pas, 60 families destitute.
  • May 25 – 200 men fighting forest fires in Manitoba.
  • May 31 – Edgar Frenette, St. Boniface hotel keeper, murdered.

JUNE

  • June 1 – Clarence Richardson sentenced to death for murder of Ann Varty.
  • June 2 – Two youths charged in Frenette murder.
  • June 3 – Winnipeg Electric Co. agreed to pay employees 11 per cent increase, asked increase in fares.
  • June 7 – Near-hurricane did heavy damage to Portage la Prairie district crops.
  • June 9 – Federal government expropriated city block for new Winnipeg post office. – Vocational training approved for Brandon jail.
  • June 17 – Winnipeg, other municipalities offered new financial aid by province.
  • June 23 – Group of Manitoba Mennonites left for new colony in Paraguay. – Consumer pressure resulted in break in beef prices.

JULY

  • July 1 – Record crowds attending opening of Morris Fair.
  • July 3 – 15 injured when transcontinental freight trains collided at Rivers.
  • July 13 – Province announced it would proceed with Hogg recommendation for hydro takeover.
  • July 15 – Ottawa announced TCA operational base would remain in Winnipeg.
  • July 19 – Four drowned when car ran off Red River ferry.
  • July 21 – Cement shortage slowed Winnipeg paving program.
  • July 23 – Plans approved for $1,632,000 vocational school in Winnipeg.
  • July 26 – Winnipeg city employees got pay increase.
  • July 29 – Province got $1,800,000 health grant from Ottawa.
  • July 31 – Two Manitobans in RCAF who rescued Canon Turner from Arctic Bay awarded George Medal.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 7 – Manitoba harvesting started.
  • Aug. 10 – Price of haircuts went up to 65 cents. – New $2,000,000 runway opened at Stevenson Field.
  • Aug. 12 – Large increase reported in gasoline tax, car license revenue.
  • Aug. 14 – 31 start off in Tribune bicycle marathon to Winnipeg Beach.
  • Aug. 19 – Manitoba Power Commission announced $859,000 program of expansion.
  • Aug. 20 – $4,000,000 expansion plan announced for Rivers air base. – Inwood “invaded” by snakes.
  • Aug. 31 -Bus service to Selkirk sold to Beaver Bus Lines.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 2 – Donovan Swalles, MLA, nominated to oppose Mayor Garnet Coulter of Winnipeg.
  • Sept. 5 – CNR’s Norwood Bridge partly burned.
  • Sept. 12 – High-ranking U.S. British naval officers missing in northern Manitoba.
  • Sept. 16 – 17 workers gave blood transfusions to save critically injured comrade.
  • Sept. 21 – Tax-payers defeated bylaw for new Winnipeg city hall.
  • Sept. 23 – Grain elevator at Sanford burned, damage $175,000.
  • Sept. 24 – Naval officers missing in north found after 13-day search by 60 aircraft.
  • Sept. 29 – Three men charged in $13,000 hotel robbery.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 1 – Liquor commission announced cut in liquor prices.
  • Oct. 6 – Province, municipalities agreed on $1,200,000 assistance scheme.
  • Oct. 11 – Two injured in home-made bomb blast.
  • Oct. 14 – Clarence Richardson appeal rejected.
  • Oct. 18 – The Tribune featured story on filth, misery in displaced persons’ camps in Manitoba.
  • Oct. 20 – Federal officials substantiated Tribune charges about DP camps.
  • Oct. 23 – Judge E. J. Heaney warned of increase in juvenile crime.
  • Oct. 28 – Garnet Coulter re-elected mayor of Winnipeg by record majority.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 2 – Supreme Court rejected Vescio appeal.
  • Nov. 5 – Premier Garson resigned to become federal minister of justice. – Winnipeg tram fares increased. – Clarence Richardson hanged for murder of Ann Varty.
  • Nov. 8 – D. L. Campbell selected as next premier of Manitoba.
  • Nov. 9 – A. H. S. Gillson installed as U of M president.
  • Nov. 11 – Trucking rates increased 11 per cent.
  • Nov. 13 – D. L. Campbell sworn in.
  • Nov. 19 – Vescio hanged for murder of teenaged boys.
  • Nov. 23 – Mrs. Earle Keating nominated as CCF candidate to oppose Hon. Stuart Garson in Marquette by-election.
  • Nov. 27 – Province announced new Pine Falls power plant to cost $15-20,000,000.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 4 – Woman dead as a result of blizzard in Brandon area.
  • Dec. 6 – Manitoba farms, factories chalked up record post-war output for year.
  • Dec. 7 – Sugar-beet production increased $400,000 over 1947.
  • Dec. 16 – Blizzard blocked many highways in Manitoba.
  • Dec. 21 – Hon. S. S. Garson won Marquette by-election.
  • Dec. 24 – J. F. Anderson won Fairford provincial by-election for government.

c- 78

Prosperity of 40s sent provincial revenues soaring

1949

JANUARY

  • Jan. 1 – Provincial treasurer reported Manitoba revenue was at a record-breaking peak.
  • Jan. 5 – Southern Manitoba traffic was tied up by a heavy snowfall.
  • Jan. 11 Winnipeg police were holding a man for the death of a hotel clerk.
  • Jan. 19 – Plans were announced for two new bridges for Winnipeg.
  • Jan. 20 – All Western Canada was in grip of a severe cold wave.
  • Jan. 24 – Twelve men missing in northern Manitoba rescued by RCAF search planes.
  • Jan. 25 – Village of Wakopa was completely cut off by snow.
  • Jan. 27 – Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce strongly protested proposed transfers of staff by Trans-Canada Air Lines.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 2 – Major flood protection planning begun for Winnipeg.
  • Feb. 7 – Child died in Winnipeg fire; Mother saved three other children.
  • Feb. 8 – Winnipeg city council voted $25,000 for city’s 75th anniversary celebration fund.
  • Feb. 9 – Provincial treasury reported a surplus of $4,425,000.
  • Feb. 10 – Government proposed redistribution to increase Legislature to 57 cents, give more representation to urban areas.
  • Feb. 17 – Trans-Canada Air Lines announced plants to move 155 employees to Montreal.
  • Feb. 21 – Dan Palso was found guilty of murder of St. Boniface hotel keeper, Frenette.
  • Feb. 24 – S. Bodnarchuk was found guilty of murder of Metro Manek.
  • Feb. 28 – Six persons died in burning home at Morden.

MARCH

  • Mar. 1 – Manitoba doctors aided battle against polio outbreak at Chesterfield Inlet, NWT.
  • Mar. 3 – Canadian Pacific Airlines transferred 150 employees to Vancouver. Provincial expenditures were more than $36,000,000.
  • Mar. 4 – Local improvements program for Winnipeg forecast as costing $4,000,000.
  • Mar. 7 – 13 Eskimo polio victims brought to Winnipeg for treatment.
  • Mar. 14 – Bread stocks were low as employees of several city bakeries went on strike.
  • Mar. 16 – Provincial highway program announced to cost $7,000,000.
  • Mar. 28 – Reserve air force pilot Vernon Bastable killed in crash of training jet.
  • Mar. 31 – Provincial inquiry ordered into procedures of Winnipeg police department.

APRIL

  • Apr. 1 – Winnipeg went on Daylight Saving Time for summer.
  • Apr. 7 – Landlords in Winnipeg petitioned for permission to increase rentals.
  • Apr. 13 – Assiniboine River overflowed banks in St. Francois Xavier – Poplar Point areas.
  • Apr. 16 – Recent immigrant, Mrs. Mary Machula, killed; police sought husband.
  • Apr. 22 – Legislation for compulsory coarse grain marketing by Canadian Wheat Board passed.
  • Apr. 23 – Red Army officer Dimitry Leschenko taken into custody in Winnipeg by RCMP.
  • Apr. 29 – Forestry officials reported eight bush fires burning.

MAY

  • May 1 – Widespread rainfall ended forest fire danger.
  • May 5 – Stay of execution ordered for S. Bodnarchuk, convicted of 1948 murder.
  • May 11 – Movie star Alexis Smith signed up for personal appearances in connection with Winnipeg anniversary.
  • May 12 – Rental control authorities approved increases in rents for houses, suites.
  • May 14 – Escapees from Stony Mountain penitentiary recaptured.
  • May 17 – Montreal defeated Brandon, on Winnipeg ice, in Memorial Cup finals.
  • May 26 – Inquiry into city police procedures opened. – Judge W. J. Donovan died.
  • May 30 – Four youths arrested for their role in mob attack on police officers.

JUNE

  • June 3 – Colorful parade opened official celebration of Winnipeg’s 75th anniversary.
  • June 6 – Federal, provincial, municipal dignitaries paid tribute to Winnipeg’s history.
  • June 8 – Winnipeg police declared all-out war on pickpockets.
  • June 9 – S. Bodnarchuk sentenced to 20 years in prison.
  • June 13 – Fifty candidates nominated for Manitoba seats in federal election.
  • June 16 – Police arrested 23 youths in teen-age gang roundups.
  • June 18 – Gunmen held up West Hotel, took $5,000.
  • June 23 – Three men sent to jail for West Hotel holdup.

JULY

  • July 1 – Fine weather encouraged huge exodus from Winnipeg to resort areas.
  • July 4 – Two killed, 14 injured in holiday accidents.
  • July 7 – Police arrested four cab-drivers on charge of operating a stolen-goods receiving ring.
  • July 8 – Crops in some areas attacked by green aphids.
  • July 16 – Tourist officials reported that to date, 80,000 visitors had entered Manitoba by car that year.
  • July 18 – Two dead, 20 injured in highway accidents.
  • July 20 – Police inquiry exonerated department, generally approved procedures.
  • July 22 – Conciliation board recommended 5 per cent pay increase for Winnipeg Electric Co. employees.
  • July 27 – Two long-term prisoners escaped from Stony Mountain penitentiary, were quickly recaptured.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 8 – Temperature set record for this date, 104.8 degrees.
  • Aug. 9 – Winnipeg treasurer reported a $7,500 profit from 75th anniversary celebrations.
  • Aug. 11 – Mike Negrey, holder of long-term police record, arrested.
  • Aug. 13 – United College location proposed for new Winnipeg city hall.
  • Aug. 18 – Winnipeg Electric Co. asked for street car fare increase.
  • Aug. 22 – RCAF Canso amphibian overdue on flight from Arctic; 14 planes started search.
  • Aug. 23 – Missing aeroplane found west of Island lake. All 21 aboard, including several Eskimos, dead.
  • Aug. 30 – Winnipeg decided to withhold bylaw authorizing Disraeli St. expressway, concentrate on new city hall bylaw to be voted on by taxpayers.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 1 – Winnipeg announced plans to ease downtown traffic bottlenecks.
  • Sept. 7 – City ordered 200 more parking meters, a subject of continuing controversy.
  • Sept. 9 – Winnipeg proposed a $700,00 bylaw to provide a new city hall.
  • Sept. 14 – Mrs. Doris Sadova robbed, killed. – Hydro officials warn power shortage may be near due to increased demand, low water levels. – First fall frost general over southern Manitoba.
  • Sept. 21 – Premium on U.S. money cost Winnipeg an extra $300,000 in redemption of bonds.
  • Sept. 24 – Poplar Point couple killed, hired man arrested.
  • Sept. 29 – Provincial government called general election for Nov. 10.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 3 – Three Manitobans killed in highway accidents, Winnipeg boy died as result of dynamite blast.
  • Oct. 5 – University of Manitoba reported decrease in registrations.
  • Oct. 7 – Winnipeg attempt to tax CPR defeated by court decision.
  • Oct. 10 – Three drownings marred Thanksgiving weekend.
  • Oct. 11 – Winnipeg Community Chest target set at $595,000.
  • Oct. 15 – 52 candidates nominated for provincial election.
  • Oct. 17 – DPs – recent immigrants from Europe – engaged in battle with leftists at meeting in Winnipeg.
  • Oct. 22 – Suburban municipalities around Winnipeg indicated support for Daylight Saving Time.
  • Oct. 27 – City voters approved Daylight Saving Time and school bylaws, defeated city hall proposal.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 1 – Street car fees in Winnipeg increased to rate of three for 25 cents.
  • Nov. 5 – Strong protests voiced over increases in rentals, estimated 20,000 families affected.
  • Nov. 10 – Many complaints made regarding incomplete voters lists in provincial election.
  • Nov. 11 – Coalition government, led by D. L. Campbell won clear majority in Legislature.
  • Nov. 16 – Winnipeg Trades and Labor Council barred Communists from holding executive positions on council.
  • Nov. 17 – Investigation ordered into slum conditions in city.
  • Nov. 25 – Winnipeg dairies institute milk deliveries on six-day schedule, drivers get Sunday off.
  • Nov. 26 – Southern part of province blanketed by five-inch snowfall.
  • Nov. 29 – Four men arrested for armed robbery of police fund.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 3 – Aged couple terrorized by thugs, relief money stolen.
  • Dec. 5 – Four men sentenced to eight years for robbery of police.
  • Dec. 12 – City traffic snarled by 12-inch snowfall.
  • Dec. 14 – Two men arrested for car theft racket.
  • Dec. 23 – Merchants report Christmas sales increased by 10 per cent over previous year.
  • Dec. 27 – Seven deaths reported in province, four due to fires, three to accidents.
  • Dec. 28 – Premier Campbell reported province’s power production, industrial output, forest production and tourism all set new records in 1949.

c-79

Tribune had 60th birthday

1950

JANUARY

  • Jan. 5 – Temperature 55 below.
  • Jan. 14 – Dog saved family from fire in St. Charles.
  • Jan. 21 – Eight-year-old St. Vital boy saved 10-year-old from river.
  • Jan. 28 – Winnipeg Tribune celebrated 60th birthday, produced special edition February 18.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 3 – Winnipeg experts built portable uranium detector, supplanting Geiger counter.
  • Feb. 4 – Liquor sales set record, profit was $7,000,000 in 1949.
  • Feb. 10 – City utilities profit of $1,600,000 was new high mark.

MARCH

  • Mar. 2 – Brooklands ratepayers asked for merger with Winnipeg.
  • Mar. 7 – 13 highways in province closed by 50 mph wind, snow.
  • Mar. 18 – Two Winnipeggers fined $144,450 for black market activities during war.
  • Mar. 23 – Princess Elizabeth Hospital for chronic cases opened.

APRIL

  • Apr. 4 – Legislature passed bill for compulsory school attendance to age 16.
  • Apr. 7 – Red River started to rise.
  • Apr. 16 – RCAF auxiliary vampire jet crashed in St. James, one killed, one injured.
  • Apr. 19 – Rosenfeld isolated by flood.
  • Apr. 20 – Red River flooded at Emerson.
  • Apr. 21 – Red went over its banks in Winnipeg.
  • Apr. 24 – Parts of St. Vital, Kildonan, Elm Park evacuated.
  • Apr. 27 – Morris flooded, Letellier cut off by water.

MAY

  • May 2 – Red River 3 inches over 1948 level, troops moved in to aid dyking.
  • May 6 – Army placed in control of flood area, Brig. R. E. A. Morton in charge. Some dykes failed, municipal hospitals flooded.
  • May 10 – 20,000 people left St. Vital.
  • May 13 – 65,000 evacuated homes in various parts of Winnipeg.
  • May 15 – Crest of flood reported.
  • May 19 – River at 30.3 feet over datum.
  • May 21 – Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent inspected flood area.

JUNE

  • June 2 – Province pledged $3,500,000 as first flood aid grant.
  • June 5 – All highways, bridges reopened.
  • June 29 – Red River valley businessmen urged complete flood policy.

JULY

  • July 13 – Lake Winnipeg resorts flooded as high wind drove water into south end of lake.
  • July 16 – Det. Sgt. J. E. Sims killed in gunfight with bandit. H. Malanik charged with murder.
  • July 17 – Truck rolled off river ferry, three drowned.
  • July 30 – First drive-in church service held in drive-in theatre.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 7 – Three electrocuted, five injured when near hurricane blew down hydro lines, ravaged crops.
  • Aug. 10 – E. F. Willis, Conservative leader quit coalition cabinet.
  • Aug. 16 – C. Rhodes Smith, W. C. Miller entered cabinet.
  • Aug. 22-31 – National railway strike.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 4 – Grand Beach pavilion destroyed by fire.
  • Sept. 12 – $3,600,000 plan unveiled to attract industry.
  • Sept. 25 – Federal aid asked for 125 homes outside greater Winnipeg dykes.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 14 – Civil defence master plan ordered.
  • Oct. 25 – Garnet Coulter won fifth successive term as mayor of Winnipeg.
  • Oct. 28 – Progressive Conservatives met at Brandon, ordered withdrawal of all members from coalition government.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 7 – N. V. Bachyncky, Fisher, elected Speaker of Legislature.
  • Nov. 8 – Federal, provincial treasuries to pay 87 per cent of flood control costs.
  • Nov. 14 – Mrs. E. Scott, Fisher Branch, left $5,000 to two dogs, horse.
  • Nov. 28 – 500 citizens manned bucket brigade to control fire at Ninga.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 1 – Ten teachers quit in dispute with North Kildonan schools.
  • Dec. 18 – Fire at Portage la Prairie did $100,000 damage.
  • Dec. 23 – Greater Winnipeg road-dyke system completed.

c-79

1951

JANUARY

  • Jan. 2 – Manitoba field crop output in 1950 was worth $164,000,000.
  • Jan. 10 – Fort Garry municipal council complained of lack of telephones.
  • Jan. 18 – Sanitary, safety rules in Winnipeg factories being broken, doctor and engineer reported.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 1 – Oil discovered at Virden.
  • Feb. 3 – Twelve Manitoba flourmills output reported worth $32,000,000.
  • Feb. 10 – Rural industrial power use increased by 19.4 per cent over 1950.

MARCH

  • March 2 – Grizzly bear cub, Minto, taken on strength of RCAF Auxiliary 402 Squadron.
  • Mar. 12 – Five Fort Garry school trustees resigned when $150,000 school bylaw was defeated by voters.
  • Mar. 19 – W. L. McTavish, editor of The Tribune from 1923 to 1938, died in 60th year.

APRIL

  • Apr. 3 – C. Rhodes Smith, provincial attorney-general, promised there would be no provincial sales tax. Brandon MLA J. C. Donaldson retired.
  • Apr. 11 – Federal income tax increased 20 per cent, Manitobans urged price control.
  • Apr. 24 – Air station reopening planned for Macdonald, Portage la Prairie.

MAY

  • May 12 – Province appointed five-man hydro-electric board headed by D. M. Stephens.

JUNE

  • June 2 – First 500 barrels of Manitoba crude oil went to refinery.
  • June 13 – Former magistrate R. B. Graham, connected with law for 55 years, died aged 80.
  • June 23 – Most Rev. Philip Pocock, Bishop of Saskatoon, named Apostolic Administrator, Roman Catholic archdiocese of Winnipeg.

JULY

  • July 5 – Portage la Prairie poultry flocks ravaged by Newcastle disease epidemic.
  • July 14 – Ukrainian museum and library opened.
  • July 21 – Street car fares in Winnipeg raised to 10 cents.
  • July 28 – Bill Bullman won “A” class in Tribune Winnipeg beach cycle race.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 27 – D. M. Stephens recommended adoption of Plan C of Hogg report, advocating public ownership of all hydro utilities.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 1 – Most Rev. Philip Pocock appointed titular bishop of Apro and coadjutor Archbishop of Winnipeg.
  • Sept. 15 – Winnipeg chimney sweeps threatened work stoppage over new city bylaw.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 1 – Province extended life of rent control legislation.
  • Oct. 6 – Wheat grades seriously reduced by wet weather.
  • Oct. 10 – MV Moreca, built at Riverton, shipped overland to great Slave Lake for federal fisheries work.
  • Oct. 15 – Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip visited Winnipeg.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 24 – Manitoba farmers voted eight to one in favor of continuance of grain sales through Wheat Board.

DECEMBER

  • Power from Provincial Hydro’s new Pine Falls plant turned into provincial electricity distribution system.

c-82

City spurned power plan

1952

JANUARY

  • Jan. 7 – Milk producers and milk distributors asked for increase in price of product.
  • Jan. 14 – Town of Selkirk was the target of a day-long air exercise by regular, auxiliary air force units.
  • Jan. 17 – Winnipeg considered proposal to allow all adult residents, 165,000 of them, to vote on power referendum, regardless of property qualification.
  • Jan. 23 – Junior League of Winnipeg, taken to court on car lottery charge, cleared by magistrate.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 4 – Three airmen killed when RCAF plane hit CBC transmitter tower at Carman.
  • Feb. 6 – King George VI died.
  • Feb. 21 – “Oil frenzy” reported at Reston, following successful completion of wildcat well.

MARCH

  • Mar. 1 – Manitoba asked for embargo on cattle shipments from Saskatchewan as a result of outbreak of hoof-and-mouth disease.
  • Mar. 7 – Billy Walsh won Dominion curling title with nine wins, no losses.
  • Mar. 12 – Most Rev. Maurice Baudoux appointed co-adjutor Archbishop of St. Boniface.

APRIL

  • Apr. 8 – $11,000 worth of cigarettes stolen from Winnipeg warehouse.
  • Apr. 14 – Mrs. R. F. McWilliams, wife of Lt.-Gov. McWilliams died.
  • Apr. 15 – Plan C for power development in Manitoba defeated by Winnipeg voters, 18,900 for, 35,400 against.

MAY

  • May 6 – Controls removed from consumer credit.
  • May 10 – Surplus of $1,400,000 from Winnipeg flood fund used as basis for National Emergency Fund.
  • May 15 – Premier Campbell asked Winnipeg Electric Co. for proposal on development of power in Manitoba.
  • May 27 – Bruce Flett, Elphinstone, received Royal Canadian Humane Society award for saving four lives at Clear Lake July 6, 1951.

JUNE

  • June 5 – WECo told government it had plan for power development but demanded security of tenure, a fair return and no competition.
  • June 9 – Hoof-and-mouth disease declared cleared up.
  • June 12 – Three hours after three men broke out of Minot, ND. Jail, Deloraine town constable and RCMP had them under lock and key.
  • June 21 – Tenders called for gravelling Trans-Canada west to Portage la Prairie on route south of Assiniboine River.

JULY

  • July 1 – Fred Constable of Cranberry Portage caught two 37-pound trout during Flin Flon Trout Festival.
  • July 3 – Eight people killed in bus-truck collision at St. Norbert.
  • July 7 – Capt. John Hokanson retired as skipper of lake steamer SS Kenora, after 24 years on job.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 8 – Southern Manitoba worst hit by outbreak of polio.
  • Aug. 25 – Polio cases in province numbered 241, with 10 deaths.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 6 – Manitoba Library Association survey revealed heavy demand for books in rural areas.
  • Sept. 17 – Ottawa announced housing project for military personnel in Winnipeg to cost as high as $10,000,000.
  • Sept. 25 – Polio cases increased 461 ill, 16 dead.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 1 – Victor Sifton appointed chancellor of U of M.
  • Oct. 4 – Survey of 45 points in rural Manitoba revealed widespread use of margarine.
  • Oct. 7 – Manitoba Hydro Board told to make bid for WECo generating plants, transmission lines and distribution system.
  • Oct. 18 – Provincial censor board was worried about showing of movies on television.
  • Oct.25 – E. A. Hansford defeated George McLean in St. Boniface mayoralty. Garnet Coulter won sixth term as mayor of Winnipeg.
  • Oct. 28 – Governor General Vincent Massey visited Winnipeg. – Polio toll now 579 cases with 21 deaths.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 5 – R. D. Robertson appointed minister of agriculture.
  • Nov. 19 – St. Norbert cow, Beulah, belonging to Rockwood Holstein Farm, won two top awards at Toronto despite illness.
  • Nov. 21 – Prolonged drought in Altona area resulted in importation of water from United States, in 1,000-gallon trucks.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 5 – Contract let for new football stadium in Winnipeg.
  • Dec. 8 – Winnipeg Electric Co. shareholders approved province’s offer for assets.
  • Dec. 14 – Irate Lac du Bonnet citizens were aroused by remarks of Mayor Mike Danylchuk, who said they were not sufficiently civic-minded, charged there had been no contested election since town was incorporated in 1947.
  • Dec. 19 – Government announced Manitoba’s industrial production for year was over $630,000,000.

c- 83

Polio caused 70 deaths

1953

  • Jan. 8 – Construction crews on strike at McArthur Falls power site.
  • Jan. 16 – Final phase of St. Boniface Hospital $5,000,000 expansion project started.
  • Jan. 17 – Winnipeg Electric Co. went out of existence.
  • Jan. 24 – 1952 rural electrification program completed.
  • Feb. 5 – Winnipeg Ballet given permission to use word Royal in title.
  • Feb. 12 – Air force claimed Lake Manitoba fishermen were putting out nets in restricted gunnery practice range.
  • March 1 – Tribune started series on Communist schools in Winnipeg.
  • March 9 – All Dauphin turned out to welcome home Ab Gowanlock, new Dominion curling champion.
  • Mar. 13 – Joyce Douglas of Flin Flon, a student teacher, named to represent Commonwealth Girl Guides at coronation.
  • Apr. 1 – Hon. C. E. Greenlay, labor minister, attacked unions for advocating 40-hour work week.
  • Apr. 6 – Attorney-General Ivan Schultz proposed highway speed limit should be 60 miles an hour.
  • Apr. 18 – Rev. Morris McLeod, originally from London, Ont., in charge of United Churches at Kelwood and McCreary, narrowly escaped death when lost in blizzard.
  • Apr. 20 – Melita soldier, Cpl G. A. McKinney, Royal Canadian Rifles, released from PoW camp in Korea.
  • Apr. 24 – Provincial election called for June 8.
  • May 1 – Radio station CKX asked for TV licence for Brandon.
  • May 7-10 – Thousands of acres of bush afire in province. One man killed near Piney in fires.
  • May 11 – Rain stopped fire. Speculation as to whether silver iodide seeding of clouds at Brandon, Austin and Strathclair helped produce rain.
  • May 13 – Winnipeg Transit Commission appointed.
  • May 23 – Women permitted to drink as guests at Legion Clubs.
  • June 2 – Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II.
  • June 7 – Dane McCarthy, Liberal candidate for Ste. Rose and former MLA, died at election meeting.
  • June 8 – Provincial election: Government 33; Conservatives 12; CCF, 5; Social Credit 2; Labor-Progressive 1; Independents 2.
  • June 25 – Hon. J. S. McDiarmid resigned as minister of natural resources after 21 years in that position.
  • July 7 – J. S. McDiarmid appointed lieutenant-governor. – Roy Brown and Gildas Molgat elected in Rupert’s Land and Ste. Rose respectively.
  • July 9 – Three Winnipeg men fined $16,000 for income tax evasion.
  • July 13 – 133 polio cases with four deaths. 400 doses of gamma globulin arrived for testing.
  • July 17 – Survey revealed Winnipeg pay rates lowest in West except Saskatoon.
  • July 21 – Rainfall double normal rate, 77-year records broken.
  • Aug. 10 – Federal election, Manitoba constituencies elected eight Liberals, three PCs, three CCF.
  • Aug. 11 – Polio cases in province numbered 716, 12 dead.
  • Aug. 14 – Mr. Justice W. J. Major, former attorney-general died at 71.
  • Aug. 20 – City schools to stay closed an extra 14 days on account of polio.
  • Sept. 11 – Manitoba farmers received $14,000,000 in interim Wheat Board payment.
  • Sept. 12 – John Hirsch appointed Winnipeg Little Theatre director.
  • Sept. 22 –Rainbow Stage officially opened.
  • Oct. 3 – Polio toil 1,914 cases, 70 deaths. – University enrolled 4,357, affiliated colleges 1,239.
  • Oct. 8 – Flood control investigators proposed floodway diversion around Winnipeg.
  • Oct. 19 – Mrs. Rita Wing, Dauphin, won old-time fiddling contest over eight male contestants.
  • Nov. 5 – Robert Taft appointed Winnipeg police chief.
  • Nov. 7 – Five cents per hour pay raise averted strike at Manitoba Paper Co., Pine Falls.
  • Nov. 10 – CNR president Gordon drove last spike in railroad to Lynn Lake.
  • Nov. 18 – Canada Cement announced $10,000,000 expansion program.
  • Dec. 4 – Winnipeg named as fourth industrial city of Canada (6th in 1939).
  • Dec. 11 – Deloraine Hospital District launched $250,000 construction project.
  • Dec. 21 – Free Press messenger robbed of $26,000.
  • Dec. 31 – Tribune’s Citizen of Year award went to Dr. J. A. Hildes who had led medical fight against polio.

c-84

Bracken headed probe of criticized liquor laws

1954

  • Jan. 3 – Garry Theatre in Selkirk burned.
  • Jan. 16 – Provincial government offered Winnipeg power deal.
  • Jan. 26 – Duff Roblin announced his candidacy for Conservative leadership.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 2 – Throne Speech forecast inquiry into liquor laws.
  • Feb. 17 – Jimmy Welsh won Manitoba curling title for third time.
  • Feb. 20 – Premier Campbell proposed redistribution by an impartial non-political committee.

MARCH

  • March 5 – Free Press robbers caught in U.S.
  • March 11 – Winnipeg voters approved $2,000,000 backing for arena, same amount for hospital expansion.
  • March 19 – A. H. S. Gillson retired as University of Manitoba president.

APRIL

  • April 1 – Parents attack “gold fishing” in school choirs – term used to describe presence of non-singers who merely mouth words.
  • April 5 – Delta Apparel Co., Portage la Prairie, burned with loss of $300,000. Employed 100.
  • April 13 – John Bracken appointed to head liquor inquiry.
  • April 19 – Worst dust storm in 35 years experienced in province.

MAY

  • May 7 – Bad spring weather deteriorated highways, patching job undertaken.
  • May 21 – Winnipeg fire turned on air raid sirens, revealed weaknesses in civil defence plans.
  • May 31 – CBWT Winnipeg television station started transmission.

JUNE

  • June 1 – New Salk anti-polio vaccine being tested in Manitoba.
  • June 7 – Manitoba-born Hugh H. Saunderson named U of M president.
  • June 8 – Time Bldg., two others burned in worst fire of Winnipeg’s history.
  • June 17 – Duff Roblin won Conservative provincial leadership over former leader Errick Willis, Arthur Ross.
  • June 24 – Fifty homes vacated at Brandon due to rising water in Assiniboine River.

JULY

  • July 3 – Thirty teachers started tour of province for course credits.
  • July 8 – Descendants of Klaas Reimer, whose son Abraham came to Manitoba in 1874, honored his memory with family reunion.
  • July 23 – Between 2,000 and 3,000 people in Greater Winnipeg still waiting for telephone service.
  • July 29 – First sale of oil leases netted province $88,000.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 1 – The Pas newspaper editor R. J. Taylor urged relaxed liquor laws for frontier areas.
  • Aug. 11 – Fort Garry opened 135-acre industrial park.
  • Aug. 18 – Provincial treasurer announced Legislature Building finally paid for 34 years after building completed.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 4 –Stephen Juba, independent MLA, wanted to take Tribune reporter Bob Metcalfe to probe allegations of brutality at Stony Mountain penitentiary.
  • Sept. 7 – Federal minister of Justice Garson said Juba could take “anyone but Metcalfe.” Two days later, Garson refused to let Juba make inspection himself.
  • Sept. 10 – A. H. S. Gillson, former U of M president, died at 61.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 5 – Thirty Manitobans bilked of about $20,000 by operators of machine which would “turn sand into gold dust.”
  • Oct. 11 – Hartney prepared $88,000 bylaw to install waterworks.
  • Oct. 29 – George Sharpe elected mayor of Winnipeg.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 4 – Hydro chief D. M. Stephens revealed a 10-year, $252,000,000 plan for development of power sites on Nelson River.
  • Nov. 8 – William Bryce won Selkirk by-election (federal) for CCF.
  • Nov. 16 – Scandinavian Airlines began landing at Winnipeg for refuelling on Copenhagen-Los Angeles route, but not able to take on or disembark passengers.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 17 – First four generators turned on at McArthur Falls hydro station.
  • Dec. 21 – Area of Flin Flon which was actually in Saskatchewan, and contained 100 homes, formally annexed to Manitoba.
  • Dec. 29 – Eight Winnipeg men charged with income tax evasion.

c-85

Sheriff named to examine Headingley Jail conditions

1955-1957

1955

JANUARY

  • Jan. 4 – Sheriff Murray Kyle headed investigation into conditions which caused riot at Headingley Jail at New Year’s.
  • Jan. 10 – Three Montreal youths charged with murder of Rev. Alfred Quirion, near Brandon.
  • Jan. 13 – Tribune story revealed prisoners from Brandon provincial jail were working for area farmer, for food and tobacco.
  • Jan. 14 – Hon. W. Morton, Hon Ivan Schultz resigned from Cabinet.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 10 – Winnipeg, province approved hydro assets exchange.
  • Feb. 15 – Three robbers jailed 25 hours after $30,000 bank holdup.
  • Feb. 21 – Strict highway warnings issued after blizzard dumped 9.3 inches of snow on province.

MARCH

  • Mar. 10 – Inquiry on Headingley Jail critical of jail conditions.
  • Mar. 19 – Harry Shewman, MLA for Morris asked for better farm drainage plans, using PFRA financing.
  • Mar. 29 – Electoral reform bills given second reading in Legislature.

APRIL

  • Apr. 7 – Two men killed when RCAF trainers collided at Portage la Prairie.
  • Apr. 15 – 53,000 Manitoba children given Salk polio vaccine.
  • Apr. 19 – Town of Rivers approved a bylaw to raise money for sewer and waterworks.

MAY

  • May 19 – Flood crest of Assiniboine passed Brandon without damage.
  • May 25 – Thousands of acres of farm land under water east of Portage la Prairie.

JUNE

  • June 20 – Vita hit by tornado, school, hospital homes wrecked, 23 injured.
  • June 27 – Forest fire only five miles from Flin Flon.
  • June 28 – Provincial government retained Mountain constituency in by-election. Conservatives held Deloraine-Glenwood.

JULY

  • July 25 – High costs caused cut in Manitoba Medical Service coverage.
  • July 29 – Infestations of aphids damaged 5,000,000 bushels barley.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 2 – Two men filled, four injured by lightning at Heming Lake, north of The Pas.
  • Aug. 13 – Tear gas used to quell new Headingley Jail riot.
  • Aug. 20 – Kathie McIntosh only one of six to complete swim across Lake Winnipeg, 18 miles in 17 hours, 18 minutes.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 2 – Book called “Laws of Interest to Women” published by attorney-general’s department.
  • Sept. 8 – Three youths killed in forest fire east of Winnipeg, arsonist sought.
  • Sept. 17 – Midtown Bridge open, relieved Winnipeg traffic.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 18 – New arena opened in Winnipeg, with first game of new professional hockey team, Warriors.
  • Oct. 22 – Government announced regulation, effective past Sept. 1, making religious exercises in schools compulsory, with exceptions.
  • Oct. 27 – Winnipeg voters turned down proposed Disraeli freeway, branch libraries and Sunday sports.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 10 – Bracken report on liquor laws published, contained 300,000 words, 127 recommendations, took 18 months.
  • Nov 16 – Three youths found guilty of murder of Rev. A. Quirion.
  • Nov. 24 – Seven business premises destroyed in $2000 fire at Hamiota.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 19 – Manitoba retail sales reported as tops in Canada.
  • Dec. 22 – Winnipeg lawyer fined $11,500 for income tax evasion.
  • Dec. 27 – Huron and Erie Building in Winnipeg destroyed by fire.

c-85

1956

JANUARY

  • Jan. 3 – December 1955 reported as snowiest (19.7 ins.) and coldest (-1 average) in 22 years.
  • Jan 4 – Joanne Boyd, Luella Edwards, both 16, awarded Girl Guide Gilt Medal for attempt to save life of drowning boy.
  • Jan. 14 – Opera singer Kirsten Flagstone was surprise visitor to Gimli RCAF base when Scandinavian Airlines plane diverted from Winnipeg by fog.
  • Jan. 23 – Minto armories in Winnipeg burns, loss $600,000.
  • Jan. 31 –Speech from Throne forecast an inquiry of beer prices, road-building and equal pay for women.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 14 – Heavy snow brought winter’s total to 80.5 ins. Many towns and villages particularly in Interlake area, cut off.
  • Feb. 20 – Weather records showed this was seventh successive day of 20 below zero weather.
  • Feb. 24 – New provincial liquor act passed, abolishing permits, allowing cocktail bars, cabarets and restaurant licences if local option vote approved.
  • Feb. 25 – Car in Selkirk smashed when hot slag, used as street fill, exploded.

MARCH

  • Mar. 7 – New provincial flood policy announced, by which federal government would pay third of flood control costs, province and municipalities to pay balance.
  • Mar. 12 – Manitoba got better financial offer from Ottawa on tax-sharing – $33,500,000 (up $5,000,000)
  • Mar. 14 – Manitoba Conference, United church urged government to go slow on liquor referendums.
  • Mar. 24 – Highway estimates propose $27,000,000 spending of roads.
  • Mar. 28 – Entire south of province paralyzed by blizzard, snowfall total up to 98.4 ins.

APRIL

  • Apr. 4 – Manitoba breweries revealed donations to political parties; Liberals got $16,000, Conservatives $11,500 over six years.
  • Apr. 5 – Town of Morris prepared for flood as high water levels forecast.
  • Apr. 7 – St. James city charter came into effect.
  • Apr. 20 – Towns of MacGregor, Macdonald, Reston, Arden, Portage la Prairie faced flood threat.
  • Apr. 23 –Winnipeg flood authorities commenced diking.

MAY

  • May 4 – Dr. Andrew Moore, school inspector, said teachers were within their rights to spank pupils on that part of the anatomy “which seems to have been especially designed by nature for the receipt of corporal punishment.”
  • May 15 – Brandon municipal employees got raise in pay.
  • May 16 – F. L. (Bud) Jobin, MLA for The Pas, named to cabinet.
  • May 28 – Government announced rear licence plates only required on motor vehicles, regarded as sign of permanent plates.

JUNE

  • June 4 – Two men killed at Arborg when explosion occurred in store.
  • June 10 – Seven Manitobans drowned as heat wave sent people flocking to lakes.
  • June 28 – Water diviner Joe Molanski of Selkirk, found underground stream to help supply Manitou’s $226,000 waterworks.

JULY

  • July 1 – 10,000 attended annual canoe regatta at Selkirk.
  • July 11 – R. D. Turner retired as provincial treasurer to devote all his time to presidency of Transair.
  • July 17 – New tax rental agreement with Ottawa gave province $34,200,000 a year.
  • July 27 – Major-General N. E. Rodger retired from army to serve as chairman of Manitoba liquor commission.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 9 – Province planned new multi-million office building in Winnipeg.
  • Aug. 17 – Man fined $10 for changing motor in his car without notifying motor licence branch.
  • Aug. 27 – Manitoba, Ontario planned to link Hydro systems.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept 7 – Transair president Ron Turner said company interested in polar route to Europe.
  • Sept. 30 – Live TV transmission started for Manitoba area.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 10 – Skilled workers reported leaving Manitoba due to low pay, weather.
  • Oct. 16 – Neepawa citizens annoyed because federal census showed 300 fewer residents than town office count.
  • Oct. 19-25 – 24 municipalities out of 40 in province voting, approved local option for new liquor outlets. Stephen Juba elected Mayor of Winnipeg which, with suburbs, also went “wet.”

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 2 – Joe Malinski, water diviner, urged province to dig wells, drain Red River floods into underground streams.
  • Nov. 12 – Weird and wonderful inventions shown in exhibit by Canadian Inventors’ Association.
  • Nov. 16 – Joe Malinski located four more underground streams for Manitou.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 5 – Province, International Nickel Co. announced $175,000 development of Mystery, Moak Lake ore deposits.
  • Dec. 14 – John Diefenbaker won Progressive Conservative leadership race.
  • Dec. 27 – Gross value of Manitoba’s industrial output for year was reported at $1,4000,000,000.

c-85

1957

JANUARY

  • Jan. 2 – Railway union strike halted CPR trains.
  • Jan. 9 – New electoral maps for Manitoba were being prepared.
  • Jan. 23 – Tax agreement with Ottawa said to produce additional $6,000,000 revenue for province.
  • Jan. 30 – Estimates for dental college, to be ready in fall of 1959, were $1,000,000.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 13 – Winnipeg Arena fined $50 for permitting Sunday skating.
  • Feb. 16 – Manitoba breweries, faced with inquiry into prices and profits, indicated that without profits, they might close down.
  • Feb. 18 – RCAF Mitchell aircraft crashed in St. James street.

MARCH

  • Mar. 1 – New liquor laws in force, permitted cocktail bars, drinking with meals.
  • Mar. 5 – Duff Roblin charged province’s handling of oil leases resulted in $9,000,000 loss to treasury.
  • Mar. 14 – Manitoba Jockey Club folded over dispute with province on betting tax.
  • Mar. 27 – Municipal clerk of rural municipality of Pembina charged with theft of $46,000.

APRIL

  • Apr. 2 – Pine-to-Palm tour set off for New Orleans, Noah Skidmore, only survivor of original southern trip in 1926, on hand.
  • Apr. 13 – Tribune’s new presses started operating.
  • Apr. 18 – Ottawa announced a new $10,000,000 airport for Winnipeg was in planning stage.
  • Apr. 26 – Pilot of Mitchell aircraft in St. James crash was fined and reprimanded.

MAY

  • May 6 – Manitou finally gets water for its waterworks, through efforts of water diviner.
  • May 15 – R. O. MacFarlane appointed head of five-member commission to investigate education.

JUNE

  • June 10 – Federal election, Manitoba returned one Liberal, eight Conservatives, five CCF.
  • June 17 – Three men drowned when car rolled off St. Aubigny ferry.
  • June 26 – Brandon boy, 15 survived after being buried under tons of gravel.

JULY

  • July 15 – Many southern Manitoba fields, particularly in sugar beet area, under water; farmers asked aid.
  • July 22 – Brothers Wilf and Ted Homeniuk battled for Manitoba amateur golf title. Wilf won.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 6 – Province changed oil lease policy to withhold one-quarter of acreage for later sale.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 2 – Boissevain-Killarney area suffering unusually heavy infestation of mosquitoes.
  • Sept. 7 – Four-year gasoline price war which made Winnipeg cheapest place in Canada to buy gas, ended.
  • Sept.20 – Battle raged between local residents and city over fate of Wolseley Ave. elm tree.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 1 – At first session of MacFarlane education inquiry, Roman Catholic schools asked for aid from public funds.
  • Oct. 21 – Premier Campbell drove last spike in railway to Thompson.
  • Oct. 25 – Winnipegger Per Holting refused permission to deplane from Scandinavian airliner in city.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 10 – Seven Headingley Jail inmates escaped, but all were recaptured by November 12.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 9 – Former lieutenant-governor R. F. McWilliams died at 83.
  • Dec. 21 – 1,000 driving license suspensions ruled invalid.

c- 92

Education report ended little red schoolhouse era

1958-59

1958

  • Jan. 13 – Appointment of hospital commissioner seen as first step to Manitoba entering national hospital scheme.
  • Jan. 17 – L. B. Pearson elected national Liberal leader.
  • Jan. 28 – William Morton, 74, MLA and cabinet minister for 31 years, died.
  • Feb. 4 – Provincial revenue, $67,400,000 and expenditures $66,800,000 at new high mark.
  • Feb. 20 – RCMP constable in cruiser car ends last fling of freedom for buffalo escapee from city zoo.
  • Mar. 4 – Winnipeg Public Library declared amnesty on overdue books, got book back which had been out 43 years.
  • Mar. 11 – Conservative meeting at Dauphin turned into a “mad melee,” and court action threatened disrupters.
  • Mar. 31 – Federal election; Manitoba returned 14 Conservatives; Liberals, CCF shut out.
  • Apr. 3 – Minnedosa announced as location for new distillery.
  • Apr. 11 – George McIvor resigned as head of Wheat Board.
  • Apr. 24 – Canadian Labor Congress convention in Winnipeg supported proposal for labor party founded on CCF.
  • May 2 – Provincial election announced for June 16.
  • May 13 – Former judge, MLA, Lewis St. George Stubbs died at 80.
  • June 16 – St. Boniface celebrated 50th anniversary of incorporation. – Provincial election gave Conservatives 26, Liberals 19, CCF 11. Ed Schreyer elected, at 22 the youngest MLA in province’s history.
  • June 24 – Campbell resigned premiership, Roblin formed government.
  • July 23 – Province offered free Salk vaccine to all citizens under 40.
  • Aug. 8 – C. W. Tupper appointed second magistrate for Winnipeg.
  • Aug. 30 – Premier Roblin married Mary McKay.
  • Sept. 3 – Interim report of MacFarlane commission recommended pay increases and higher standards for teachers, larger school areas.
  • Sept. 25 – Dispute between Prof. H. Crowe, United College revealed.
  • Oct. 2 – Royal Winnipeg Rifles marked 75th anniversary.
  • Oct. 15 – Court ruled Sunday hockey legal.
  • Nov. 6 – Winnipeg Warriors hockey team failed in lawsuit against Montreal Canadiens, Toronto Maple Leafs, over player quality.
  • Dec. 8 – Dr. W. C. Lockhart resigned as principal of United College and five other staff members resigned over Crowe affair.
  • Dec. 13 – Transcona police sergeant H. Chudley tagged own car, driven by his son, vowed “This time, papa won’t pay.”

1959

  • Jan. 13-14 – Transcona citizens protested against city council decision to held committee meetings in secret.
  • Jan. 22 – Canadian Pacific Airlines received right to serve Winnipeg on Transcontinental routes.
  • Feb. 5 – Marching Mothers gathered $67,000 for Manitoba Society for Crippled Children and Adults.
  • Feb. 7 – Province announced higher fees for various services.
  • Feb. 27 – 32 areas of province favored larger school district in province-wide vote. Four southern areas opposed move.
  • Mar. 10 – Tuberculin testing replacing chest x-rays for school students.
  • Mar. 31 – Provincial government defeated in House, election set May 14.
  • Apr. 6 – Jack Maloney, pilot missing on routine flight between Selkirk and God’s Lake, was rescued on April 12.
  • Apr. 20 – Asian flu reported in Manitoba, several hundred cases, six deaths.
  • May 9 – 63 square miles, mostly pasture and bush, burned near Oak Lake.
  • May 14 – Provincial election: Conservatives 34, Liberals 11, CCF 10. “Sales tax dead as a dodo,” said Premier Roblin.
  • June 13 – Roblin orders study of provincial utilities for possible improvement in operations.
  • June 26 – Mayor Juba “talked out” proposal for metro forms of government at meeting in Fort Garry.
  • July 9 – Premier announced surveys underway on $85,000,000 floodway.
  • July 23 – Queen Elizabeth, Prince Philip visited Manitoba.
  • Aug. 7 – George Hutton (Rockwood-Iberville) and C. H. Witney (Flin Flon) joined provincial cabinet.
  • Sept 10 – Winnipeg couple lost 5-cent reversed Seaway stamp worth $1,000.
  • Oct. 5 – University of Manitoba scientist spent 10 days in complete isolation and darkness as part of space testing.
  • Oct. 9 – Brandon-Rivers-Virden area tied up with 25-inch snowfall.
  • Oct. 10 – Four engine aircraft made emergency landing on No. 2 Highway just east of Portage la Prairie.
  • Nov. 6 – Province announced legislation for metro government being prepared.
  • Nov. 24 – Highways officials studied use of radar for stopping speeders.
  • Dec. 1 – MacFarlane report urged public funds to aid private schools, emphasis on fundamentals of education, new teacher ratings.
  • Dec. 7 – County Court judge supported earlier magistrate’s decision that trading stamps were illegal.
  • Dec. 10 – Winnipeg architectural firm won contest for new city hall design.

c-95

1960-63

1960

JANUARY

  • Jan. 18 – Government announced start would be made in 1960 on $140,000,000 Grand Rapids hydro plant.
  • Jan. 30 – Fire at Kelsey power site expected to delay power output.

FEBRUARY

  • Feb. 6 – Isaac Pitblado celebrated 70 years in legal practice.
  • Feb. 17 – Plan for Metro Winnipeg government proposed to Legislature.

MARCH

  • Mar. 9 – St. Boniface citizens demonstrated against Metro plan.
  • Mar. 26 – Royal assent given to Metro Act.

APRIL

  • Apr. 2 – Pipe line to Emerson planned as result of gas export deal.

MAY

  • May 10 – Alderman Lillian Hallonquist became first woman ever to serve as acting mayor of Winnipeg.
  • May 15 – Walter Sedor, 8, Flin Flon, released from hospital after air crash which killed his father. Boy was lost in woods for 15 days.

JULY

  • July 1 – Harness racing promised for Assiniboine Downs.

AUGUST

  • Aug. 8 – Lloyd Stinson resigned as CCF leader in Manitoba.
  • Aug. 19 – CBC applied for licence to operate TV at The Pas, Flin Flon.

SEPTEMBER

  • Sept. 14 – Greek ship Ithika ran aground on coast of Manitoba, east of Churchill.

OCTOBER

  • Oct. 26 – First elections held for Metro council.

NOVEMBER

  • Nov. 14 – Three injured in hunting accidents, Gimli man sustaining injury for second time in two years.

DECEMBER

  • Dec. 19 – Supreme Court rejected Manitoba appeal to have trading stamps declared illegal.
  • Dec. 23- Steinbach girl, 12, to give kidney to her identical twin.

c-95

1961

  • Jan. 1 – Metro took over water, sewer, transit and planning in Greater Winnipeg area.
  • Feb. 8 – Manitoba Hog Producers’ Association formed at Portage la Prairie.
  • Mar. 1 – Fees for Grades 11 and 12 exams increased 50 per cent.
  • Mar. 28 – First Manitoba Savings Bond issue sold $32,000,000.
  • April 1 – Preliminary hearing held in Brandon of conspiracy charges against H. Paton and D. H. Cox re: Brandon Packers finances.
  • April 22 – Victor Sifton, publisher of Winnipeg Free Press, died at age of 64 – Gildas Molgat elected provincial Liberal leader.
  • June 5 – Paton and Cox committed for trial by decision of judge of Court of Queen’s Bench.
  • Growing drought situation resulted in call for increased use of community pastures.
  • July 7 – Tank trucks used for hauling water in southwest of province.
  • Aug. 2 – New oil field discovered in Pierson area.
  • Aug. 15 – Census showed major Manitoba centres increasing in size.
  • Sept. 8 – Four miners killed in Thompson cave-in.
  • Oct. 31 – John Christianson, Portage la Prairie and Walter Weir, Minnedosa, given cabinet posts.
  • Nov. 8 – Hunters blasted at stuffed deer in area east of Winnipeg. Cars, guns confiscated but later returned to them.

1962

  • Jan. 15 – Manitoba urged federal board to control drugs, and a voluntary medical plan with flat premium.
  • Feb. 6 – Welfare cases (male) in St. Boniface told to join army survival course.
  • Feb. 23 – Roblin announced Nelson River hydro scheme, to cost $800,000,000 and to allow for export of power.
  • Apr. 26 – Slightly lower taxes indicated in provincial budget.
  • June 18 – Federal election; Manitoba elected 11 Conservatives, one Liberal and two NDP.
  • July 1 – 10,000 attended 50th anniversary services of the Ukrainian Catholic church in Canada.
  • July 12 – Province car licensing authorities ran out of single letter plates, had to start in on double letters.
  • Aug. 24 – Province leased 40,000 acres on Hudson Bay for oil exploration.
  • Oct. 25 – Stephen Juba won fourth term as mayor of Winnipeg. Voters approved storm sewer and school expansion bylaws.
  • Dec. 14 – Provincial election; results gave Conservatives 33 seats, Liberals 13 and NDP 7.

1963

  • Feb. 8 – Diefenbaker government defeated in confidence motion.
  • Feb. 12 – Roland Michener appointed head of commission to study province’s government organization and finances.
  • Apr. 8 – Federal election: Manitoba seats went to 10 Conservatives, two Liberals and two NDP.

(contd c-98)

  • Apr. 28 – Four cent tax added to cigarettes in provincial budget.
  • May 6 – Sunday sports in Winnipeg legalized by Legislature bill.
  • May 24 – Fireworks fizzled in snow, rain.
  • June 25 – Provincial savings bonds only sold $13,000,000.
  • Aug. 5 – 4,000 Mennonites attended three-day conference in Winnipeg.
  • Dec. 23 – Gill Molgat warned sales tax might be imposed.

1964

  • Aug. 17 – Provincial budget increased taxes by $20,750,00, with additional levies on liquor, tobacco, gasoline; gave rebate on school taxes to homeowners.

1966

  • Mar. 11 – Kenneth Leishman charged in connection with theft of gold from Winnipeg airport.
  • Sept. 2 – Leishman, four other prisoners escaped from Headingley Jail, recaptured in United States after they had stolen plane and flown to Gary, Ind.

1967

  • Feb. 7 – Roblin government imposed five per cent sales tax.

1968

  • June 25 – Federal election: Manitoba seats divided Liberals 5, Conservatives 5, NDP 3.

1969

  • June 25 – Provincial election, Weir government defeated; NDP formed new government.

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